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ShadesOfMe
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01 Mar 2009, 11:28 am

ladyasd wrote:
b9 wrote:
also i do not like how they do not pronounce the "T" in their words. they say the "T" sound in "gutted" by closing off their throat rather than placing their tongue tip behind their upper incisors and letting it be blown off rapidly (to make a correct "T" sound)by the air pressure of their breath.

it sounds like "guhg ed" or something (it is impossible to spell.).

I know the sound you mean, but not everyone in the UK speaks in this way - it's just the product of a couple of regional dialects!

I don't use people's names either. It's becasue I'm afraid I'll get the name wrong.
Speaking of, why do people in the UK pronounce words with an a on the end as if it were the letter er?

for example, panda. in stead of panduh it is pander. and my name is pronounced with an er sound at the end too.



MmeLePen
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01 Mar 2009, 12:03 pm

OK - any finance or economics geeks out there?

I'm in a holy war with my husband about the use of the word: "monetize" in place of "commoditize". I've been doing my research and it really is quite a divisive topic.

He says it's a commonly accepted business phrase. I say, you don't f*** with scientific, engineering, mathematic or financial terms. Go f*** with sports analogies if you want to bend the rules of language.

We're at a standoff - but I left him with this. "Go ahead and use it if you don't mind sounding like an idiot". :twisted:


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ladyasd
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03 Mar 2009, 3:18 pm

ShadesOfMe wrote:
ladyasd wrote:
b9 wrote:
also i do not like how they do not pronounce the "T" in their words. they say the "T" sound in "gutted" by closing off their throat rather than placing their tongue tip behind their upper incisors and letting it be blown off rapidly (to make a correct "T" sound)by the air pressure of their breath.

it sounds like "guhg ed" or something (it is impossible to spell.).

I know the sound you mean, but not everyone in the UK speaks in this way - it's just the product of a couple of regional dialects!

I don't use people's names either. It's becasue I'm afraid I'll get the name wrong.
Speaking of, why do people in the UK pronounce words with an a on the end as if it were the letter er?

for example, panda. in stead of panduh it is pander. and my name is pronounced with an er sound at the end too.


I don't understand the question, but if it helps, I pronounce the words "panda" and "pander" the same



protest_the_hero
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03 Mar 2009, 4:36 pm

Shog!



twoshots
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03 Mar 2009, 10:22 pm

ShadesOfMe wrote:
ladyasd wrote:
b9 wrote:
also i do not like how they do not pronounce the "T" in their words. they say the "T" sound in "gutted" by closing off their throat rather than placing their tongue tip behind their upper incisors and letting it be blown off rapidly (to make a correct "T" sound)by the air pressure of their breath.

it sounds like "guhg ed" or something (it is impossible to spell.).

I know the sound you mean, but not everyone in the UK speaks in this way - it's just the product of a couple of regional dialects!

I don't use people's names either. It's becasue I'm afraid I'll get the name wrong.
Speaking of, why do people in the UK pronounce words with an a on the end as if it were the letter er?

for example, panda. in stead of panduh it is pander. and my name is pronounced with an er sound at the end too.

That's called an "intrusive r". This is quite common in non-rhotic accents (ones in which r isn't pronounced after a vowel at the end of a syllable, as in "car" sounds like "cah"). Because r in this position isn't contrastive with just a longer vowel, speakers with these kinds of accents have no real reason *not* to pronounce an r even when one shouldn't be there. I think it might also behave to make pronunciation smoother sometimes, like how an "n" is added after "a" before a vowel. You can find similar intrusive r in some non-rhotic American accents as well, specifically I believe it can occur in non-rhotic NYC accents.


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twoshots
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03 Mar 2009, 10:32 pm

ladyasd wrote:
b9 wrote:
also i do not like how they do not pronounce the "T" in their words. they say the "T" sound in "gutted" by closing off their throat rather than placing their tongue tip behind their upper incisors and letting it be blown off rapidly (to make a correct "T" sound)by the air pressure of their breath.

it sounds like "guhg ed" or something (it is impossible to spell.).

I know the sound you mean, but not everyone in the UK speaks in this way - it's just the product of a couple of regional dialects!

The glottal plosive is a common allophone of t in some positions; although it rarely appears intervocally outside of a few English accents, it is quite common in some places and you may not realize you're using it. It appears in my dialect frequently near n and at the end of words.
fit-> fIʔ
Mutant->mjuʔənʔ


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MmeLePen
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03 Mar 2009, 10:32 pm

I don't think regional accents should count. That's not really fair.

I LIKE NY and Boston accents - but Southern accents are like knitting needles in my ears. But that's just me! A lot of people are *enchanted* by Southern accents.

I also like Alberta accents. Yet Seattle (blue collar) accents make me want to kick something.

And don't even get me started on Fresno accents!

Point is - maybe accents should be off-limits.


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hartzofspace
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03 Mar 2009, 11:23 pm

MmeLePen wrote:
I LIKE NY and Boston accents - but Southern accents are like knitting needles in my ears.


:lol: I feel the same way about Southern accents. Although I find that I have heard different kinds. One kind, which I find is rarely heard, is enchanting. The rest, well...


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Skilpadde
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05 Mar 2009, 9:50 am

Acacia wrote:
It's not the word itself or the connotation, but the actual sounds that make up certain words that annoy me...

This seems to be partially a sound-sensitivity issue, and partially a synaesthetic one... For me, sounds transmute into color and emotion, and some of these associations can be unpleasant.



Synaesthesia is fascinating! (Unfortunately the closest I get to it is that to me A and 4 seems red, B and 3 are blue, E is a deeper blue, C is yellow, G golden and F a deep green, while 7 is pale green. Whether this has anything to do with synaestesia or if it is simply a preference, I have no idea.)

I would love to learn more about it.

Would you mind elaborate and give any concrete example of how a sound transmutes into color and emotion?



ImTheGuyThatDidThat
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05 Mar 2009, 10:04 am

Probably not something everyone gets annoyed over, but
alot of people use the term "double die" in numismatics.
This is so wrong, the correct term is "doubled die", might not
sound like much but theres a huuge difference.



MmeLePen
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05 Mar 2009, 10:11 am

hartzofspace wrote:
MmeLePen wrote:
I LIKE NY and Boston accents - but Southern accents are like knitting needles in my ears.


:lol: I feel the same way about Southern accents. Although I find that I have heard different kinds. One kind, which I find is rarely heard, is enchanting. The rest, well...


Educated Middle Tennessee (Nashville) is nice. An educated gay male Atlanta accent is nice. Savannah is nice - *and bless Paula Deen's heart* - but she has a Statesboro accent (South Georgia). (The old knitting needles in the ears).

OH - and I LOVE Louisiana accents. (Except Britney Spears trailer trash accent - oh, that's so mean...) That is like the sexiest accent ever. Like, remember Dennis Quaid in the "Big Easy"? Anyone? Anyone? (Yeah - I'm dating myself.) :( And a really cute guy with a Texas accent is a turn on - but now we're getting into the Western states.


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Kimmy
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05 Mar 2009, 10:19 am

When people say "Beasty" when meaning awesome

Why not just say awesome?


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05 Mar 2009, 2:22 pm

the word.... ballin.... i cant stand it... or my brothers saying GOT EM COACH... :?


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hartzofspace
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05 Mar 2009, 11:19 pm

[quote="MmeLePen" Like, remember Dennis Quaid in the "Big Easy"? Anyone? Anyone? (Yeah - I'm dating myself.) :( And a really cute guy with a Texas accent is a turn on - but now we're getting into the Western states.[/quote]

Yes, Dennis Quaid in "Big Easy" is a good example. Smooth on the eardrums! 8)


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eristocrat
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06 Mar 2009, 12:25 am

firstly
secondly,etc.
amidst, amongst
ironical

Basically whenever someone adds a syllable or letters to the end of a word in a vain attempt to look smart and not like the f***wit both I and they know they are. Also, "extant" in most instances.



MmeLePen
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06 Mar 2009, 12:35 am

eristocrat wrote:
firstly
secondly,etc.
amidst, amongst
ironical

Basically whenever someone adds a syllable or letters to the end of a word in a vain attempt to look smart and not like the f***wit both I and they know they are. Also, "extant" in most instances.


Bummer. I do that. :( (But WTF is extant???)

But only because I am a "bard" - a compulsive story teller/wordsmith. Honestly, where I come from - it only makes me sound like a geek/freak.

If I could turn it off - I would - but only as a gay person would turn off their gayness.

PS: "Firstly" and "Ironical" sound dumb - but I looked them up and they appear to be legit. But I didn't check the Chicago School...


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