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zer0netgain
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21 Dec 2009, 2:51 pm

visagrunt wrote:
Why is it that every jury summons is met with the question, "how do I get out of it?"


Maybe because it's not worth the hassle. :lol:

I did jury duty twice in my life. The first time, I had to spend HOURS sitting in a room and I wasn't put on a jury, so that one day was it.

The second time I was put on a grand jury list for a year, but never got called to come in. I credit that one to having a law degree. Attorneys seem to like their jurists dumb about the law when it comes to the jury selection.

If your boss pays you for being on a jury panel, it's a worthwhile experience. Many employers do not, and you might even lose your job because of it (temp agencies). If you have other daily obligations (e.g. family, children) the imposition of this "civic duty" (which I debate really isn't a duty) become unreasonable.

I am no longer registered to vote (for my own personal reasons), so I will never have this issue again in my life.



t0
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21 Dec 2009, 3:10 pm

visagrunt wrote:
Given our usual difficulty with non-verbal cues, how well can we evaluate credibility? If testimony is contradictory, whose version does one believe, if they are both consistent with the the physical evidence? I think that makes an Aspie juror a bit of a crap shoot for a litigator, one which many would, I think, prefer to avoid.


I think most jurors (NT or ASD) are considered a crap shoot. Lawyers aren't looking for the perfect juror anyway - they're looking for ones where behavioral analysis studies show that the juror is likely to lean their direction.

I also believe that jury duty is a responsibility that a citizen shouldn't ignore or try to get out of. If you're capable, you should serve. If you're not willing to serve on a jury, I don't see why the courts should provide one for you should you end up in court.



CockneyRebel
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21 Dec 2009, 6:47 pm

If I was called for jury duty, I'd write the court saying that I wouldn't be capable, due to social anxiety and bowel issues.


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21 Dec 2009, 7:53 pm

Since I am diagnosed with ADHD and Asperger's, I'm going to get my doctor to sign a paper to get me out of jury duty.



glider18
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21 Dec 2009, 11:35 pm

A couple years ago I got a notice for jury duty. I got my doctor to send a letter stating that I have a bad leg from a blood clot and cannot sit for long periods of time. Last month, I got a summons for jury duty this month. I sent a letter to them stating the letter sent earlier about the leg. I also stated I had AS and didn't feel like serving on jury duty would be the best thing. I haven't been called in to serve.


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zer0netgain
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22 Dec 2009, 8:52 am

t0 wrote:
I also believe that jury duty is a responsibility that a citizen shouldn't ignore or try to get out of. If you're capable, you should serve. If you're not willing to serve on a jury, I don't see why the courts should provide one for you should you end up in court.


Ah, but as a defendant, you have a RIGHT to a trial by a jury of your peers. Nowhere is there a legal obligation to serve on a jury. Logically, you would not want to be tried by people who do not want to be on a jury doing the job of a jurist.



t0
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22 Dec 2009, 9:27 am

zer0netgain wrote:
Ah, but as a defendant, you have a RIGHT to a trial by a jury of your peers. Nowhere is there a legal obligation to serve on a jury. Logically, you would not want to be tried by people who do not want to be on a jury doing the job of a jurist.


I understand the rights granted to US citizens by the constitution. It doesn't change my belief that you SHOULD serve on jury duty if capable. It's a method of serving the county that provides you with those rights.



zer0netgain
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22 Dec 2009, 1:48 pm

t0 wrote:
zer0netgain wrote:
Ah, but as a defendant, you have a RIGHT to a trial by a jury of your peers. Nowhere is there a legal obligation to serve on a jury. Logically, you would not want to be tried by people who do not want to be on a jury doing the job of a jurist.


I understand the rights granted to US citizens by the constitution. It doesn't change my belief that you SHOULD serve on jury duty if capable. It's a method of serving the county that provides you with those rights.


Well, for me, and this would work as a potential "easy out" for jury duty. Let the court know that you are an ardent believer in the power of jury nullification.

See how fast they send you home. :lol:

For those that do not know the term, "jury nullification" is the inherent right of a jury to NOT ENFORCE a law, even when the person accused is 100% guilty of the crime.

Example: Jury believes that the war on drugs is unconstitutional. Man is accused of possessing drugs. The evidence is absolute. Jury refuses to convict. Court can't do squat.

The jury has no legal obligation to do what the court tells it to do. They are the safeguard that prevents the government from doing whatever it wants to whomever it wants where due process is involved. The people can refuse to help enforce laws they feel are inherently bad, and it is a useful tool because courts don't always oppose government corruption or bad law when it is encountered.

Nowadays, most courts want jurists that will follow a logical progression of A to B to C and convict if the conditions are met. However, try (as defense counsel) to have a jury instruction notifying the jury of their inherent right of "jury nullification" and you will rarely find a judge that will allow it. They sure as heck won't want a jurist on the panel who admits to knowing what it means.

Aside from my legal background, I would refuse to convict a person for mere possession or use of drugs on the principle that it's unconstitutional from all that I've learned about the law. Those two issues alone make me pretty much toxic to any potential jury pool.



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26 Dec 2009, 3:23 am

nettiespaghetti wrote:
I just received a summons for jury duty. I'm a nervous wreck. I know sometimes you don't end up having to go, but not only am I going to have to explain to my place of employment and miss that pay (I know the court pay you something, but it's not much) and then I worry because I've never been there, so I'm going to have to somehow find a babysitter for my son, drive around looking for this place, go into this courthouse in the capital of Michigan so it's probably huge, find my way around.... I don't like this at all :( I almost wonder if I could tell the doctor it's causing me mental duress and get out of it, but that doesn't seem right. I guess I should do my civic duty :(


You are my twin at least when it comes to directions and the stress of having to go.

AND

You just reminded me that I was summond to jury duty. I would have completely forgotten if you hadn't mentioned it. I have no idea where that card is. So, now tomorrow will consist of finding it even if that means I have to look through the recycle bin and through ever piece of paper until I do. I won't stop thinking about it until I find it.



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28 Dec 2009, 12:37 pm

I just told them I was prone to making decisions based strictly on how amusing I found them at the time, and given to adopting arbitrary prejudices for the same reasons.

If they push it beyond that, I'll point out that I don't accept the government which supposedly empowers this court as being one which has any right to exist, as it is in blatant violation of it's own rules and stated goals. So I will most definitely not swear to some imaginary deity to give an arbitrarily false promise to tell the truth about anything, particularly when I am unable to exert proper scientific rigor determining the truth of said statements. If they would be willing to supply me with a proper testing facility, I will get to work on determining whether or not I can tell the truth, and nothing but the truth. Until then, I will only agree to do things that I find are funny.



riverspark
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29 Dec 2009, 12:11 am

I have always been extremely phobic of anything related to authority figures, and that includes courts/judges/juries/lawyers/etc. (I was so relieved when our county finally started sending people to a different building than the courthouse to get vehicle and boat registrations and titles taken care of!)

The first time I got called for jury duty, I was very scared, but I went anyway because I felt it was my responsibility to do my civic duty. I barely made it through all the waiting and the questioning, and then I ended up having a panic attack as they were reading the names of the people who were selected for the jury. My lower digestive system also went completely crazy, as it is prone to do when I am under extreme stress. I remember the kindness and concern of the man sitting next to me, who at that point asked if someone could "please help this young lady." Needless to say, I was not selected.

The second time I got called, a whole bunch of us sat in a waiting room together, and we never did get to the point where we were asked questions. There was a mistrial, and after half an hour, we were all sent home. I was on the verge of another panic attack when we were cut loose.

The third time I got called was a few months after my diagnosis of AS. This time, armed with my knowledge, I was able to get a note from my therapist excusing me from duty, thus neither endangering my well-being nor wasting the county's time.

I wish I could serve on a jury. To me, that is one of the things that goes along with my pursuit of "being a real adult." However, the mere thought of going through with it terrifies me to the point of nausea.