Page 1 of 1 [ 11 posts ] 

Vigilans
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 19 Jun 2008
Age: 31
Gender: Male
Posts: 12,327
Location: Montreal

22 Jul 2008, 4:19 pm

I doubt I'm the only person here who has issues with them. The only easy one I've ever had was back in the days when I worked in a bar; the interviewer (head cook) was slightly inebriated and for various reasons I find drunk people easier to deal with, since they tend to be garrulous enough to cover up my own shyness. But in any case, I was wondering if anyone had any good advice on how to deal with this situation. All the advice I get is for NT's who have no comprehension in general of the way my mind works. I should also add that all interviews where I live are almost exclusively done in French and I'm not quite bilingual...



MysteryFan3
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 8 Jun 2007
Age: 63
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,358
Location: Indiana

22 Jul 2008, 6:58 pm

MrMark has a sticky in this forum with a link to a site with good advice for getting and keeping a job. The link is http://www.nlconcepts.com/autism-jobs.htm.


_________________
To eliminate poverty, you have to eliminate at least three things: time, the bell curve and the Pauli Exclusion Principle. Have fun.


GuessWho
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 11 Aug 2007
Gender: Male
Posts: 56
Location: Alexandria VA (suitcase nuke range of Pentagon)

02 Aug 2008, 10:05 pm

Job interviews are where it hurts us.

Before I became a computer programmer, Web developer, and database designer, educated at the Maryland vocational Rehabilitation Center by Catonsville Community College faculty, I was had a Master's degree from Marshall University in Huntington, WV; I was looking for jobs, and I did interview about once every fourteen resumes.

The problem was the interviews lead nowhere, save the U.S. Census Bureau two year temporary position, recruiting any college graduate (GS-7) for a glorified telemarketing job ("Statistician" involved some use of a text-based form SAS to perform database operations) to investigate fluctuations of import/export activity by gathering info from importers/exporters that I don't even think they had to give. I wonder if form changes might have helped better.

1. The Asperger seems to have been the primary culprit, because I mock interviewed to death when I made it into the U.S. Census Bureau in February, 1998.

2. I have been obese since age 17 (but also was at Census)

3. By the age of 17 or earlier through the age 30, I had undiagnosed sleep apnea and I may have seemed sleepy (but could also take caffeine) (and also was at Census)

As for the precise sort of setting up research you read in journals, I did about one year of that inside the University before and shortly after graduation. but I never did thinktank research ever again. I do not think I ever will.

With student loans and lingering medical bills (a year earlier I survived cancer at the cost of thousands of dollars I eventuallly paid, even with thousands more written off) the State of Maryland Department of Rehabilitation Services finally said, Enough! Try computer programming! Try a community college certificate! Never mind you have a Master's.

I wonder if a judge should have simply forced me into a job I already could perform. That would have been fairer to those poor taxpayers.

After finishing six months training in Microsoft Office 97, modular programming concepts in QBASIC, normalized database design, Visual BASIC, C++, and SQL (the MRC stopped the 12 months training at 6), I got my first job interview 6 weeks later in Arlington VA and have been there nearly 9 years. Although formally trained in computer programming, and initially an free-floating asset of Corporate usually tasked to support Conference Planning's databases, I eventually transitioned to IT and picked up style sheets. Section 508 accessibility standards, Javascript, intermediate and advanced Access, formal HTML (I already knew it informally), SQL, ColdFusion, Web site architecture. SQL server, ASP, ASP.Net, and am now picking up AJAX and NIST and FIMSA Web security standards. I am approximately halfway to six figures.



johnners
Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl

User avatar

Joined: 23 Sep 2007
Age: 47
Gender: Male
Posts: 167
Location: California

04 Aug 2008, 11:14 am

I think job interviews are a probalem for nearly all aspies.

The times I've been unemployed I found it pretty easy to get interviews, I must have looked good on paper. But despite my best efforts, I never got the jobs. I would always make a point of asking for feedback, and the one thing that came up every time was something along the lines of "You didin't really seem that interested in the job".

Then I read this article (Secrets of Successful Body Language) on this site, which uses a job interview as an example of how aspies' poor body language skills can lead to misunderstandings. It was nothing short of a revelation, suddenly everything made sense.

But I've had one or two interviews since, and find that, alhough I now have this tremendously useful info to go on, when you're in the hot seat it all goes out of the window. The last interview I had, which was last week, I was determined to sit up straight, look interested, modulate my voice, make eye contact, everything. It just didn't work. I'm still waiting for them to make a decision, but I'm not very confident.

My advice to any aspie with a job interview in the offing would be to check out that article, and really think about their body language before they start thinking about any answers they will give. That would be a superb start.



GuessWho
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 11 Aug 2007
Gender: Male
Posts: 56
Location: Alexandria VA (suitcase nuke range of Pentagon)

04 Aug 2008, 5:53 pm

If we get interviewed it is because we look good on paper. I invested heavily in a number crunching research career in grad school:

* elective

Research methods:

Psychological research methods*
Sociological research methods
Educational research methods*
Evaluation research*

Statistics

Introductory statistics
analysis of variance/matrix algebra*
SPSS*
independent study in SPSS*

Theory

Sociological theory 601 and 602

Internship (one year)

suggested goals and objectives for evaluation research, and variables for questionnaires
entered data with SPSS
wrote and edited concept papers in support of grant proposals
summarized lengthy research into short briefs

subjects: gun control (supporting concealed carry laws), domestic violence dynamics in WV, recidivism, read one article on drug legalization to win the war on drugs



GuessWho
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 11 Aug 2007
Gender: Male
Posts: 56
Location: Alexandria VA (suitcase nuke range of Pentagon)

04 Aug 2008, 5:54 pm

I have proven that I will succeed either my way or their way..... number crunching or computer programming/Web design



johnners
Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl

User avatar

Joined: 23 Sep 2007
Age: 47
Gender: Male
Posts: 167
Location: California

04 Aug 2008, 6:25 pm

Thanks for the comprehensive list of your study units. Did you get an interview after all that?



Vigilans
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 19 Jun 2008
Age: 31
Gender: Male
Posts: 12,327
Location: Montreal

05 Aug 2008, 12:18 am

God, I have to work with SPSS right now I know your pain GuessWho, lol. Thanks for the advice everyone, it's much appreciated!



GuessWho
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 11 Aug 2007
Gender: Male
Posts: 56
Location: Alexandria VA (suitcase nuke range of Pentagon)

05 Aug 2008, 3:23 pm

Between thirty, thirty five interviews in varying degrees of relevance toward what I studied for.

I think I had one or two "We nailed the bastards!" moments from Independence Day (the Secretary of Defense is congratulating everybody before they have verified whether the hydrogen bomb over Houston really destroyed the UFO or not), only to have that sinking feeling, "Negative, target remains, I repeat, target remains....."

Finally the state of Maryland had enough, trained me in computers, "I said call the planes back."

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The first few resumes I fired after computer school didn't work. Neither did the first missile after uploading the virus.

After my first interview in computers, I got in. Way to go Mr. President!



GuessWho
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 11 Aug 2007
Gender: Male
Posts: 56
Location: Alexandria VA (suitcase nuke range of Pentagon)

05 Aug 2008, 3:29 pm

Of all my interviews the perfect position would have been an internsip at the Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms, Spring Mills Rd., exit 20, I-81, just outside Martinsburg, WV, while I was living in Martinsburg, WV, six miles away.

They wanted college graduates. I had that. I also had related experience.

Maybe they did not like the research of Gary Kleck, though, that supported concealed carry policies.



Aquamarine_Kitty
Toucan
Toucan

User avatar

Joined: 6 Oct 2007
Gender: Female
Posts: 278
Location: Way northern California

08 Aug 2008, 5:23 pm

I don't want to ever be interviewed for a job after seeing these dos and don'ts:

Interview Do's and Dont's

To Do's -- Arrive 15 minutes early. Late attendance is never excusable. Clarify questions. Be sure you answered the questions the employer really asked. Get the interviewer to describe the position and responsibilities early in the conversation so you can relate your skills and background to the position throughout the interview. Give your qualifications. Stress the accomplishments that are most pertinent to the job. Conduct yourself professionally. Be aware of what your body language is saying. Smile, make eye contact, don’t slouch and maintain composure. Anticipate tough questions. Prepare in advance so you can turn apparent weaknesses into strengths. Dress appropriately. Make your first impression a professional one. Ask questions throughout the interview. An interview should be a mutual exchange of information, not a one-sided conversation. Listen. This is probably the most important "do" of all. By concentrating not only on the employer’s words, but also on the tone of voice and body language, you will be able to pick up on the employer’s style. Once you understand how a hiring authority thinks, pattern your answers accordingly and you will be able to better relate to him or her.

Not To Do's -- Don’t answer vague questions. Rather than answering questions you think you hear, get the employer to be more specific and then respond. Never interrupt the employer. If you don’t have time to listen, neither does the employer. Don’t smoke, chew gum or place anything on the employer’s desk. Don’t be overly familiar, even if the employer is doing all of these things. Don’t wear heavy perfume or cologne. Don’t ramble. Long answers often make the speaker sound apologetic or indecisive. On the other hand, don’t answer questions with a simple "yes" or "no." Explain whenever possible. Do not lie. Answer questions as truthfully as possible. Do not make derogatory remarks about your present or former employers or companies.

Wow, it's almost like interviews are designed to make sure anyone on the spectrum isn't hired! I'm not looking forward to the day when I can no longer avoid entering the work force and get discriminated upon :(