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Age1600
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10 Mar 2008, 1:55 pm

I think its genetic as well, my brother has adhd diagnosis but def has some autistic traits. The rest of my fam history idk because i was adopted, but hes my half brother. I have just autism, and tourettes, my bf all NT, i told him the possiblities, he said doesnt matter either way, no matter what, we'll still love them the same, and all we care about is that their healthy! Its not a 100 percent chance your have a child on the spectrum, and just like somebody said, two nts can have a severely autistic, two aspies can have an nt, you really dont know until you try it out.


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gbollard
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10 Mar 2008, 3:06 pm

Sora wrote:
One thing I don't understand is; why does it always has to be my father that must have been an aspie? My mother had a father too.


It doesn't have to have come from your father. Someone is telling you rubbish.

I think that the really simplified answer is that men have XY chromosomes while women have XX.

This means that if you're a woman, and you have some bad X chromosomes, you have a backup. if you're male, there's no backup because Y is different to X. The same goes for the Y chromosomes. Hence men are more likely to be affected by genetic conditions than women.

That doesn't mean that women can't or won't carry these conditions and pass then down.

There's also a lot of chance factors involved, so I don't think you could say that you NEED both parents to be carriers for a female to be affected.

Like I said though, this is grossly simplified and the genetics experts at WP will almost certainly jump on this (ducks).



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10 Mar 2008, 3:32 pm

There are actually a bewildering array of microchanges to the genome that are associated with ASDs. The most common, occuring on the 16th chromosome, is found in around 1% of autistics surveyed. (And none of the NTs surveyed, which is why it's associated with ASDs.) However, depending on the research cited, the total number of microchanges that may be part of the spectrum is up to 15 or so.

Last figure I heard on probability was that if at least one parent is on the spectrum, there's a 20-30% chance that any children will be, as well. I would imagine that increases if both parents are spectrumites (to coin a word).

Anecdotally, I believe my father may have had Asperger's, and I'm pretty sure of one maternal uncle, as well. There was also at least one cousin who was a Kanner's autistic. (Remember, you young'uns, that back in the day, an autistic relative was hidden out of sight, regarded as shameful. And Asperger's didn't even exist as an official diagnosis until about thirteen years ago!) I am AS, my younger sister is autistic. My daughter is autistic; one nephew has been diagnosed with AS and ADHD (a wonderful combination!). There are probably others scattered about, but until recent years, it was hard to get an AS diagnosis, even after it came into being; I still hold that most of the "epidemic" is probably related to changes in diagnostic standards since 1994. (I also think another part may have had to do with the "dot-com boom", when more geeks became potential mates, and thus had more little protogeek children...)


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03 May 2008, 12:34 pm

Sora wrote:
One thing I don't understand is; why does it always has to be my father that must have been an aspie? My mother had a father too. So did my grandmother too by the way.
I always got along best with my grandpa, he adored me, I liked him and we got along well, because we both didn't like how grandma always was in a rush, being loud, making a fuss about everything.

I just don't understand why people always assume that my father must have been an aspie? For whatever silly reason, the professionals say that it must always be the father of the autistic person who must have been autistic himself. Is there a good valid reason for that statement I keep hearing?


Autistic traits are easier to identify in boys than in girls.


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03 May 2008, 1:14 pm

Most of my family memebers are on the spectrum. I can't think of anyone that isn't except my brother and a grandfather I never knew. I am not having any children and neither is my sister who is married. I think awareness of ASD makes a big difference when deciding to have children. Previous generations didn't know about it and family life can become difficult (lack of empathy, etc )


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03 May 2008, 1:28 pm

I suspect my dad was an aspie, mom and I were talking about it one day and we both agree. But now that he is gone, a diagnosis is impossible. But if he was, I got mine from him.


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little-bird
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03 May 2008, 1:38 pm

Is AS hereditary?
I think it does play a large part. It seems to have been passed down through the males (my dads side) in my family (except for me), though my two brothers and sister do not have it.
But, I also think that my own personality type, my environment, and the way I have been brought up, have all contributed to inflaming my aspie-ness.