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Tim_Tex
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05 Oct 2007, 9:56 am

After having problems with (and subsequently dropping) a chemistry course, I had been rethinking whether I should continue majoring in geology.

I went to see a counselor a few weeks ago for career guidance, and to discuss other things going on (see my post entitled "I finally snapped today" in the Haven). Last week, I took a career test that measured interests and personality.

The career paths that most closely matched my interests and personality were:

Interior design, graphic arts, visual arts, architecture (both buildings and landscape), IT, and finance.

Tim


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Brittany2907
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05 Oct 2007, 10:52 am

Well maybe you should do what the career interest test said.
But are those what you really interested in or is the test incorrect?

If you like geology then I suggest to keep on doing it.


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Tim_Tex
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17 Oct 2007, 9:25 pm

I did a thread about the graphic design field. As for the others, IT is probably the only one not either competitive, or affected by the housing industry problems here in the U.S.

Of course, sticking with geology is always an option.

Tim


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lonelyLady
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13 Nov 2007, 8:25 pm

I've taken 4 different career tests, and they all yielded different results:
-one said that I should become a farmer because I love animals and nature
-another said I should be a liberal arts major because I am interested in languages/cultures
-the third said I should go into the sciences, without any justification
-the fourth said to go into business, because I set long-term goals and I work hard to achieve them.

my point is not to take those tests too seriously. I started college as a history major, then switched to psychology, and now I am trying to get into something quantitative. Go after your passion and don't let tests get in your way. and just because you're not doing well in one class doesn't mean you should change fields or that you'll never be good at it.


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Gallupstr
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04 Oct 2019, 6:52 am

Interest v/s Aptitude

Many times people make a mistake while choosing their career according to their interests. It is very important to understand that interest and aptitude are two different things. In a nutshell, having an interest in a particular subject or career does not necessarily mean that an individual has the aptitude or potential to perform well in that particular area and achieve success.

For example, you may have an avid interest in flying an airplane, but it does not necessarily mean that you have the aptitude to also perform well in that particular career and achieve success within that field.

Hence, it becomes very important to choose a career in which you have both the necessary degrees of interest and potential in order to achieve success. Utilize the power of career assessment before you delve into a particular career option or career path. This is what will ensure that you grow and develop your abilities along through the career option that best suits the development of your career.[/quote]


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Last edited by B19 on 10 Jan 2020, 7:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.: spam

SharonB
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04 Oct 2019, 10:05 am

People find their ways. You can study the "wrong" thing and do more than alright. Just keep moving forward.

Case study #1: After observing myself for 4 decades I can see that I am a Presenter of Technical Puzzles. This can be done in pretty much any career. In college I got an Engineering (technical) degree and did a bit of drama (presenter). Afterwards I fell into Tech/Utilities and found my way into a position that uses my strengths (NOT engineering, but aside it). So for my next "career"... ???! !! ! It's TBD, but coming soon. As some point I want to pursue Acting (present technical puzzles = CSI?).

Case study #2: My Aspie-like dentist went to school for accounting but the pure numbers didn't suit him. He switched to dentistry and did okay. Now (in his 50s?) he's found his niche, what REALLY fits him: in my terms - Technical Accounting, he's doing something related to accounting that requires the mastery of a profession (dentistry).

So go in one direction, or another direction - for all you know one or both will come around again some day.



Tim_Tex
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07 Oct 2019, 2:15 am

Holy crap, this is an old thread!

I ended up getting my degree in geography/urban planning, and minoring in geology.

I have also been self-studying various programming languages, and recently finished a data science online boot camp.


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