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Trogluddite
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21 Aug 2018, 11:19 pm

Arevelion wrote:
I don't normally necro-post but the world needs to see this.

I'm glad you did. It made me realise that I'm thirsty and haven't got a drink!

Joking aside, this really is quite a problem for me. I can be getting a dehydration headache and simply not notice that I'm thirsty. I drink plenty when I do drink and always drink at meal times (if I notice I'm hungry, that is.) My sense of interoception seems to be terrible; I'm generally not good at reading what's going on inside my body at all, and I was told at my assessment that this and my alexithymia may be linked. If I'm hyper-focused on an interest or ruminating, there often has to be an interruption before I notice that I'm thirsty, hungry, cold, busting for a pee, etc. My initial reaction above may have been a bit tongue in cheek, but it was literally true (and I did have something to drink!)

EDITED IN:
You know, I really can be an utterly stupid nincompoop, sometimes (some would say not only sometimes, but my counsellor said I should be kind to myself.) :skull:

So, I get some kind of timer and cue myself to check my body state every once in a while. It is that f******g simple! :roll:

How on earth can someone clever enough to have written this post not grasp such a simple concept? After 48 years of doing that? And whining about it? Is there a dunce's corner that I can go and sit in for a bit? :oops:

Thankyou again, Arevelion! :D


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Spiderpig
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21 Aug 2018, 11:54 pm

Trogluddite wrote:
Joking aside, this really is quite a problem for me. I can be getting a dehydration headache and simply not notice that I'm thirsty. I drink plenty when I do drink and always drink at meal times (if I notice I'm hungry, that is.) My sense of interoception seems to be terrible; I'm generally not good at reading what's going on inside my body at all, and I was told at my assessment that this and my alexithymia may be linked. If I'm hyper-focused on an interest or ruminating, there often has to be an interruption before I notice that I'm thirsty, hungry, cold, busting for a pee, etc.


That happens to me lot, too, except the dehydration headache (I don’t get many headaches, fortunately, and when I do, they seem to have more to do with lack of sleep) and alexithymia parts. I guess it comes from not wanting to be any more of a crybaby than I already am in other ways, so I ignore internal sources of discomfort for as long as I physically can, and deep down think I really should be able to hold them far longer.

Funnily enough, this is probably my greatest obstacle to losing weight these days, as I don’t realize I’ve eaten enough till I’m about to burst. And it’s not balanced with a similar attitude about exercise, because I conveniently remember I have things to do which can’t really be done with all your muscles sore.


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DW_a_mom
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22 Aug 2018, 5:42 pm

Aspie1 wrote:
When I saw the thread title, I thought this thread was about alcohol. Oh well.

Anyway, I was a big water drinker as a child. My parents hated it, and limited my water drinking with the ruthlessness of Genghis Khan. They'd give me one glass of water, and no more than one glass, at meal times; they'd take away and pour out any water I didn't finish. If they saw me reach for water at any other times (we had a water cooler at home), they'd scream at me, slam their fist on the counter, and/or spank me. They also recruited extended family members to limit my water drinking too, and they complied. I coped by pretending to want to go to the bathroom, and gulping water straight out of the faucet.

I didn't drink much water at school, because I I was afraid to. I was worried that my teacher would see it and tell my parents, and I'd get in trouble at home. (She got me in trouble with my parents many times before, mainly over homework grades.) So I only did it when she wasn't looking, or I'd just drink tap water in the bathroom (I'm male). To add insult to the injury, my city water was poor quality. Nothing like Flint, MI, but it had an odd taste. My grandparents' house was on well water, which tasted even worse.

My parents stopped limiting my water drinking around the time I turned 10. I never understood why they did it, and I don't want to bring it up now. I figured it was just a power game on their part, with an easy pretext of "caring about my health". Me not giving them any grandchildren, effectively chopping off a part of the family tree, is a fair punishment on my part.


Yikes. From the way you describe them, your parents may have been officially crazy.

But just to help you fill in the blanks, I am going to guess a few potential reasons:

1. Money. It is possible they were paying a lot for that bottled water.
2. Bathroom issues. If you were wetting the bed, having accidents, or using the bathroom more frequently than other kids your age, the doctor may have (wrongly, obviously) told them to limit your fluid intake.

I know you think everything with parents is about power, but it really isn't. Unless they are actually crazy or some version of evil.


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DW_a_mom
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22 Aug 2018, 5:44 pm

As for necro-posting ... personal opinion, when the original post simply offered information, I don't have an issue with it. The problem is resurrecting posts that request advice, and that is because it wastes people's time as they thoughtfully try to answer back on something long resolved for someone long gone.


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Spiderpig
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22 Aug 2018, 6:38 pm

I’m constantly at risk of facing similar experiences now as an adult if any of a few certain someones decides curbing my drinking is the way to stop me from sweating “too much”, as determined purely by their subjective aesthetic criteria, of course; screw my body if it actually needs to sweat.


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Aspie1
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22 Aug 2018, 11:20 pm

DW_a_mom wrote:
But just to help you fill in the blanks, I am going to guess a few potential reasons:

1. Money. It is possible they were paying a lot for that bottled water.
2. Bathroom issues. If you were wetting the bed, having accidents, or using the bathroom more frequently than other kids your age, the doctor may have (wrongly, obviously) told them to limit your fluid intake.

1. Does not compute. If bottled water was indeed expensive, then why would they pour the water down the sink, after forcefully grabbing the cup out of my hands, when catching me drinking water "without permission"?! As well as any water they gave me at meals---one glass only!---that I didn't finish; they poured that out too. I mean, they were wasting that expensive water. Unless, of course, the pleasure they got from exerting power over me was worth the expense, I don't know. After all, "caring about your child's health" is a very easy, socially acceptable pretext for a power grab. Both to oneself and to society.

2. I didn't have bathroom problems.

I guess it's a blessing in disguise that I decided to never have a kid. I'd relish my power over him so much, he'd drop out of school and join the Army right on his 18th birthday. Then vent to fellow recruits about how much freedom he gets during Basic Training, compared to living at home. :)



Spiderpig
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23 Aug 2018, 12:55 am

Aspie1 wrote:
I'd relish my power over him so much, he'd drop out of school and join the Army right on his 18th birthday. Then vent to fellow recruits about how much freedom he gets during Basic Training, compared to living at home. :)


Maybe if he actually knew he had that option. You'd have eighteen years to keep him ignorant and helpless, and to indoctrinate him with anti-militaristic ideas. Besides, his learned helplessness would help him embrace them, because he'd know he'd have no chance standing up to a bully and would be scared shitless of having to do it for survival. It'd be fairly easy for you to convince him he couldn't get anywhere any better deal than what you had in store for him, which, of course, would always involve staying dependent on you in some way or other.

My outlook on life is very much the opposite: my parents did a pretty awesome job of making sure I'd never grow into a strong independent man, making good use of my life and succeeding at the biological game of perpetuating my branch of the family, so I want to give them the finger by managing to find a woman able and willing to have children with me, and raising them to succeed, doing with them very much the opposite of what my parents did with me.


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elsapelsa
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23 Aug 2018, 3:15 am

Aspie1 wrote:
DW_a_mom wrote:
But just to help you fill in the blanks, I am going to guess a few potential reasons:

1. Money. It is possible they were paying a lot for that bottled water.
2. Bathroom issues. If you were wetting the bed, having accidents, or using the bathroom more frequently than other kids your age, the doctor may have (wrongly, obviously) told them to limit your fluid intake.

1. Does not compute. If bottled water was indeed expensive, then why would they pour the water down the sink, after forcefully grabbing the cup out of my hands, when catching me drinking water "without permission"?! As well as any water they gave me at meals---one glass only!---that I didn't finish; they poured that out too. I mean, they were wasting that expensive water. Unless, of course, the pleasure they got from exerting power over me was worth the expense, I don't know. After all, "caring about your child's health" is a very easy, socially acceptable pretext for a power grab. Both to oneself and to society.

2. I didn't have bathroom problems.

I guess it's a blessing in disguise that I decided to never have a kid. I'd relish my power over him so much, he'd drop out of school and join the Army right on his 18th birthday. Then vent to fellow recruits about how much freedom he gets during Basic Training, compared to living at home. :)


I am intrigued now.

Could it be the supposed link between autism and obsessive overdrinking? It was a question on our assessment - whether my daughter drank too much. And I think Lorna wing's autistic daughter obsessively drank and diluted her blood to the point of having a heart attack.

Did they do it to ensure you didn't obsessively drink too much. It sounds like torture either way.

I am sorry either way for your rather horrific childhood. It could make a good memoir? Especially, the sneaking out and loosing your virginity to an escort bit.


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23 Aug 2018, 3:59 am

I hardly drink any as I drink a lot of other fluids - juices, yoghurt drinks or milk.

My aspie ex husband did drink a lot of water.

My daughter drinks the normal amount. She doesn’t stim. But is hyperactive.
On the other hand I do stim but am not hyper.


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Aspie1
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23 Aug 2018, 6:56 am

elsapelsa wrote:
Did they do it to ensure you didn't obsessively drink too much. It sounds like torture either way.

I am sorry either way for your rather horrific childhood. It could make a good memoir? Especially, the sneaking out and loosing your virginity to an escort bit.

This is precisely it: they somehow convinced themselves I was "obsessively drinking water". When in reality, I drank maybe 3 glasses a day, plus whatever I snuck from bathroom faucets. (Which wasn't too difficult; when I was out with my mother, I'd often pretend to need to use a restroom.) I rarely drank water at school, because I thought my parents told my teacher to watch over me, and I was afraid she'd rat me out if she saw me drinking out of a water fountain.

The only saving grace was that I lived in a northern state, where it rarely got hot enough for dehydration to be a hazard. God help me if I lived somewhere like Miami or Houston.

I don't want to bother writing. And the escort bit happened thanks to a loophole: my parents never bothered to check what I did online. So I was browsing escort sites, as well as trying to meet girls for free.



lostonearth35
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23 Aug 2018, 9:47 pm

I don't recall drinking any more than other kids when I was young. I do, however, recall water always tasting best when I had a glass of it just before going to sleep. :)



DW_a_mom
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24 Aug 2018, 4:40 pm

Aspie1 wrote:
DW_a_mom wrote:
But just to help you fill in the blanks, I am going to guess a few potential reasons:

1. Money. It is possible they were paying a lot for that bottled water.
2. Bathroom issues. If you were wetting the bed, having accidents, or using the bathroom more frequently than other kids your age, the doctor may have (wrongly, obviously) told them to limit your fluid intake.

1. Does not compute. If bottled water was indeed expensive, then why would they pour the water down the sink, after forcefully grabbing the cup out of my hands, when catching me drinking water "without permission"?! As well as any water they gave me at meals---one glass only!---that I didn't finish; they poured that out too. I mean, they were wasting that expensive water. Unless, of course, the pleasure they got from exerting power over me was worth the expense, I don't know. After all, "caring about your child's health" is a very easy, socially acceptable pretext for a power grab. Both to oneself and to society.

2. I didn't have bathroom problems.

I guess it's a blessing in disguise that I decided to never have a kid. I'd relish my power over him so much, he'd drop out of school and join the Army right on his 18th birthday. Then vent to fellow recruits about how much freedom he gets during Basic Training, compared to living at home. :)


While I remembered the part about pouring it down the drain, they may have considered it an "investment" in getting you to stick to the program. I suppose you will still see that as part of a power trip, but it follows what parents are taught to do. You can't let a child benefit by skirting the rules.

Mind you, I think they were off the rails having the rule at all, but to me the theory still computes. I can see why it would not compute for you.

At least you know why you wouldn't be a good parent. That is always good.


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