Finding and Keeping jobs - Tips and Advice

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GCAspies
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27 Feb 2015, 11:56 pm

julieme wrote:
I am currently involved in interviewing and hiring 20 co-op students for my company. When the process is over I'll publish a report on this stuff.

So far though the thankyou note stuff seems to be bogus. Student t test reveils no correlation between thankyou notes and getting invited for a second interview.

So far of import are:

Good GPA (>3.2 for my company)
Enthusiastic - really want the job
Research - have investigated what the job involves and understand it.
Willing to share recognition and credit with team mates
Personality fit (introvert/extrovert orientation) some groups prefer quiet people ( sw design, programming) others ebulent folks (Validation, hardware design). The personality so far affects which opening someone gets assigned to not if they are hired.

More later

I agree that GPA, being very prepared for an interview, showing enthusiasm, personality, and more can make a huge difference in determining which candidate to further advance in the interviewing process or to hire.

However, since when are "thank you notes" bogus? Since when can a t test measure the thankfulness of a person in sending a note to the interviewer, because the interviewer took time out of his/her busy schedule? That is one of the major problems in society anymore. People are not as thankful and grateful as they should be. We live in a society that has a "me-first" mentality and could care less to thank someone for their time. Yeah, it stinks when finding out a company hired another person for the position, when I thought I was the best candidate. But that is life. That does not excuse me for wanting to forego writing a "thank you note" after I interviewed with a company. If you interviewed me, I would you a note to thank you for taking time out of your busy schedule to interview me - regardless if you chose other candidates over me or not for the next round of interviews.

Statistics and probabilities can't replace proper manners I learned in thanking people for their time. Time is finite, and there's only so much time people have every day in their busy lives. People should send "thank you notes" regardless what any t test says. I have not come across a single person yet who refuses to be thanked for spending time with someone. I have thanked people countlessly for taking time out of their schedule - regardless if it was an informational interview, an actual interview, or simply just because someone wanted to help me. It's ingrained within me to always send a note. Yes, sending a note may not get a candidate to the next round of an interview. However on a couple of occasions, someone came up to me and said, "I ended up hiring someone else for the position, but you were the only candidate to send me a 'thank you note' and I thank you for doing so."

Folks, if you go to an interview, please send a "thank you note" to the interviewer either by email or snail mail and preferably on the same day of or the day after the interview. That person may not hire you or may not have you continue to the next round of interviews. However, you will stand out in that person's mind for sending that person a note. It could be the deciding factor between you and another candidate, in the eyes of the interviewer. If I am interviewing candidates for a position, the "thank you note" won't be the most important deciding factor. However, it could be the tiebreaker.


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ginacc
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16 Apr 2015, 6:18 am

Thank you notes like so many things differ around the world, and American culture places most weight on it.
Here in the UK, most people wouldn't mind but its very very unusual. In fact it *could* even be seen as having a hidden meaning like "hurry up on getting back to me. This is a reminder" or the dreaded earnestness. Basically it could put an employer's back up.
Link on different cultures and interview thank you notes- http://career-advice.monster.com/job-in ... ticle.aspx



Scorpius14
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12 Jun 2015, 6:36 am

Sometimes I think bank robbery is the next thing, if u can't join them, rob them.



JakeASD
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18 Jul 2015, 4:43 pm

Although I have a propensity to catastrophise, I do now believe that I am reaching the stage where it would be almost impossible for an employer to hire me. And it only takes a quick glance into the mirror to ascertain where it is that the fault lies.

In December it will mark the five year anniversary of my last full-time position.

When one is 25 years old and still living with their parents it's hard not to feel a stupendously great amount of shame.

The thought of a prison cell grows more and more appealing to me every day. At least in such a place I would have orders to follow and a productive structure to most of my day; right now I am the embodiment of wretchedness.


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arrose100
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02 Sep 2015, 1:55 pm

1) Keep answers less than 2 minutes, and stay focused on the asked question
2) Do not mention anything person (you have kids, you are married, or neither)
3) Be comfortable with silence
4) Smile even if you have to practice in the mirror
5) Be prepared to answer the basic questions (practice at home in a mirror)
What is a project you have work on that you are proud of?
How do you react to stress?
Walk me through your resume

6) Don't touch your face, figit, adjust your clothes
7) When the look at their watch, take a call, check their phone then stop talking as soon as possible
8) Show up 10 minutes early (and people watch!)
9) Never argue, they are right you are wong. If you don't understand, ask for clarification once, no more.
10) You can send a thank you email, most people don't care. Older interviewers might appreciate it. If you do Feel free to use this:

Thank you for taking the time to talk with me about the [position]. I really enjoyed meeting you and found the position very interesting. I especially liked [1 thing that interviewer said].

Regards,

[name]
contact phone number



RubyTates
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10 Sep 2015, 5:31 pm

I feel that an air of superficiality is needed when going out for a job that you really want. It is quite easy, actually. Since it is difficult for me and for most autistics to think of responses on the spot- I usually write out all the questions that I think the interviewer will ask me beforehand and write responses to those questions that I think they would most like to hear. This way I have a script going and take the time to figure out what most NTs would consider a "proper and pleasing answer". That way I can never be flustered during an interview because I always have a response ready. I also tend to smile a lot and really listen to what they are saying and ask questions about the job when they ask if I have any questions. This (to them) shows initiative and that I am taking a real interest.

Tips for keeping a job? Do your work- stay quiet- arrive on time and leave on time. Get into a good routine in how you complete your work and don't let anyone steer you in another direction. By doing this and intentionally keeping my head down and not getting into office politics, I look like a diligent worker and am looked upon favorably by my boss. I have the tendency to get bored in all my positions after a few months, but then I realize that it is very difficult for me to get a job anyways, and truthfully, the uprooting of my routine would really kill me because, for me, routine is life.



hmk66
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25 Sep 2015, 6:53 am

arrose100 wrote:
1) Keep answers less than 2 minutes, and stay focused on the asked question
[...]
10) You can send a thank you email, most people don't care. Older interviewers might appreciate it. If you do Feel free to use this:


I would add:
11) Speak clearly and not too fast if you talk with someone else. That is especially important if it is work related and therefore information that they must know, to do their work properly.



Richardthelion
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27 Nov 2015, 7:29 am

I think that the best way for us - freelance. You are communicating with your employer just via Skype or similar service.



taiwanluthiers
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27 Nov 2015, 7:44 am

No, freelance is the worst thing for anyone with asperger's. Just think about it, people with Asperger's need routine and normalcy, being freelance will destroy that. You also have to constantly upsell yourself because when you're freelance, there's no guarantee of continued employment or benefits.



blessedbethyname
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29 Dec 2015, 3:41 am

Hmmm, there are quite a few translators with Asperger's Syndrome who are freelance. I don't think they are suffering as much as one thinks. Just my 2 cents.



kcizzle
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31 Jan 2016, 6:09 pm

Recently had a youngster (almost certainly aspie) join and quickly leave our engineering team so some more tips:
Your employer only values you for what you can do for them, they have no vested interest in keeping "you" employed over any other random off the street
Your employer will make accommodations that cost them money only if they value you enough to do so
Keep a very low profile during any probation period. Ask for nothing, practice good timekeeping, do not alienate your coworkers or manager
Feel a bit sorry for the guy as he was bright but not able to work with others. He also didn't see this coming as I don't think he understood what probation was or that he was still effectively being assessed.
If you're working a probation period, the interview isn't over



taiwanluthiers
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31 Jan 2016, 6:26 pm

If you have been employed for a while though they do have a vested interest in keeping you vs a new guy (this is assuming they don't eliminate your position due to downsizing) because new guy costs money to hire, and since they will be slower vs. experienced guy there's cost in loss to productivity too. So the advise is try to keep the job that you do have unless you got a good reason to leave...



kcizzle
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31 Jan 2016, 7:26 pm

This still depends on how much they value you.
Junior engineers are pretty disposable and there's a waiting list of placement students eager to do their job for free on a year out just to put some experience on their CVs.
Become too system critical and you're seen as a roadblock and viewed with suspicion, are you actually holding back the team by not sharing the knowledge to safe guard your own position? Watch how fast you start getting locked out of new development.
Depending on the job, staying somewhere too long also becomes a negative as you become too silo-ed, not generic enough, institutionalised and unemployable to other companies, trapped and of lesser value as you're not going anywhere and they know it



taiwanluthiers
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31 Jan 2016, 11:45 pm

I'm not sure what kind of engineering firm you are working in, there are many different types... I will assume computer related since it sounded very competitive.

I mean if it's so competitive that there's a huge pool of people willing to work for free for "exposure", then perhaps it's not a very good place for anyone with Asperger's to be in. Truthfully anyone with asperger's is already at a disadvantage when the competition is based on your "likability" and unfortunately gets let go a lot in a probationary period.

I read that anything computer related is extremely competitive, where even unpaid internship require 3 years of experience (why anyone with experience would do internship is beyond me, that's the whole point of internship).



kcizzle
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07 Feb 2016, 3:40 am

Software engineering. It's become more competitive in the past 8 or so years, but that could just be globalisation, the world and ousourcing. It's a good job, but no longer a job for life