Any Senior/Adult aspies w/ financial management issues?

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kraftiekortie
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19 Mar 2015, 9:25 am

If you are on SSDI, shouldn't you be on Medicaid as well--or at least some kind of state/federal subsidized health plan?

I would assume that kidney stone surgery doesn't count as "elective" surgery.



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19 Mar 2015, 9:33 am

arielhawksquill wrote:
This is caused by "executive dysfunction", which seems to be a common comorbid in Aspies.


^^THIS^^


Not only do we have issues focusing on things we're not particularly interested in, we can be very prone to anxiety issues and panic attacks, and sometimes avoid things that make us uncomfortable, until the deadline for getting them done has passed, then get so upset about being late, that we just put it aside completely and refuse to deal with it. If you ignore a thing long enough, you'll forget about it and then it seems like it went away.

Personally, I have anxiety attacks sometimes over unopened mail, that I know to contain legal or government paperwork. I'm overwhelmed at the idea of figuring it all out and getting it filled out correctly, so I'll set it aside on a counter and put it off, walking past it for days or weeks, until I feel calm and composed enough to tackle it. Sometimes I never do. :(


Oh god, this is totally me too. You described my life.

I usually manage to get things done or paid by deadlines, but yes, the anxiety and procrastination, panic attacks and hatred of being forced to deal with anything do with bureaucracy means I've always gone through a lot before that point.


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kraftiekortie
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19 Mar 2015, 9:35 am

At least you keep your feathers nice and shiny!



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19 Mar 2015, 10:13 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
If you are on SSDI, shouldn't you be on Medicaid as well--or at least some kind of state/federal subsidized health plan?

I would assume that kidney stone surgery doesn't count as "elective" surgery.


Until recently, I was on traditional Medicare. It only pays 80% of my dr bills. I still got to come up with 20% for the doctor. I've had 3 practices send my bills to collections already, primarily because Medicaid in PA refuses to pay up. PA will only pay my part b premium. In addition, I signed with a private outfit, which has a contract with PA, to provide Medicare and Medicaid services in PA to special needs services patients via an HMO. They just billed me for a past due premium yesterday, and want their money by the end of the month, else I'll be dropped. I'm still fighting those people to get a new ID card, in order to see my new Primary Care Physician. In short, this is turning into a bigger mess than I care to think about. I've been beating myself up over this, trying to get my car fixed, trying to collect money from people who owe me, worrying about whether I will have a place to stay from one month to the next, and now, this damn surgery. I try to talk to my brothers, the only thing I hear is F!ck you, or so sad, too f!cking bad. If I ask any of my other relatives around here, somehow it always gets back to my brothers, and the hell raising starts all over again. The bad thing is, it was ok for me to ask the church for help when mom was still alive (and I would catch hell from mom for doing so, most of the time), why is it not ok for me to ask for help when I need it? It comes back to I'm not OK, you're OK. Since I'm not OK, I'm told I'm not deserving of anything. I'm nothing but trash, and deserve to be treated as such. :cry:


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kraftiekortie
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19 Mar 2015, 10:31 am

Your situation is why I don't advocate that people go on government assistance--unless it's absolutely necessary.

It's a sucky situation that you are in--with no easy solutions. People in the social security bureaucracy usually do not feel inspired to give a person a break. In y our instance, I would thoroughly research your rights, be persistent with the people in the bureaucracy--but always be calm. I think most people respond more to rational people than with people who yell.

I wish I were more knowledgeable about such things; if I were, I could offer you more practical advice.

Please note that I'm not judging you at all. And I'm not judging people in need.

Frankly, it's almost like the bureaucracy is there to make it eminently unpleasant for you. The don't want a tidal wave of applicants who know that they will receive a panacea once they are on benefits. They WANT life on benefits to be unpleasant for their clients, so they'll feel inspired to get off benefits.



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04 Apr 2015, 2:47 am

It's called Executive Function Disorder (EFD), and is very common among those on the Autism/Asperger's spectrum. And yes, I have this bad. I won't do the auto pay thing for two reasons. One, most of my monthly bills are not a fixed amount, and with auto pay, you set a specific monthly amount per bill. Two, my sister had auto pay some years ago, and one of the companies involved took money from her account that they weren't entitled to. I figure I'd rather pay a late fee, than be robbed. Fortunately, most of my billing companies will take payment by check over the phone. Because of my EFD, and my health issues making it hard to get to the community mailbox to pick up and drop off mail, I have taken to over paying on the one or two bills that don't take phone checks, so that if I am late getting to the paper work, I am covered by the previous overpayment.

Unfortunately, EFD affects other aspects of life besides paper work. My house is a mess.


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14 Feb 2017, 2:54 pm

(Bumping-up thread over 1 1/2 years old).

One “out-of-the box” approach is to draw parallels to senior citizens in order to better understand the service needs of adults with Aspergers.

With Aspergers involved, the needs of both seniors, and adults who can largely function independently share a lot in common; difficulties with executive functioning.

Trust management services that provide services for senior citizens, who can largely function independently might just provide good examples concerning Aspergers.

Is anybody here at wrongplanet.net aware of trust management services (if to assist elder parents)? If so, ask (and encourage) a trust management service to providing services to adults with Aspergers!

Specific support services involve the presence of "third party" advisors involving major financial transactions, as well as complex health and medical issues, purchasing a vehicle, understanding, and filling-out paperwork, and property transactions e.g., rental issues.

Such services are private-pay, and hence private-pay options can be kept affordable; especially if services are sought for as little as once, or twice annually (which is appropriate for people who are able to keep-up with routine tasks i.e., paying-bills, budgeting, etc.).

In a complex world, it's sometimes necessary to enlist trusted advisors to navigate those tricky agendas, as well as providing follow-up support services.

Thank-you