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postpaleo
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30 Dec 2007, 12:17 pm

KristaMeth wrote:
AspieDave wrote:
Is classic autism something that should be treated? Absolutely, by ways of allowing those poor souls to communicate with ease. By helping them control the sensory overload that shuts down their systems. By helping them to become a part of society. OUR society.


I really, really did not want this to end up being a heated discussion. But. That is one of the most hypocritical things I've ever heard. Why is in Aspie good enough to stay who they are but not a classic autistic?


I do think there is a line in there someplace, I wouldn't want to draw it, but I think there is. For one thing Krista there are "classics" that can communicate and if it weren't for one, I wouldn't have had the thought to see if there was something less severe. (Thank you Amanda) Having worked in a setting with a few classics, it isn't pretty and it isn't a good life, no matter what is going on inside, it is just no way to live. Granted the settings themselves could be way better and if that group that is so free thinking about Autism had any damn smarts they would be fixing those settings till their damn "cure" came along. Big names in that group? Well pull some of your damned big strings then. But I think enough of those we speak of have described their lives well enough to see that a change in something would be positive. Maybe just to let those that can't communicate do so. Sure might be nice to have their opinon here, cause mine sure doesn't hold much weight. I'm not "them".

I don't see this as heated. Seems pretty mellow and we all sure do have opinions. This is a pretty close to home subject. But no I don't want a fix for me, I ain't that broke, but a better handle on the comorbids would be sorta nice.


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30 Dec 2007, 12:21 pm

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Yet I still keep seeing people get really offended at the thought of AS being portrayed as a disability rather than a gift. People who think that the idea of having a cure is a personal attack aimed at anyone having AS. Like anyone without AS who is pro cure must somehow hate people with Asperger's and want them wiped off the face of the earth.


For me, it depends on what's meant by cure. Many researchers are looking at genetic causes in the hopes of developing a prenatal test (like the one that exists for Down Syndrome) so that mothers' will be able to abort people who will be born autistic (currently 90% choose abortion when the test comes back positive for Down Syndrome). Saying that being autistic is so bad that we should be killed before birth because our life isn't worth living is what I find offensive. I think one site said something like "autism is worse than cancer because the person survives."

Other than that, I support searching for a cure to treat environmental causes of autism. I want to be accepted for who I am and not be forced to change or forced to take dangerous drugs to treat abnormal behaviors that intolerant people find annoying. But at the same time, I want to be cured so I can enjoy life more. I think we should all try to improve our weaknesses and look for causes for our problems so we can be cured of them to improve our lives.



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30 Dec 2007, 12:30 pm

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Autism is worse than cancer in many ways, because the person with autism has a normal lifespan.


Here's the quote I was referring to that I find offensive.

Quote:
In recent committee hearings in the Canadian Senate, a man called David, who refused to give his last name, was invited to speak. He said: "I appreciate this opportunity to speak on behalf of Canadian people with autism". David is not autistic. He has an autistic son called Adam, and is a big deal in the "autism community" of autism societies and pressure groups and volunteer-martyrs. David, in this hearing, is so emotionally compelling, so brave and beaten-down, that nobody notices he has horribly mistreated his son and is now defaming him. David describes Adam, who like many autistics suffers from exceptional academic achievement, forcing the cancellation of David's "international business trip" by yelling at his parents, "Why don't you kill me? Why don't you kill me?" In the highlight of David's testimony, we see that Adam is merely perceiving reality accurately. David says, "Autism is worse than cancer in many ways, because the person with autism has a normal lifespan." To improve the situation, David is saying, we need to make autism fatal. Then it will only be as bad as cancer.

http://www.sentex.net/~nexus23/md_01.html



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30 Dec 2007, 12:30 pm

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Yet I still keep seeing people get really offended at the thought of AS being portrayed as a disability rather than a gift. People who think that the idea of having a cure is a personal attack aimed at anyone having AS. Like anyone without AS who is pro cure must somehow hate people with Asperger's and want them wiped off the face of the earth.


For me, it depends on what's meant by cure. Many researchers are looking at genetic causes in the hopes of developing a prenatal test (like the one that exists for Down Syndrome) so that mothers' will be able to abort people who will be born autistic (currently 90% choose abortion when the test comes back positive for Down Syndrome). Saying that being autistic is so bad that we should be killed before birth because our life isn't worth living is what I find offensive. I think one site said something like "autism is worse than cancer because the person survives."

Other than that, I support searching for a cure to treat environmental causes of autism. I want to be accepted for who I am and not be forced to change or forced to take dangerous drugs to treat abnormal behaviors that intolerant people find annoying. But at the same time, I want to be cured so I can enjoy life more. I think we should all try to improve our weaknesses and look for causes for our problems so we can be cured of them to improve our lives.


Yeah I freaked a bit after I saw Inventors post and then thought more about what I first wrote. In no way did I mean to imply along the lines of what you are saying. Kill them before they're born type thing. All I meant was for people to view us as not disabled/broke/freaks. That genetics doesn't show a defective person, it shows a trend in a direction. It would take a revolution, an evolution in others thinking to do it, to see us in a different light. I guess I just phrased my first statement poorly. Probably just digging my hole deeper, I'll shut up.


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30 Dec 2007, 12:45 pm

KristaMeth wrote:
AspieDave wrote:
Is classic autism something that should be treated? Absolutely, by ways of allowing those poor souls to communicate with ease. By helping them control the sensory overload that shuts down their systems. By helping them to become a part of society. OUR society.


I really, really did not want this to end up being a heated discussion. But. That is one of the most hypocritical things I've ever heard. Why is in Aspie good enough to stay who they are but not a classic autistic?


As a person whose official label is autism, I've often found the assorted pity, condescension, misconceptions about who I am and who I want to be, etc., I've gotten from some people labeled with AS, to be really offensive. As well as the notion that somehow being able to communicate is being 'cured' or 'treated'. Good grief. That's too medicalized for me and also not based in true understanding of what autism is and who I am. (Not to mention that most people who say 'classic' or 'Kanner's' autism, including some with the diagnosis, don't know what it means to say that.)

Saying that 'autistic' people are treated when we learn a standard means of communication is like saying 'AS' people are treated if they learn any body language. In other words, no. Not at all. Does not compute or make sense.

And the idea that 'AS/HFA' people are fine as they are and have strengths but 'LFA' people need to be cured and have only weaknesses, is not only offensive but scientifically inaccurate as to the categorizations being used.

I find though that some autistic people have simply not changed their views of disability all that much at all. Nor are they aware of the many ways in which disabled people have fought to remove the stereotypes (such as defectiveness) that some autistic people fight to retain about disability in order to claim that autistic people are "not disabled". They just take themselves outside the category of disability and leave the rest of us. And they believe that the reason they are not defective, not in need of curing, etc., is because they're not disabled, even though lots of disabled people say we're not defective versions of non-disabled people, nor in need of curing (nor are "defective" and "in need of curing" the same thing either).

Which is why I often don't know how to join in the arguments since I oppose the notion of curing autism but I come from a disability-rights standpoint rather than a "Let's argue about whether to move autistic people out of the category of 'disabled' but keep all our misconceptions about what disability is just the same" viewpoint.

In case anyone's curious about some aspects of my viewpoint on some of these things, here are some links to things I've already written on the topic:

Barnard Power (which is about exclusion in a community that's supposed to include you)

Who Thinks What About Being Autistic (which is a collection of the words of some people who've been labeled LFA, about positive aspects of being autistic -- I didn't include negative ones because I was trying to show contradiction of stereotype, but those of course exist too)

A couple handy lists for dismissing autistic viewpoints. (which deals with how autistic people can be stereotyped into being seen as not having legitimate views)

Temple Grandin, displaying near-textbook “HFA/AS elitism” (she demonstrates the same thing I often see from other people, and, on a WP interview no less)

Temple Grandin devalues us again, in print this time (where she does the same thing in her book)

Why do you think I must want to be like you? (something I wrote for people who do this view to me and others)

And that one, I think I will actually paste in here because it sums up so much of my argument with that viewpoint:

Quote:
(I can now tell from the first comment that people who do not want all autistics to be of the same general type may take offense at the question. If you’re not doing this, you’re not the person I’m asking the question of. There are plenty of autistic people who do think that all other autistic people want to be roughly like them.)

This was the question I was asking when I wrote The Oak Manifesto. But it was not just a question directed at non-autistic people.

Non-autistic people do frequently hold the opinion that everyone must want to be like them. That, in fact, those of us who think non-autistic people do a good enough job being non-autistic but that we’d rather be autistic, are just repressed, in denial, hiding something from ourselves. Many autistic people have written and spoken eloquently about why these opinions about us are false.

But few autistic people have taken on the same opinion when held by autistic people about their own — real or perceived — category of autistic people. It is taken as a given that certain ways of being autistic are just self-evidently better.

When I was a child, my life was being directed by those around me — without knowing it, just as “what people should do” — towards the more valued category of autie. This is not how they saw it of course, not in those terms. They saw it as being all that I could be and fulfilling my potential. But I was being guided in the direction that, unchecked, leads to the “‘valuable’ and geeky even if socially inept” sort of person.

Puberty is when among other things your brain shifts around to its adult form. If my real potential lay where everyone thought it did, I suspect my brain would have shifted more in that direction. It had its own ideas about who I should be, though, and shifted in such unpredicted ways that not even I could fully recognize myself. In hindsight, though, even as a kid I saw things going very wrong that nobody else saw and I suspect the drastic shift was partly about righting those wrongs and putting me on the course I was meant to be on. Not that any of us recognized that at the time.

At any rate, it has become more apparent over time that I am who and what I am supposed to be. (In at least four dimensions, for those who view that in only three, leave out time, and assume stagnation is implied.) Right now, I am no more meant to be the stereotype of “HFA/AS” than I am meant to be non-autistic. I stand a better chance of becoming that stereotype than I do of becoming non-autistic, but so far there is little sign of either one happening.

There is an increasingly common view among autistics that I am just an aspie (I’ll use that term within this entry as a shorthand code word for that stereotype, apologies to those who use it differently) with “co-morbid conditions” making me “low-functioning” but which could be cured to release my inner aspie. That basically I am an aspie with defects. By this viewpoint, I could not possibly object to curation because it’s not autism they want to remove, just co-morbidities. Then I could be healthy and happy. Like they are.

The first thing I object to is the term co-morbid. That term implies a negative condition going along with another negative condition. It puts all conditions described, including autism (that’s the “co-” part), in a negative light and a highly medical perspective. It simply does not belong in use here.

The root of my objection, though, will be familiar to most autistic people. Autistic people are not just non-autistic people with good things taken away or bad things added. We would lose things deeper than personality if it were possible for us to become non-autistic. Non-autistic people think often, though, “All cure would mean is taking away these bad things, what’s the fuss?”

Well I simply am not an aspie stereotype with good things taken away or bad things added. If I ever became an aspie stereotype I would lose things that are deep down and important to me. Spending my time aping that stereotype (if possible at all) would be just as draining to me as passing for non-autistic is for people who can manage that.

By this I am not saying that “aspie stereotype is to my kind of autistic as non-autistic is to autistic”. I have far more in common in the areas that the word autistic has to do with, far more, with any kind of autistic person, than I do with the average non-autistic person. But there are different sorts of autistic people, too, and we do not benefit from being forced to act like each other or become each other.

By different sorts, I do not mean the traditional diagnostic guidelines. I certainly do not mean functioning level. I do not mean differences of opinion (sorry all who try to claim this, but “wanting cure” is not and will never be a true subtype of autism, it’s an opinion that crosses all subtypes, as does its opposite). I mean something deeper and harder to define and all but unrecognized by autism professionals.

I mean the reason that Joel Smith and I could instantly comprehend each other’s body language and thought patterns without having met before. I mean why Laura Tisoncik can similarly read Larry Bissonnette very easily, why Donna Williams said she and Jim Sinclair had something in common that not all auties do.

I mean why I can identify strongly with the writing and mannerisms and general patterns of several autistic people, and less with others, who might make more sense to each other than to me. These are reflective of some of the genuine similarities and differences between us, and they cross all official lines of categorization.

You can’t unwrap all these supposedly “co-morbid” conditions from me and release my inner aspie, any more than you can unwrap autism from any autistic person and release their inner non-autistic person. You can certainly look beyond your assumptions about appearances and perhaps see something far different than you initially realized, but that is not the same as us really having an inner NT or something.

Of course, you could divide me up that way. It would be really easy. You could say, “Okay, this person has symptoms of Tourette’s, catatonia, OCD, stamina issues, migraines, seizures, central pain, self-injurious behavior, and fill-in-the-blank for pages.” You could medicalize every single part of me but what you deemed the acceptable, autistic part, and you could try really hard to “fix” all those things (or in some cases imagined things) to release my inner aspie. But why are you so sure I have an inner aspie to begin with? And why are you so sure some of those things you’re trying to remove aren’t attached? (Here’s where I get told I’m advocating no medication for seizures, I bet. No.)

I’m saying the above simply because I know one of the common replies to this kind of post is “You must only be autistic and not have these other problems and just don’t understand how difficult it is, etc.” No. I just happen to view myself very differently than some other people with the same string of diagnoses and potential diagnoses. Don’t ever confuse viewpoints with diagnostics. So many people who remember that when it comes to being autistic and having viewpoints against cure, forget it when it comes to being the kind of autistic that everyone wants to turn into a different kind of autistic.

So no — to people who believe this sort of thing — I have no particular desire to be like you. No more, perhaps, than your desire to be like me, that you make so clear in your assumptions that it’s just plain better to be like you. I’m sure you’ve said similar words before, to non-autistic people. It’s also true that autistic people can convey similar concepts (words or not) to each other, as I am doing to you.

I will go through my life trying my best to be whoever I am meant to be. Who I am meant to be has often conflicted with the wishes of others, with the false constructs of proper lives that people’s minds come up with, with the values of any given society, and with many other things, not through any desire for conflict, but because of a steady and unyielding push in directions that are perhaps less traveled and less valued. This is not something I chose but it is not wrong. I am connected to the rest of the world, and I have a particular place in it, and I will do my best to be in that place, wherever it moves. The things I am saying here are not limited to me, nor am I claiming perfection or lack of struggle or hardship, merely that there are many roles to fill in the world and what people commonly think of as what people need to be doing is not always what we need to be doing.

Right now, my place is not to be an aspie stereotype, any more than it is to be a non-autistic person. Both have been expected of me at times, but neither has been all that forthcoming in the general plan of things.

Meanwhile, the way I am, the way all of us are, has a point to it. The point is not to make all autistics into copies of the ideal autistic any more than it is to make us into copies of the ideal non-autistic. We are different from each other for the same reason we are different from non-autistic people. And as usual, difference does not mean we need to be fixed or should long to be like those who think we automatically should want to be like them.


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30 Dec 2007, 12:49 pm

postpaleo, I think all research is good but unfortunately people would use it the wrong way.

I was friends with someone with Down Syndrome and his life was definitely worth living. He was 14 but looked and acted like he was 7 because people with Down Syndrome grow at half the normal rate. He was a good kid and seemed happy most of the time. I'd love to have a kid like him.



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30 Dec 2007, 12:51 pm

Oh also, forgot to add, the whole idea that "disability" and "gift" are opposites is pretty offensive to some people.


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30 Dec 2007, 1:00 pm

KristaMeth wrote:
2ukenkerl wrote:
Still, aren't you at least a LITTLE offended that they basically say you have a disability that makes you sound like a little non verbal brat that has no real mind of his/her own? GRANTED, some MIGHT fit that stereotype, but it is probably the minority, and none HERE fit it!

Heck, one of those videos showed a little girl that OBVIOUSLY had some stuff going on upstairs, and they didn't even acknowledge THAT! Her mother said she thought about killing her.


This is the kind of stuff I've yet to see.

::needs resources::

I've heard a lot about the evils of Autism Speaks. Never been there. Should I check it out or what?

Autism Speaks changed their strategy! They NOW have different videos on. One old one contained the following clip:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C7NTfZzS9b8


It came from THIS video(About 6:13 minutes into it, BTW watch about 12:31 minutes in as well! MORE proof the daughter can think and TALK!):

http://www.autismspeaks.org/sponsoredev ... ry_day.php

She OBVIOUSLY has something going on behind the scenes. I don't know what, WHO CAN!? I don't know what is wrong. Maybe it IS autism. To THAT degree, I would love it if they found a cure, but autism speaks will NOT further that! They provide too much propaganda. Still, Autism speaks makes it sound like this autism affects everyone to this degree!

BTW the way anbuend described herself, SHE probably seemed worse off than that little girl!



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30 Dec 2007, 2:15 pm

Suppose that somebody wishes on my behalf, that there was a "cure" for my AS, and then defends themself by saying that it's not a personal attack against me, but only against my condition. Well, who am I? I am not my name or where I'm from. I am not my body. I am a conscious entity, who's behavior can be loosely described by personality traits. In other words, I AM my personality. An attack against my personality traits IS an attack against me.

Now, I'm not proud of ALL my personality traits. I wish I was less lazy. I wish I didn't have so many nervous tics. If someone insulted those, they would be insulting me, but it would be an insult I would sympathize with. But if someone insults the characteristics that I'm proud of, such as my AS, then they incur my immediate disdain.

The idea of "curing" AS in someone who considers their AS to be a ailment, is not generally offensive. The thing is, not all of us consider it an ailment, so to us, calling it a "cure" implies certain demeaning connotations with it.


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30 Dec 2007, 2:27 pm

I rarely take offense to the mention of a cure. NTs who talk of a curing AS as if it was a handicap, may simply be ignorant that some of us Aspies cherish and even benefit from our AS, and who can blame them: They don't know what it's like to live as one. They've never experienced the perks.

However, some of the ideas for a "cure" described above, such as abortion, lobotomy, and shock therapy, I consider sinister, detestable, and reprehensible.


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30 Dec 2007, 2:33 pm

I am offended by the notion that we are somehow "broken," or that autism is something that "holds us captive" instead of being a part of our personality (and as Fatal-Noogie said, we ARE our personality). Notions like these are causing Eugenics to rear it's ugly head again.


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30 Dec 2007, 2:54 pm

Inventor wrote:
The only possible cure is finding genetic markers that would have us selected for abortion.


What do you mean there's no cure? I guess according to the strict definition of a "cure" that's true, but there are all kinds of treatments that mitigate undesirable effects! You can drink beer to "cure" your reluctance to enter social situations. You can smoke weed to help relax. You can drink coffee to increase your attention span (as if we Aspies need it). Those are all fairly loose remedies, but I guess it depends on what someone expects from a "cure": do they want to BE neurotypical, or do they want to overcome obstacles associated with AS. If the ladder is all that's desired, then there are plenty of medical treatments (more serious than the one's I proposed) that can help.

In retrospect, I fear I have derailed this conversation by questioning cure vs makeshift-remedy.


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30 Dec 2007, 3:08 pm

KristaMeth wrote:
AspieDave wrote:
Is classic autism something that should be treated? Absolutely, by ways of allowing those poor souls to communicate with ease. By helping them control the sensory overload that shuts down their systems. By helping them to become a part of society. OUR society.


I really, really did not want this to end up being a heated discussion. But. That is one of the most hypocritical things I've ever heard. Why is in Aspie good enough to stay who they are but not a classic autistic?



Dear KristaMeth, I don't want to start a fight either, but you are brilliant and brave for stating what so many parents who deal with the most severe forms of Autism with their children might think about the Asperger community. Hypocrisy. And, this is the reason why some may feel there needs to be a separation between the Autistic community and Asperger community. It is disengenous (sp?) for them to say living with Aspergers is okay, we are proud and accept it, but expect parents who are dealing with the daily struggles of severe Autism to feel that way. Most people have no true picture of what severe Autism is like and the medical and behavioral challenges parents face every day on this earth. I do because I've lived it. That's not to mention the battles with insurance companies, battles with school districts, battles for their children to be accepted by others, and the financial struggles and stress it puts on families.

If people think verbal communication is the worse thing Autistics have to deal with, think again. Let's take runners for instance. Just an example. Unless an Asperger person has had an Autistic child who's a runner, they don't know what's it like to be a parent of a runner and can no way speak for those that do. Runners seem to be unique to Autism. I don't know of any other childhood disability, including retardation, where there are runners. A runner is an Autistic child who gets sensory input from running. Autistic kids have been killed because of running. There are two parents on Autism Speaks whose children have died since the inception of the board because they were runners. Unless you have dealt with a runner, you can't imagine what it's like to never be able to go out in public for fear your runner will get away from you. Runners can break away from therapeutic harnesses. Runners can escape from playgrounds. When they get older, they can find ways to undo security locks on doors. When that inpulse to run strikes, they can tear off your face unless you release them to run. Imagine being in a parking lot and literally having a death grip on your child because you know that if you release her, she will take off at 100 mph and you may not be able to stop her. The root or running is neurological, that physiological need for sensory input, so to let loose on a sidewalk and end up in an intersection with oncoming traffice means nothing to runners. Our therapist told us that with some kids the only way they feel connected to their bodies is when they run. Their feet hitting the pavement sends sensorial input straight up to the brain and they can actually feel themselves grounded to the earth and feel their bodies in space. And, the problem is that traditional therapies don't always help and the kid may have to have an anti-anxiety med in order to cope. So I ask, why can't a parent dealing with this seek treatment for it without being accussed of not accepting the child or thumbing their noses at Autism? It is wrong for a high functioning Asperger person to think the parent is weak and can't accept the child simply because they want their child to LIVE. You may not like the word broken or cure, but hell yes I'd want to fix a kid whose wiring tells them to run into a busy intersection without fear and get hit by a car because of sensory input.

The biggest irony of all is that many of the Asperger people here are indeed suffering with their symptoms. The posts speak for themselves. On the one hand, they say they're proud and don't want to be changed. But, on the other, some of them have a hard time functioning daily, staying in school and even holding down jobs and relationships. They could have benefitted from childhood intervention and treatment programs whether they be traditional medicine or alternative. There are things out there that could have helped them when they're young to cope with anxiety, gross motor skills, depression, being social, communication, etc... Life could be so different if opportunities to change certain things had been available during the developmental years.

Walk a life in someone else's shoes and you will see things differently. You are all very fortunate that you only have Aspergers and many of you are independent and can live a life without a great deal of intervention or supervision. Some are not so fortunate. Our therapists tell us that less than 13% of Autistics grow out of the major symptoms and don't need a lifetime of intervention. But, if anyone has a better stat than that, I'd embrace it. I'd be happy to know the number is higher.



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30 Dec 2007, 3:32 pm

anbuend wrote:
Oh also, forgot to add, the whole idea that "disability" and "gift" are opposites is pretty offensive to some people.


Of all the voices on WP two stand out to me, they explain things in a way that makes total sense to me, they are anbuend and Danielismyname.

Daniel got recently reclassed AS, but has always been my Guru.

I do go out in the world, drive, run a business, deal with it, all learned social skills.

In my mind I am with anbuend and Danielismyname. I scored way high on the aspie test.

So what does it come down to? They need maid service? So do I.

It is put this way and that, but the question is, should Auties have Human Rights?

No one would question it for the blind, or deaf.

I see no lack of intelligence, or sanity, no reason they should lose the right to self detirmine the course of thier lives.

They make more sense to me than that Stephan Hawkings guy. He is way wrong about C Squared.

Auties are the club used to beat us. What about them! Well, what about them?

They are us, and in my case, I think I am them.

They are the children locked away, given electric shock, zombied with powerful control drugs, Chelated, fed fad diets, chemically castrated, used for medical experiments, and in my mind, that is abuse.

Convicted murders are treated better, much better.

Compare their treatment to other babies, children, young adults, with real Psychiatric problems, who are treated with kindness. Juvenal Convicts who have done horrible things are treated much better.

The strays at the animal shelter are treated better.

They are the weapon that Autism Speaks and related quacks use against us,

The only answer is to take that weapon away.

There is funding for auties, and that is what brings out the sharks.

There would be just as much funding if we were running the extended care facilities.

I do not want my best resource on the web cured. Danielismyname claims to sit and rock in his room, but from his keyboard he keeps my world going, and others have said the same.

I do not like the idea that without his mother he would be homeless, dead, or locked away. None of those people have keyboards.

It would not take much to start an autie ranch, with food and maid service.

As all costs will be funded by the government, all we need is organization.

I favor democratic self government.

Then they can contract for services.

From what I have picked up, costs per run $35,000 a year for residential care. $100 a day.

That is resort and cruise ship rates. By the week.

Ten auties could own a thousand acre ranch with room service.

That is $1,000,000, $2,000 a month, $24,000 a year, which leaves $326,000 for ten people to live on.

If Aspies were better behaved there might be jobs in it for them.

In the fight for the hearts and minds of auties, I know they have have them,

and all the others say they do not.



nominalist
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30 Dec 2007, 3:33 pm

IMO, the best way to look at it is through Judy Singer's concept of neurodiversity. We are all neurologically different. NT, AS, HFA, LFA, ADHD, etc. are simply labels which we attach to categories of those neurological differences. It is humans who decide that a particular neurodiversity is a syndrome or disorder. However, neurodiversity is just neurodiversity.


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