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Willard
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07 May 2008, 3:04 pm

EvilKimEvil wrote:
Either pay what it costs to get it done well or don't get it. That is unless you want to do it yourself and pay next to nothing!
I'm serious. I've never had the cash for good pro tattoos so I have the home-made kind. I think I have 8 of them. I did most of them myself. It's not so bad once you learn how to do it, get used to the feeling, and have a 40 oz. at your side! :twisted:

*Disclaimer*: EvilKimEvil does not officially advocate getting drunk and jabbing an ink-soaked sewing needle into your own skin. Nor is she at liberty to comment on the legality and/or morality of such a practice.


There are only so many body parts one can reach by oneself, and tattooing is a two-handed process (machine in one hand, stretch the skin tight with the other), so your locational choices become rather limited that way, though I do have a large tribal dragon, a gargoyle bat and Kevin Smith's Buddy Christ on my inner calves that I did while apprenticing for my license.



velodog
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07 May 2008, 3:33 pm

Willard, I've known for years not to listen to Gun Store employees regarding state laws and Hunting Regulations. I never bothered crosschecking the BS that passes the time while getting a tattoo. Thanks for the heads up.



Willard
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07 May 2008, 3:45 pm

Well, from that info, it appears as though they've only been regulating since 1999, which is in itself amazing. Unless maybe that bill replaced an earlier version with less comprehensive provisions.



EvilKimEvil
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07 May 2008, 5:29 pm

Willard wrote:
There are only so many body parts one can reach by oneself,


That's what friends are for!

Willard wrote:
and tattooing is a two-handed process (machine in one hand, stretch the skin tight with the other),


There are ways to create tattoos that do not involve machines. I think that when you're not using a machine, using one hand becomes more feasible. At least I've found a way to do so that works for me. The end result is what matters, anyway.

I'm not advocating that anyone do this kind of tattooing. I'm only defending my own choices, which I do not regret. I don't talk about having non-professional non-machine tattoos very often because people tend to take issue with it.



Willard
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07 May 2008, 5:57 pm

EvilKimEvil wrote:
There are ways to create tattoos that do not involve machines. I think that when you're not using a machine, using one hand becomes more feasible.


There's the original Polynesian technique, of course, where the needle is at the end of a stick and you tap the back of the stick with a small hammer, making one dot at a time. It's extremely time consuming, but I've seen some stunning designs done with that sort of stippling. Of course, it still takes two hands, one to steady the needle bar and one to tap with the hammer. That's where the word tattoo comes from, the tapping sound of the hammer. (probably combined with the sound of the customer going "Ooh! Ooh!" with each blow.

Some kitchen scratchers use a pencil with the eraser jammed full of sewing needles and wrapped with twine or thread to soak up ink. You could theoretically wield that device with one hand if you really jabbed it in hard, but the skin still needs to be stretched tight, or the needles bounce off the surface like it was a sheet of rubber*. You'll get the sensation of being poked, but the area will only turn a little gray, if it takes any color at all. Homeboy methods like that also generally involve the use of cheap substandard inks, that turn grey/green with repeated exposure to the melanin released in the suntanning process.

I have seen one homemade electric tattoo machine made from a tiny motor and a ballpoint pen. The guy who brought it in had had it used on him and said it hurt like hell. No doubt. I'm sure that was very sanitary, too.

*jabbing a needle with that kind of pressure increases your chances of a blowout - the ink is supposed to go between the second and third layers of epidermis - any deeper and you're injecting ink into the fatty tissue, which is like shooting it into a cube of gelatin, it spreads out instead of keeping a tight line, and once that happens, there's no fixing it. It's coverup time.



jawbrodt
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07 May 2008, 6:00 pm

I've always wanted to get a tattoo, but I could never decide what to choose. The fact that it would be there forever, was my main problem. It would have to be the "perfect" tattoo, and I've yet to find it. Maybe someday.... :?


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Willard
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07 May 2008, 6:33 pm

jawbrodt wrote:
I've always wanted to get a tattoo, but I could never decide what to choose. The fact that it would be there forever, was my main problem. It would have to be the "perfect" tattoo, and I've yet to find it. Maybe someday.... :?


When I first began to consider it (at the age of 36), I asked everyone I knew who had any all the standard questions: how much does it hurt, ever have any regrets, etc. My boss at work didin't have any, but his wife did, and when I asked him if she'd ever expressed any regrets, he said "You have to understand, she's not like you and me, constantly second-guessing every decision she makes and analyzing everything to be sure she hasn't made a mistake. Once she makes the decision to do something, she just does it and never looks back." It was kind off an epiphany for me. I realized that's just the way you have to handle some things. Trust your gut and don't waste time worrying yourself to death after, just look at it as an experience you had, and you wouldn't be the same person if you hadn't done it. Each piece is a signpost on the road of your life. You're not gonna live forever, and when you're 90 years old, who the hell are you gonna be looking to impress with your pristine wrinkly body? I think old folks covered head to toe in tattoos look cool. Man, those people have done some serious living. I respect that.

That said, I still spent eighteen months drawing and redrawing my designs before I got the first one done. I started with the smallest and searched carefully for an artist I felt I could trust and be comfortable with (Always see the artist's portfolio). The guy I liked best was the only one of a dozen I talked to who pointed out that my designs had too many tiny details and needed to be enlarged and altered, taking into consideration the curvature of the muscles under the skin.

And was I horrified and shamed when it was over? Hell ,no - it was like a spiritual initiation. The buzz of the machine, the faint smell of lilac from the Green Soap, even the mild discomfort, it was hypnotic and relaxing, and it changed me. It became one of my obsessions. Now I do it for a living, and you can bet it ain't 'cause I'm a people person.



EvilKimEvil
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07 May 2008, 6:57 pm

Willard, per my initial disclaimer, I am not interested in discussing the specifics or the pros and cons of less-than-professional/unconventional tattooing. I am fully informed on the subject, as tattoos have been a small life-long obsession. I'm familiar with everything you described, and the imperfections that can result.

I like certain kinds of imperfections. I have a different aesthetic than most people. I'm not trying to look nice and clean-cut. I'm aware that other people have different ideals and aesthetics, and I don't care. I like my tattoos.



Willard
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07 May 2008, 8:39 pm

EvilKimEvil wrote:
Willard, per my initial disclaimer, I am not interested in discussing the specifics or the pros and cons of less-than-professional/unconventional tattooing. I am fully informed on the subject, as tattoos have been a small life-long obsession. I'm familiar with everything you described, and the imperfections that can result.

I like certain kinds of imperfections. I have a different aesthetic than most people. I'm not trying to look nice and clean-cut. I'm aware that other people have different ideals and aesthetics, and I don't care. I like my tattoos.


As well you should. I wasn't trying to suggest that you should feel otherwise. Just don't want anyone to hurt themselves or catch something they can't wash off. I withdraw from the conversation.



EvilKimEvil
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07 May 2008, 10:15 pm

Cool. I don't want anyone to hurt themselves either! :D



velodog
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07 May 2008, 11:03 pm

There's only one tattoo that I have had done that I didn't like. That is the one that I had Jeannie go over to fix some lines and clean it up and add a dragon (it's a castle), it looked like crap before. Some colors like red and white get eaten up by my body.



Viola
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08 May 2008, 9:59 am

I'm planning on getting tattoos to commemorate special events in my life. My first is planned for four years out; it will probably be an alto clef on the back of my neck, near the hairline; it's to commemorate my graduation from conservatory. (provided that that actually happens!)

this is an alto clef.

www.musiccorner.co.uk/images/15symbol.jpg

My little sis wants to get her "wedding ring" tattooed onto her finger. Think of the symbolism in an act like that!



velodog
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08 May 2008, 10:04 am

That's cool, it will make a nice tattoo. :D



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08 May 2008, 11:02 am

I actually contemplated my first tattoo for seven years (since I am prone to changing my mind and appearance). I finally went for it after a very significant event in my life, as a special milestone. I have no regrets and I can't see myself ever having any.


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12 May 2008, 3:50 pm

do u guys watch miami ink? i have seen some cool tattoos on that show like of coyfish and tigers and stuff. but what i can't get is how they are able to sit still for something like 7 hrs straight with needles going into them like that.