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MizLiz
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26 Nov 2008, 5:00 pm

I've seen it mentioned in books but can't find it on wikipedia. This... wouldn't happen to explain why I refuse to revise anything my poetry profs suggests, would it?

(the woman doesn't know what a double dactyl is... sue me)



ValMikeSmith
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26 Nov 2008, 6:17 pm

MizLiz wrote:
I've seen it mentioned in books but can't find it on wikipedia. This... wouldn't happen to explain why I refuse to revise anything my poetry profs suggests, would it?

(the woman doesn't know what a double dactyl is... sue me)


=Superego of an Autistic Person.

Superego is as I currently understand it the self-guidance-mechanism,
guiding the good things you want to do, following your goals in life,
and resisting things you don't want to do, conscience or something like it.

Methinks we have a difference in the experience of these things compared to NT's,
and we developed these concepts differently, and the term
"Autistic Superego" might just by it's definition acknowledge the reality of that concept
by giving it a name.

I'm speculating since I don't know who said it and why.
I'll make up an example, only according to my own ideas about those words.

If one of us had a robotic personality, like Data or Mr.Spock,
Then maybe we might use a logical rule-following process to live a good life
instead of seeking happiness in life, and
instead of guilty feelings telling us when we make mistakes.



Last edited by ValMikeSmith on 26 Nov 2008, 6:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.

NocturnalQuilter
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26 Nov 2008, 6:18 pm

I've never heard of an autistic super-ego.
Super-ego is defined as the following:
"The Super-ego comprises that organized part of the personality structure, mainly but not entirely unconscious, that includes the individual's ego ideals, spiritual goals, and the psychic agency (commonly called 'conscience') that criticizes and prohibits his or her drives, fantasies, feelings, and actions."

As it applies to your school issues consider this story:

When I was in college I was taking a Color and Design course informally refered to as Cut-n-Paste 101. It was the beginning theories of color and spatial design. Since I had already taken college prep architectural courses I thought my skill level was way beyond this introductory-yet-mandatory class. For one project in particular we had to draw a single-point perspective with three boxes and a horizon. Instead, I chose to do a three-point perspective with an opposing mirror image of a statue. I was asked to redo the project. I refused stating that not only did I finish the project but I showed the ability to work beyond single-point perspective. I was quite adamant about it. In conclusion I failed that portion of the class. Not because I didn't do the assignment- but because I didn't follow direction.

What I've learned later on in life is that many bosses don't care about how far above and beyond you can go in a given project but how adept you are at following orders.

In conclusion- if you are being told to change something, I would change it. I have never met a teacher or profesor who fessed up and said, "You're right and I'm wrong." Butting heads with a teacher is a sure way to catch even more hell in the future. Besides, don't think your professor isn't telling any other of his/her peers about a certain stubborn student who refuses to follow direction.



sunshower
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26 Nov 2008, 6:22 pm

Yeah, I used to have the same problem with Art classes in Primary School. I never used to follow the instructions (which were very rigid in my Primary School, not much room for creativity), and tended to do my own thing. Thus I got terrible marks for Art. In my High School, however, where we were marked for skill, originality, creativity, etc, I topped every art class I was in.


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MizLiz
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26 Nov 2008, 6:45 pm

The book where its referenced in every chapter (pretty much) is The Genesis of Artistic Creativity (can't remember the author and don't feel like looking it up) which basically makes assumptions about people like Lewis Carroll, Beethoven, Arthur Conan Doyle, etc. that they all had aspergers and one of the things that the author kept talking about was their autistic superegos and I guess it was related to some special (as in, not presented in NTs) kind of stubborness.