Poll on neurotypical recognition of Autist emotions

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Have you had neurotypicals mislabel your emotions?
Poll ended at 13 May 2008, 2:10 pm
Often 71%  71%  [ 42 ]
Occasionally 22%  22%  [ 13 ]
Rarely 7%  7%  [ 4 ]
Never 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
Total votes : 59

Anna
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06 May 2008, 2:10 pm

I'm investigating the incidence of NTs mislabelling autist's facial emotions. If you are on the spectrum, have you had this happen to you?
If so, could you explain in comments what kind of mislabelling occurred? eg:
what you felt and how it was labelled?
eg:
neutral mislabelled as angry
happy mislabelled as neutral
etc

[edited for clarity] I'm in a class that studies facial emotion learning and this would be helpful. Thanks.



Last edited by Anna on 06 May 2008, 3:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Jeyradan
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06 May 2008, 2:27 pm

It usually ends in a negative light for me (i.e., a neutral or even positive emotion gets replaced with a negative one like sadness, anger, boredom, lack of interest, etc.).
I don't know why some people are so bent on assigning negativity.

Edit: the list was kind of incomplete and hard to explain, so I changed it.



Anna
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06 May 2008, 3:03 pm

Jeyradan wrote:
It usually ends in a negative light for me (i.e., a neutral or even positive emotion gets replaced with a negative one like sadness, anger, boredom, lack of interest, etc.).
I don't know why some people are so bent on assigning negativity.

Edit: the list was kind of incomplete and hard to explain, so I changed it.


So when you're feeling neutral or positive, the emotion gets mislabeled as sad, angry, bored, apathetic? Is that what you meant? (Just restating to make sure I understand you. Thanks)



alexbeetle
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06 May 2008, 4:18 pm

my natural expression is apparently interpreted as extreme sadness

i get told i give people bas/funny looks (not even conciously looking at them)

i smile when i've done something wrong and think i will be in trouble which makes it look like i'm happy to have done it and am being really mean


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krex
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06 May 2008, 4:35 pm

I am often asked if I am angry or sad when I am feeling neutral or positive.

I was often told that I was not showing enough emotion, especially that I did not show an adequate amount of enthusiasm when someone had done something for me or given me something, etc. I did feel greatful and said thank you, but evidently it was not convincing? I was often accused of being "to intense" or "angry" when I was discussing issues of interst to me. Evidently, when I am intellectually engaged and stimulated it comes off as....angry ? I was never sure what they were "seeing or hearing" to give them that impression because often I had little emotional feeling about the topic, just found it "interesting". This was even worse when seeing therapist because they would claim that I was "detached" from my feelings when I didn't cry or look sad when recounting past experiences that they perceived as very negative. That was frustrating, as it is impossible to "prove" that you are not repressing emotions.

On the other side of the issue...I often felt that others were "acting" when they showed a lot of emotional expression. They appeared fake to me....like when girls would run up to each other squeeling and hugging and saying "I missed you soooo much",etc. I actually find those kind of emotional desplayes confusing and annoying.


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Anniemaniac
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06 May 2008, 4:50 pm

Like Krex, I too am often mistaken to be angry or upset when really, I'm happy or calm. When I am truely upset, people, other than my mum, never notice, even if I'm facing them.

I've had a couple of people think I'm bored around them, when really, I just didn't know how to act, or had run out of things to say.

I also had a teacher's assistant once tell me that I "make funny faces" that make me appear annoyed. I wasn't aware I was making any faces at the time she pointed it out. I was feeling fine, not angry or anything. Hmm...



DukeGallison
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06 May 2008, 5:38 pm

My parents don't exactly read me like braille, and whine whenever I'm not smiling...



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06 May 2008, 11:04 pm

My parents think I am bored when I stim and some people have not been able to notice when I am angry



qgambit
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06 May 2008, 11:07 pm

My nt friend told me that it is really hard to tell when I'm happy.



nomnom_hamster
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07 May 2008, 12:13 am

Anna wrote:
I'm investigating the incidence of NTs mislabelling autist's facial emotions. If you are on the spectrum, have you had this happen to you?
If so, could you explain in comments what kind of mislabelling occurred? eg:
what you felt and how it was labelled?
eg:
neutral mislabelled as angry
happy mislabelled as neutral
etc

[edited for clarity] I'm in a class that studies facial emotion learning and this would be helpful. Thanks.


From what people say to me, I guess my thinking face looks like a mad face. I think its because I "furrow my brow" (whatever that is). In between my eyebrows/above my eyes my face gets all crinkly. I guess it can look like that when I get mad.

I wouldn't know cause its not like I run to a mirror to see what my face looks like when I start thinking (sarcasm) or get mad.



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07 May 2008, 12:24 pm

My neutral face is sometimes mistaken as angry. There isn't much link between my emotions and my face, so don't smile or anything unless I'm making concious efforts. Well at least that isn't very hard, though I'm not sure if my smile looks real. Nobody' ever comented on it though, so it's probably good enough.



Jeyradan
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07 May 2008, 1:38 pm

Anna wrote:
Jeyradan wrote:
It usually ends in a negative light for me (i.e., a neutral or even positive emotion gets replaced with a negative one like sadness, anger, boredom, lack of interest, etc.).
I don't know why some people are so bent on assigning negativity.

Edit: the list was kind of incomplete and hard to explain, so I changed it.


So when you're feeling neutral or positive, the emotion gets mislabeled as sad, angry, bored, apathetic? Is that what you meant? (Just restating to make sure I understand you. Thanks)


Yes, that's usually what happens. Sometimes people don't catch my "negative" emotions, like sadness or reluctance, and think I'm neutral - but they almost always do what you described (interpret neutral/positive as negative).



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08 May 2008, 2:28 am

Hi,

Of course. People are always telling me "Smile." I'm one of the most consistently content people I know. I used to get offended when people told me to smile when I thought I was just thinking about the oxyhemoglobin dissasociation curve. Or 5-dimensional DNA that can think. Or key lime pie.

Somehow I figured out that if I take all these people as seriously as they're taking me, then we'll have even more problems. So I just shrug my shoulders or say "oh yes, that was my Easter Island impersonation, thanks." They crack up usually. Limit one joke per target!

Patrick



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08 May 2008, 8:52 am

I've had my neighbour say to me on several occassions..."Why so sad?".
I wasn't even sad, I was neutral.


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Speckles
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08 May 2008, 6:19 pm

Generally, no, unless I'm actively trying to fool them. And I can't fool the people who know me at all - it's very frustrating. In the past this wasn't always true though.

I've spent a lot of time trying to intellectually understand body language - maybe that made a difference?



Izaak
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09 May 2008, 9:34 am

I get mistaken a lot all over the random place. I've been happy and mistaken for angry. I've been frustrated and mistaken for happy. I've been angry and mistaken for apathy. And every colour in between. I've also been told I am "difficult to read" also. I dunno, I don't get other people's faces so I always think people just read into it too much.

The only one you can pretty much guarantee reading is when I am having one of my "joy" moments. Like when I'm playing with my cat, or spinning in a swivel chair, or dancing in the rain etc... My more intellectually enjoyable moments are mistaken (like listening to Mozart, or solving a difficult puzzle), but never my sensory joys.


Hope that helps your class.