Is Winrar or 7zip quicker at unpacking RAR archives?

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patrick6
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19 Apr 2008, 12:23 am

Is Winrar or 7zip quicker at unpacking RAR archives?



ToadOfSteel
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19 Apr 2008, 1:13 am

don't know about which is quicker, but winrar can unzip almost any archive file in existence (including 7z format) so I usually stick with winrar for the versatility...



Alexey
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19 Apr 2008, 4:58 am

Speeds should be very simular: 7-Zip uses UnRAR source code.



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19 Apr 2008, 8:12 am

They're both quite similar, thoug the copy of 7Zip that I downloaded almost a year ago also came with an uninvited guest in the form of a Trojan that was caught and removed along with 7Zip. --Use WinRar.


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tomadao
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19 Apr 2008, 9:24 am

For unpacking RAR, they're the same thing.



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19 Apr 2008, 12:32 pm

WinRAR is only a 40-day trial shareware, while 7-zip is free software. Use 7-zip.

Fogman wrote:
the copy of 7Zip that I downloaded almost a year ago also came with an uninvited guest in the form of a Trojan
A virus or trojan can be attached to any executable, including installers. That's why you should only download installers from reputable websites like download.com. You should always check the md5 hash and scan the file if you get it from somewhere else.

7-zip itself is not malicious. You can examine the code from sourceforge.net and compile it yourself if you're that paranoid. Where did you get your infected copy?



Fogman
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19 Apr 2008, 1:07 pm

Encyclopedia wrote:
WinRAR is only a 40-day trial shareware, while 7-zip is free software. Use 7-zip.
Fogman wrote:
the copy of 7Zip that I downloaded almost a year ago also came with an uninvited guest in the form of a Trojan
A virus or trojan can be attached to any executable, including installers. That's why you should only download installers from reputable websites like download.com. You should always check the md5 hash and scan the file if you get it from somewhere else.

7-zip itself is not malicious. You can examine the code from sourceforge.net and compile it yourself if you're that paranoid. Where did you get your infected copy?


Sadly, the site that I downloaded it from was a reputable site. I forget which one, but it was either download.com, cnet.com, or sourceforge.net.


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tomadao
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19 Apr 2008, 6:04 pm

Fogman wrote:
Sadly, the site that I downloaded it from was a reputable site. I forget which one, but it was either download.com, cnet.com, or sourceforge.net.


That's why I ALWAYS download directly from the developer's site. It's much more secure and you can make sure that you're downloading the latest version.



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19 Apr 2008, 6:34 pm

tomadao wrote:
ALWAYS download directly from the developer's site
The problem is how you tell for sure which site is the developer's. There are a lot of malicious websites offering downloads that pretend to be something they aren't. That's why I recommended using a reputable central repository site.

@Fogman: How did you detect the trojan? Anti-spyware products occasionally report false positives. Even worse there are a whole bunch of "rouge" anti-spyware products that don't really work and are themselves malware.



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19 Apr 2008, 6:56 pm

Easy solution to your trojan problems - use GNU/Linux.


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ToadOfSteel
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19 Apr 2008, 11:15 pm

Encyclopedia wrote:
@Fogman: How did you detect the trojan? Anti-spyware products occasionally report false positives. Even worse there are a whole bunch of "rouge" anti-spyware products that don't really work and are themselves malware.


You mena spybot? That's what it did for me...



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19 Apr 2008, 11:29 pm

Encyclopedia wrote:
@Fogman: How did you detect the trojan? Anti-spyware products occasionally report false positives. Even worse there are a whole bunch of "rouge" anti-spyware products that don't really work and are themselves malware.


The Firewall I'm behind logged trasmission to an outside IP address , as well as that IP address repeatedly attempting to acces my system via a blocked port. I uninstalled 7Zip as that was the onlything that I had downloaded for a while at that time figuring that it caused the problem, downloaded the current version of Spybot with Teatimer (Spybot's anti trojan resident) ran the software, and it more or less took care of the trojan. --No problems since.


Aseld wrote:
Easy solution to your trojan problems - use GNU/Linux.


True as I already have Linux installed on another computer, however the audio software that I use will not run under WINE, and the GPL'ed alternatives do not have the automation/edit functions and VST plugins that I use with my current system. Also, current Linux 2.6.xx Kernels still have,(To my knowlege, at any rate) dodgy 80211 support.

Furthermore, I don't plan on dual booting on this notebook, as I will have limited hard drive space, as well as Linux's, ( to my current knowlege) continual lack of write support to NTFS partitions.

If I was going to use another OS on this computer, I'd use OSX.


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20 Apr 2008, 12:04 am

ToadOfSteel wrote:
You mena spybot? That's what it did for me...
Yeah, that's one of them. The original spybot s&d used to be one of the best freeware anti-spyware programs. The spyware evolved faster than spybot though, so it's not very good anymore.

Even worse, there are now a bunch of (illegal) spybot clones. They usually use the same database and user interface as the original, but just change the name. Sometimes they actually work, but just change to donation link to someone else. The other ones are malware themselves and may even download more on your machine even while it helps you remove the "competition"! Some of these even keep the same name as the original complete with a matching website knockoff. You probably got one of these. Some of these websites have even been known to show up on Google before the original!

Like I said to tomadao, sometimes it's hard to tell which website is actually from the developer, so I still recommend only downloading from reputable sites.

@Fogman: from the way you discovered it, it sounds like your trojan could have come from anywhere. You don't even have to install anything to get one. Browser vulnerabilities are discovered all the time. You may have gotten it just by accidentally visiting a malicious website. From what you've told me, there's no reason but circumstance to suppose it was caused by an infected 7-zip installer. From my experience free software is generally safer than freeware or especially shareware, which has gotten especially dangerous nowadays.



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20 Apr 2008, 12:36 am

Encyclopedia wrote:
@Fogman: from the way you discovered it, it sounds like your trojan could have come from anywhere. You don't even have to install anything to get one. Browser vulnerabilities are discovered all the time. You may have gotten it just by accidentally visiting a malicious website. From what you've told me, there's no reason but circumstance to suppose it was caused by an infected 7-zip installer. From my experience free software is generally safer than freeware or especially shareware, which has gotten especially dangerous nowadays.


This could very well be true, which would be a shame as I use Opera or Firefox for the internet. I prefer Opera though, as I've set it to register as IE. --There have been a few times when I've watched websites try to stealth install malware via the progress bar, and laughed as it failed.

As far as Spybot is concerned, it's generally not that horrible, the problem though is that a lot of Malware producers have cloned their own version of it, and and left out a lot of definintions in the software's malware database, or have subverted the software altogeather to the point where their version is actually Malware in it's own right. --Some versions even make you pay for it.

I have no idea of whether Spybot is Open Source or if it's been reverse engineered by the scammers, however, if it is Open Source, this could explain why there are so many clones available, and how it can be subverted into malware. --Welcome to the 'Dark Side' of Open Source.


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20 Apr 2008, 1:23 am

Fogman wrote:
This could very well be true, which would be a shame as I use Opera or Firefox for the internet.
I always run my browser under Sandboxie or in a virtual machine. (Except when using Internet Explorer for windows updates). It's unlikely anything could get through both the browser and sandbox at once. You can also use Sandboxie for testing potentially malicious files.
Quote:
I have no idea of whether Spybot is Open Source or if it's been reverse engineered by the scammers, however, if it is Open Source, this could explain why there are so many clones available, and how it can be subverted into malware. --Welcome to the 'Dark Side' of Open Source.
Spybot is proprietary freeware, not open-source so they must have reverse engineered it somehow. As for the "dark-side" argument, I think it's quite the reverse. Open-source software can proven safe, because you can examine the source code and even compile it yourself. Any malicious clone would have to close the source to protect the secret. Even legitimate commercial software can be malicious, but very hard to detect. (remember the Sony rootkit fiasco?) Open source is probably the safest there is.