Something Interesting about AS and Autistic Disorder...

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NeantHumain
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29 Jul 2005, 10:02 pm

danlo wrote:
Yes, the DSM-IV is very ambiguous, and the two overlap a lot, like Venn diagrams. A friend of mine fits both Asperger's and Autistic disorder, and was given the Autistic disorder, as per the DSM-IV, where Autistic disorder takes precedence. Of course, Rett's and CDD take precedence over Autistic disorder, so there is a clear hierarchy within the DSM-IV.
The one thing that confuses me is that point you pointed out.
"2 (b) in individuals with adequate speech, marked impairment in the ability to initiate or sustain a conversation with others"

Don't most Asperger's people fit that criteria? I have never understood that point. Personally, I can't wait until they bring out the new DSM-IV. It will be a very interesting read.


I have read on a website somewhere that the vast majority of people diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome, strictly speaking, should be diagnosed with autistic disorder if the DSM-IV-TR criteria are to be followed to the letter. On the other hand, most diagnosticians will simply diagnose Asperger's syndrome if the patient is older and has good speaking ability, especially if there were no speech delays in childhood.



renaeden
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31 Jul 2005, 6:45 am

danlo wrote:
Yes, the DSM-IV is very ambiguous, and the two overlap a lot, like Venn diagrams. A friend of mine fits both Asperger's and Autistic disorder, and was given the Autistic disorder, as per the DSM-IV, where Autistic disorder takes precedence. Of course, Rett's and CDD take precedence over Autistic disorder, so there is a clear hierarchy within the DSM-IV.
The one thing that confuses me is that point you pointed out.
"2 (b) in individuals with adequate speech, marked impairment in the ability to initiate or sustain a conversation with others"

Don't most Asperger's people fit that criteria? I have never understood that point. Personally, I can't wait until they bring out the new DSM-IV. It will be a very interesting read.

In regards to the 2(b) criterion, someone I know with Asperger's Syndrome has no trouble starting a conversation with anyone. She started one with me and then asked me why I didn't talk much!
I was given the HFA diagnosis simply because I met more criteria than the amount for Asperger's.
Quite a few more.
So I was wondering, if someone meets 10 criteria, but not the late language development one, would there still be a diagnosis of Asperger's Syndrome? Sorry if this seems to be a really stupid question with an obvious answer!

Also, I know I am being pedantic, but the new DSM-IV will be the DSM-V! (Iknow you will take this in good humour, danlo :) )



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31 Jul 2005, 12:50 pm

renaeden, I think without the language development delay, it comes to the point of being more up to the diagnostician. It's prolly less likely because most are used to the idea of language delay.

But actually I read a study recently which focused on the topic of what many consider a big difference between AS and HFA: circumscribed interest(s). The study found that there was no significant difference and HFAs are just as likely to have an intense interest in one or a few subjects as are ASers. Which helps to blur the lines between the two even more.

Yep, in the end, it's up to the diagnostician as to give a dx of AS or Autistic Disorder. I think many times it is based on the disorder that will get the person services. Usually that's Autistic Disorder. Also, sometimes the more severely effected the child looks, the more likely they will receive an AD dx.


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