Has anyone attempted to divide Aspergers into subtypes?

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oblio
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04 Feb 2009, 8:00 am

makuranososhi wrote:
http://www.wrongplanet.net/postt70435.html

AutCode is one possibility.


M.


makuranososhi,

i just took that link, could you possibly try and explain to a technical notwot like me, why that discussion vaguely made sense to me and got me interested

what does this AutCode do for me?

is it worth anyone's time to pursue this?

should i be bothered at all? i appreciate your style thought and phrasing:
i trust your judgment in these matters

IT?dont.mistake.me.for.someone.who.give ... obertO.iii


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makuranososhi
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04 Feb 2009, 1:10 pm

Each code breaks down aspects into levels of degree and affect; thus a complete code gives a snapshot of the individual. These codes exist for many subgroups in society online.


M.


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mikibacsi1124
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04 Feb 2009, 4:45 pm

poopylungstuffing wrote:
I am self-centered, right-brained, artisticly and musically inclined, strong visual/associative memory, non-mathematical, an obsessive collector of things and a repetitive doer moreso than a gatherer of information...though I went through more obsessive fact-collecting phases when I was a kid...I have a funny voice, walk on my toes, stim a lot, am marked by sorta arrested emotional maturity, basic AS-ish sensory issues and avoidance of eye-contact, strong (combined-type)ADD issues, such as executive dysfunction out the wazoo...am somewhat less intelligent than a lot of the aspies in some ways...am very disorganized, somewhat extroverted, socially liberal, and not inclined to lead a very regimented life.


This actually fits me pretty closely, aside from the artistically/musically inclined part.



robo37
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04 Feb 2009, 4:58 pm

I think there are 2 types of aspies; the ones that don’t talk very often and mumble words and the ones that talk allot and sound nerdy.



mikibacsi1124
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04 Feb 2009, 5:11 pm

Here are some of the common AS traits I have:

1. Difficulty with eye contact/body language
2. Special interests
3. Stimming
4. Difficulty with tone of voice (alternating between monotone and singsong)
5. Missing the big picture
6. Needing precise directions
7. Difficulty remembering people's names and faces
8. Clumsiness
9. Sensitivity to sounds

And here are some traits that go against what tends to be expected of aspies:
1. Poor math/science abilities
2. Short attention span and lack of focus, even on things that interest me
3. Not averse to being touched
4. Not averse to small talk
5. Poor knowledge of history and geography
6. Good understanding of metaphors, sarcasm, etc.
7. IQ only slightly above average

And my AutCode:
ACa% AN- BD11241984 CA- CS= EDb FR- GDm GM=(+) HSp HT= IDb IN= LA= LG+ MA- MTd MU+ NT=(+) OCs PA= PN- RRi SC+ SDi SI5~ [email protected] SRa ST-(=) SV- VA- VB+ VSn WT+



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04 Feb 2009, 5:28 pm

Keeno wrote:
I have been looking at lectures lately by Digby Tantam, of the University of Sheffield, who does a lot of work in the AS/autism field. He distinguishes between:

Typical Asperger syndrome

Characterised by:

�� Unusual manner, gives
immediate impression of
idiosyncrasy due to
impaired nonverbal
expressiveness
�� Makes contact on own
terms
�� May discuss unusual or
particular interests
�� Problems with
unexpected or unclear

And Asperger syndrome variant/ atypical autism

Characterised by:

�� Primary abnormality is
lack of empathy, partly
due to failure of nonverbal
interpretation
(‘face blindness’)
�� Ability to make
relationships but not to
keep them
�� Overlap with Tourette,
ADHD, dysexecutive
syndrome, expressive
language problems,
dyscalculia
�� Developmental
hypofrontality?


The appointment I have for an assessment is at Professor Tantam's clinic in Sheffield; not sure yet if I will be seeing him or a colleague.

Although I consider myself mild/very high-functioning, I believe my general pattern would fit what he terms typical AS.

Some traits:

- doesn't so much have one ongoing obsession, but periodically becomes obsessed with a subject, then it goes away and I move on to the next one.

- can explain things in written form, but becomes confused, gets words mixed up and stutters slightly when trying to explain verbally.

- very poor memory for faces.

- easily confused by instructions; need them to be given clearly and step-by-step.

- notices patterns a lot.

- easily gets lost.

- has problems with certain textures.

- very attached to objects; not often attached to people and with less of a degree.

- difficulty understanding social interaction; always seem to be underlying meanings that I am missing and everyone else is grasping.

- told I sound rude or unfeeling when I was just stating a fact.

- likes making lists and sorting things into categories.

- sucks and chews objects obsessively (stim).

- cannot make 'small talk' or just 'chat'; need a specific topic.

- cannot tolerate vagueness and uncertainty.

- possible seizures*.

- clumsy; trips, walks into things easily. Could never hit or catch balls during sports.

- saying that I have an inflexible routine wouldn't be true; I can accept and manage changes fine if I have to, but must be prepared for them. If they are suddenly sprung on me, I become upset and angry.

- some difficulty with correctly interpreting expression and tone of voice; e.g., thinking people are angry when they're not.

- liking for repetition and predictability.

*I remain very curious/suspicious that the appearance - or, at least, worsening - of my problems appears to have coincided with the onset of these odd episodes I have (around the age of five or six), which, through research, I have found match descriptions of simple partial seizures.



Prof_Pretorius
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04 Feb 2009, 6:50 pm

Those that divide AS into sub-types, and those who do not.


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oblio
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05 Feb 2009, 1:02 pm

LabPet wrote:
Ditto to above posts & thank you for the book link, RarePegs and also Disgraceful. As in all individuals there are types. In botany there are genus, then species. But within those species are varieties and these can differ from geographical regions of merely miles! Yet they are all the same species but their color and other factors may vary.

With AS/HFA there are common denominators which hold us together as a diagnotic classification. Even here, on Wrong Planet, we have all sorts - but with our factor of Autism (at whatever form or level). Orchids are orchids but their varities can be diverse. However, their mechanism and evolutionary precipitants are same. The 'triad' of impairments (as per DSM-IV TR) holds but can manifest in myriads of ways. Some of our differences, within our kind, are not as overtly shown in certain individuals. Our means of expression are diverse but the message holds!

In chemistry I think of us (ASD) as a qual scheme where we follow the same path but may express as divergent speciation. And that's the beauty of Autism. By association, I just watched another video my Stephen Wiltshire (a favorite savant - the human camera). A fellow artist who is very distinguished in the Royal Academy of Art said, about Stephen's art, "Joyous....

like embroidery." Very astute, as in many colored threads intricately woven but create a Gestalt whole.


manythanks LabPet, and may i borrow on occasion?

that is about the perfect image
of what i would have imagined
autistic imagination to be&do


meanwhile, back on DSM-tracking;
some of you might be interested in the following article;

http://pn.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/cont ... 43/11/27-a


found it googling the guy my autism-socialworker
wants to put me in touch with... the feeling is... well,
mutual is not quite the word yet...., or is it... will it...


...lostinlinguisticponds/[email protected]


PS: does a frog count for a LabPet: ... "readit" ... "ribbit" ... "readit" ... ... ...


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LabPet
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05 Feb 2009, 6:57 pm

Thank you for the link_autism research is still antiquated so awareness can help with diagnostics and also better treatment.


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Shelby
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05 Feb 2009, 10:05 pm

mikibacsi1124 wrote:
Here are some of the common AS traits I have:

1. Difficulty with eye contact/body language
2. Special interests
3. Stimming
4. Difficulty with tone of voice (alternating between monotone and singsong)
5. Missing the big picture
6. Needing precise directions
7. Difficulty remembering people's names and faces
8. Clumsiness
9. Sensitivity to sounds

And here are some traits that go against what tends to be expected of aspies:
1. Poor math/science abilities
2. Short attention span and lack of focus, even on things that interest me
3. Not averse to being touched
4. Not averse to small talk
5. Poor knowledge of history and geography
6. Good understanding of metaphors, sarcasm, etc.
7. IQ only slightly above average


Wow, you just described me there! Except for not averse to being touched, I'm not crazy about being touched unless it's certain people I don't mind.



ed
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06 Feb 2009, 1:39 pm

I believe there are sub-types of aspies. One of the names given to AS was "Geek Syndrome." This described a type of person who had a high IQ, logical mind, good with computers, very well-developed language skills, but absolutely clueless when it came to dealing with others. The computer-programmer type. I definitely belong to this group, as do a lot of others here. Whatever groups we come up with, this has to be one of them.


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06 Feb 2009, 6:07 pm

I was thinking about this thread today, and I was wondering- IS anybody actually researching AS at the moment? I mean, we´re speculating about it, but I wonder if anybody is studying it? It seems to me that most of the attention these days is on "finding a cure", whereas, in actuality, it would be far more important, for all concerned, to learn and discover more about autism. Likewise, I think they also need to solve the PDD-NOS problem. What is PDD-NOS anyway? It seems to be a nondescript blanket term they use to describe any type of autism that doesn´t fall under any of the current headings. So why don´t they make new headings, and "specify" it finally? It´s awfully cumbersome to have to tell people that you have something that´s "not- otherwise- specified". There is obviously so much about autism that is not known yet, or that has not been defined and labeled.


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06 Feb 2009, 6:15 pm

Morgana wrote:
I was thinking about this thread today, and I was wondering- IS anybody actually researching AS at the moment? I mean, we´re speculating about it, but I wonder if anybody is studying it? It seems to me that most of the attention these days is on "finding a cure", whereas, in actuality, it would be far more important, for all concerned, to learn and discover more about autism. Likewise, I think they also need to solve the PDD-NOS problem. What is PDD-NOS anyway? It seems to be a nondescript blanket term they use to describe any type of autism that doesn´t fall under any of the current headings. So why don´t they make new headings, and "specify" it finally? It´s awfully cumbersome to have to tell people that you have something that´s "not- otherwise- specified". There is obviously so much about autism that is not known yet, or that has not been defined and labeled.


Simon Baron-Cohen's place, the Autism Research Centre in Cambridge, is at the forefront:

http://www.autismresearchcentre.com/vol ... efault.asp



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07 Feb 2009, 1:43 am

Morgana wrote:
I was thinking about this thread today, and I was wondering- IS anybody actually researching AS at the moment? I mean, we´re speculating about it, but I wonder if anybody is studying it? It seems to me that most of the attention these days is on "finding a cure", whereas, in actuality, it would be far more important, for all concerned, to learn and discover more about autism. Likewise, I think they also need to solve the PDD-NOS problem. What is PDD-NOS anyway? It seems to be a nondescript blanket term they use to describe any type of autism that doesn´t fall under any of the current headings. So why don´t they make new headings, and "specify" it finally? It´s awfully cumbersome to have to tell people that you have something that´s "not- otherwise- specified". There is obviously so much about autism that is not known yet, or that has not been defined and labeled.


Yes. I'm in the neurosciences at university - grad student. Autism, the common denominators, are actively being explored. And what was autism has evolved into deeper understanding. (Lack of) Theory of Mind was and is still a hallmark but the neural circuitry and microcircuitry is under analysis! I attended the Internation Neuroscience Convention last fall (Washington DC) - progress is underway. Please know this does not imply cure but rather ways to 'open channels' for those who cannot otherwise communicate/interact, and more. The Markrams are but one group of prominent researchers who have a unifying approach to autism/AS, research too about mirror neurons, etc.

But as far as diagnostics? I don't know - practitioners (who are not researchers!) are far behind. And I agree; hard to describe to another what Autism is, and what is not. Far too many misconceptions.


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07 Feb 2009, 5:09 am

Quote:
LabPet wrote:
Morgana wrote:
I was thinking about this thread today, and I was wondering- IS anybody actually researching AS at the moment? I mean, we´re speculating about it, but I wonder if anybody is studying it? It seems to me that most of the attention these days is on "finding a cure", whereas, in actuality, it would be far more important, for all concerned, to learn and discover more about autism. Likewise, I think they also need to solve the PDD-NOS problem. What is PDD-NOS anyway? It seems to be a nondescript blanket term they use to describe any type of autism that doesn´t fall under any of the current headings. So why don´t they make new headings, and "specify" it finally? It´s awfully cumbersome to have to tell people that you have something that´s "not- otherwise- specified". There is obviously so much about autism that is not known yet, or that has not been defined and labeled.


Yes. I'm in the neurosciences at university - grad student. Autism, the common denominators, are actively being explored. And what was autism has evolved into deeper understanding. (Lack of) Theory of Mind was and is still a hallmark but the neural circuitry and microcircuitry is under analysis! I attended the Internation Neuroscience Convention last fall (Washington DC) - progress is underway. Please know this does not imply cure but rather ways to 'open channels' for those who cannot otherwise communicate/interact, and more. The Markrams are but one group of prominent researchers who have a unifying approach to autism/AS, research too about mirror neurons, etc.

But as far as diagnostics? I don't know - practitioners (who are not researchers!) are far behind. And I agree; hard to describe to another what Autism is, and what is not. Far too many misconceptions.



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