Other spectrum kids in son's class

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kit000003
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11 Feb 2008, 3:55 pm

Triangular_Trees wrote:
kit000003 wrote:
Hi.... um i know it is the parent's discussion an' all... but have you ever thought that the reason they act "better" is because in the mainstream classroom NT kids are mean to them when they appear different? I was undiagnosed aspie my entire childhood in the public school system. I quickly learned that I had to mimic what the other kids did. If I didn't then at some time during recess I would regret it. I hated those kids, because I couldn't be myself around them.

We try harder around people who we know (or beleive) aren't going to accept us as we are (even at age of 6 and 7 which is what i was remembering). but it is also hard work, and stressful. look at your kids after those people go away watch them relax again, you might even see them take a nap or go do their favorite comfort thing afterward


Even as young as first grade kids know that "something is wrong" with the ones who go to the special class. For one thing, their work is "very easy" compared to everyone else. And when kids know there is something that is truly different and not something that is just another kid being intentionally weird, they're often quite kind an accepting. The ones who aren't get harassed by the others for being mean. I feel your explanation only holds up when applied to kids who don't leave the room to attend a subject class with another teacher


um ... I used to volunteer with Bright Horizons. I also used to hang out with the ESE students at my High School. You get to talking/hanging out with the kids there and you learn that it they got treated badly even though their issues were explained to the other children in elementary school and they've known them straight through all three schools. It sometimes gets worse, because now instead of just thinking you act different, they know you are, and can use it.



cartersmom
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17 Feb 2008, 12:31 pm

I teach special education preschool. The demands of school and tasks that may appear "simple" can be very difficult for children with ASD. The reason they may appear "normal" in other situations is that many children have coping mechanisms to help them in those situations. Sometimes they work, sometimes they don't. They may revert to more "Aspie" symptoms in the special ed classroom because that's a safe place and they can be more genuinely "themselves". It is very hard work for Aspie kids to be in the general classroom, even exhausting, and having a safe place at school where their "wierd" behavior is ok is very important.



kit000003
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17 Feb 2008, 10:16 pm

cartersmom wrote:
I teach special education preschool. The demands of school and tasks that may appear "simple" can be very difficult for children with ASD. The reason they may appear "normal" in other situations is that many children have coping mechanisms to help them in those situations. Sometimes they work, sometimes they don't. They may revert to more "Aspie" symptoms in the special ed classroom because that's a safe place and they can be more genuinely "themselves". It is very hard work for Aspie kids to be in the general classroom, even exhausting, and having a safe place at school where their "wierd" behavior is ok is very important.


exactly that



ouinon
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20 Mar 2008, 5:29 am

laplantain wrote:
Have any of you gone into your child's class and worked with other spectrum kids, then seen them in a different environment?

There is a new boy in my son's pre-K class. Very withdrawn. The day I worked in the classroom, he wanted to spin paper plates and coins and line up all the toy animals. Very typical and obvious ASD behavior. He was even taken out of the room for extra playtime when things got overwhelming.

Here is the wierd part- all the kids went to a birthday party today. They had music blaring, all the kids running around this indoor playground. He did not stand out at all from the rest of the kids. The times I saw him, he had sat down to eat with the rest of the kids, went around the room following the clown's activities with the rest of the kids. All but one of the special ed kids in the class were doing the same thing, but this boy is brand new and has more severe behaviors than all of the other spectrum kids in the class, but you never would've known it today.

It's very interesting to me because you never would've known that there were any spectrum kids at the party at all.
:lmao: I love it. Classic.

So... maybe, just maybe, possibly, perhaps,... it's school that is the problem for a lot of so called "problem" kids? :?: :roll: :? :( :cry:

:(