Private school does not mean better

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Triangular_Trees
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10 Sep 2008, 4:03 pm

I should make one clarification. Bf's mother is a religious Jew and doesn't have the nasty toward others attitude.

However I don't consider her to be one of those people who go around claiming to be very religious. I've never once heard her say something like "As a good Jew" or "I'm a woman with a good jewish heart" which you hear the nasty christians utter at every opportunity.

I suppose part of the reason that those who claim to be religious as so nasty as that they see religion as making them better than another person, and thats also the reason they go out of their way to make sure every knows that they are a good member of X religion


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lionesss
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10 Sep 2008, 4:14 pm

Triangular_Trees wrote:
I suppose part of the reason that those who claim to be religious as so nasty as that they see religion as making them better than another person, and thats also the reason they go out of their way to make sure every knows that they are a good member of X religion


Yes, YES! That really does make sense because my brother and sister in law keep saying how "wonderful" they are because of being religious. Makes me wanna puke :eew:


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liloleme
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10 Sep 2008, 9:44 pm

natesmom wrote:
Your son sounds like mine. I read another post of yours and they sound like twins! It takes forever for my son to complete the most basic of homework assignments because he always has to erase what he has done to do it better. That is with tracing and writing a row of letters, too. He is good with writing only because he has to have the letters perfect. He doesn't seem to like writing, though. He grips his pencil extremely tight and seems to struggle.


He is also not really into learning to read. He told me today that he doesn't want to learn to read until he is ten years old but he will learn more numbers :lol: . He is good with math concepts - like his dad. Before he turned five years old, he told me that he wouldn't learn to read until he turned five. Now that he is five, he changed his mind. He is a pretty funny but I need to find a way to motivate him to learn to read. I honestly think that more online games would help.


What online games does your son play??

I don't know if I would be a good home school parent but if our experience becomes worse, I would rather pull him then let him lose his great personality and feel like hell about himself. That is my worst nightmare - ultimate worst.



Here is a link to a site that I get some of his school stuff on....He loves Pokemon and they have a Pokemon matching game and some other games
http://www.dltk-kids.com/crafts/cartoons/zoo.html



Tortuga
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12 Sep 2008, 3:26 pm

Kids are cruel wherever we go. I even had some issues with other homeschooling kids. I thought the homeschooled kids were so great at first, but then some of the girls starting harrassing my son every time when we went to a weekly event. They recruited the boys into the bullying and, in the end, I stopped taking my son to that social activity.

However, through homeschooling, I did find other families with kids on the spectrum and I go to their events. To date, no one with AS or autism has bullied my son and he feels happy when he sees those kids.

Academically, homeschooling has been easier than sending him to public school. He has more of a work ethic for me. Writing is difficult for him because he has dsygraphia and he has had some reading issues, but now he's up to grade level. In public school, he was in the bottom 2nd percentile for reading. He's 50th percentile now. I think he was too stressed to learn there.



violet_yoshi
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12 Sep 2008, 10:39 pm

liloleme wrote:
natesmom wrote:
Your son sounds like mine. I read another post of yours and they sound like twins! It takes forever for my son to complete the most basic of homework assignments because he always has to erase what he has done to do it better. That is with tracing and writing a row of letters, too. He is good with writing only because he has to have the letters perfect. He doesn't seem to like writing, though. He grips his pencil extremely tight and seems to struggle.


He is also not really into learning to read. He told me today that he doesn't want to learn to read until he is ten years old but he will learn more numbers :lol: . He is good with math concepts - like his dad. Before he turned five years old, he told me that he wouldn't learn to read until he turned five. Now that he is five, he changed his mind. He is a pretty funny but I need to find a way to motivate him to learn to read. I honestly think that more online games would help.


What online games does your son play??

I don't know if I would be a good home school parent but if our experience becomes worse, I would rather pull him then let him lose his great personality and feel like hell about himself. That is my worst nightmare - ultimate worst.



Here is a link to a site that I get some of his school stuff on....He loves Pokemon and they have a Pokemon matching game and some other games
http://www.dltk-kids.com/crafts/cartoons/zoo.html


I'm not sure if these are available anymore. The Learning Company made a set of collectable PokeRoms, they were kind of like straight shaped on the sides and round at the top. Like you had to put it in the cd-rom drive diagonally, I think it's a design to make the CD-Rom thing less money. You could collect them, and they had math problems to solve on them, and when you solved the math problems your Pokemon would be added to a virtual Pokemon sanctuary on the PC. There also was a board game you could play in the Pokemon center, that asked questions having to do with other educational subjects aside from math. Here is an image of what one of them would look like:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/4 ... SS500_.jpg

They might still sell them at Best Buy, I didn't really see many of them for sale at amazon.com. I thought they were rather well done, as far as appealing to the concept of the Pokemon series.

By the way, were you aware the creator of Pokemon, Satoshi Tajiri, was diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome?



9CatMom
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13 Sep 2008, 9:54 am

You raise a good point. I happened to go to a private, Christian school. For me, it was a good decision. The academic orientation of the school appealed to me, and the teachers stressed the importance of hard work. I felt accepted there, at least by the teachers, more than at any other school I attended. There, I wasn't analyzed to death or told that medication would be the answer to my problems. Also, I was able to get away from the people who had bullied me so badly in middle school.

I am a very private person about my beliefs. I think it is the way people act, not what they say, that determines their character. I hate "Do what I say, not as I do" type attitudes, whether the person is religious or a secular humanist.

I am probably in the minority on this board, but I do understand what people are saying regarding saying one thing and doing another.



PrisonerSix
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16 Sep 2008, 1:02 pm

Tortuga wrote:
Kids are cruel wherever we go. I even had some issues with other homeschooling kids. I thought the homeschooled kids were so great at first, but then some of the girls starting harrassing my son every time when we went to a weekly event. They recruited the boys into the bullying and, in the end, I stopped taking my son to that social activity.

However, through homeschooling, I did find other families with kids on the spectrum and I go to their events. To date, no one with AS or autism has bullied my son and he feels happy when he sees those kids.

Academically, homeschooling has been easier than sending him to public school. He has more of a work ethic for me. Writing is difficult for him because he has dsygraphia and he has had some reading issues, but now he's up to grade level. In public school, he was in the bottom 2nd percentile for reading. He's 50th percentile now. I think he was too stressed to learn there.


There are good and bad kids everywhere however, homeschooling has an obvious advantage. You said he was in an activity where he was being bullied, but unlike school, you and your son had the freedom to get up and walk out and find somewhere else where he would get better treatment. I wish I had that option when I was in school.


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natesmom
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17 Sep 2008, 7:19 pm

9CatMom wrote:
You raise a good point. I happened to go to a private, Christian school. For me, it was a good decision. The academic orientation of the school appealed to me, and the teachers stressed the importance of hard work. I felt accepted there, at least by the teachers, more than at any other school I attended. There, I wasn't analyzed to death or told that medication would be the answer to my problems. Also, I was able to get away from the people who had bullied me so badly in middle school.

I am a very private person about my beliefs. I think it is the way people act, not what they say, that determines their character. I hate "Do what I say, not as I do" type attitudes, whether the person is religious or a secular humanist.

I am probably in the minority on this board, but I do understand what people are saying regarding saying one thing and doing another.


The teachers really do accept the kids at Nate's school. I have been told by several teachers that my son is such a blessing and he really makes people smile. They don't look at Autism Spectrum as a disability. They said that whatever they need to do to help him, they will. They have accomodated for him and have been so willing to help him. I guess that is a plus. I only have problems in the after school care. I am now wondering if it's because most of the kids are a lot older. There are only a few 1st grade students and no other kindergartners.

I do have to teach my son not to blow kisses to classmates, kiss the teacher on the cheek and hold hands with the kids he gets a long with. He held hands at first but I think it is a turn off with a lot of his classmates. He has a good memory so when I tell him the social rules, he doesn't do it again. He now says, "See you later, alligator:)"

I am still looking into the math and science magnet school for next year. That seems to be up his alley. Money is just so very tight. The downside is that the school is about 15 minutes driving distance away. there is a math and technology school that is closer but my son likes science more. Who knows - he is only five years old. He may get really into technology.