Page 1 of 1 [ 13 posts ] 

Sublyme
Sea Gull
Sea Gull

User avatar

Joined: 23 Apr 2008
Age: 38
Gender: Female
Posts: 229

24 Feb 2009, 4:31 pm

So this morning I was discussing a new product with my boss that she needs for a presentation at some point in the near future. When I asked her when would like to see samples by, she says, "not tomorrow, but the day after tomorrow."

I though about it for a moment and decided it must be a big rush, because 48 hours seemed like a really short amount of time to formulate a new product, even if it was just a concept for a presentation.

So I got working right away. Worked through lunch. I even freaked out a coworker by telling her our boss needed samples for the presentation by Thursday.

I showed her what I had made this afternoon, we decided it needed improvement (she hadn't even given me a prototype yet).... and she says..."don't worry...we have plenty of time."

"[email protected][email protected]#"....."No we don't, we only have until Thursday!! !!" I say very matter-of-factly...

In walks my coworker also was rushing to get her samples ready and hears what we are talking about. She tells my boss "you never said anything about Thursday, I don't have enough time"

My boss laughs. "Where did you get Thursday from??"

I tell her she said she didn't need to see the samples tomorrow but "the day after tomorrow. Which is indeed in fact...Thursday"...

Both of them start laughing hysterically...not knowing what they were laughing at I just started to laugh too (I do that a lot). Then it occured to me....

My boss didn't mean she needed the samples "the day after tomorrow." It meant "start thinking about what you want to do, and I want to see the samples in a couple of weeks." It was a figure of speech.....gah...

I think they make me crazy on purpose......



MONKEY
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 3 Jan 2009
Age: 27
Gender: Female
Posts: 9,896
Location: Stoke, England (sometimes :P)

24 Feb 2009, 4:35 pm

:lmao: :roll:

I didn't know that was also used as a figure of speech. The other times I heard the words "day after tomorrow" it was meant as in two days (although I think they were)


_________________
What film do atheists watch on Christmas?
Coincidence on 34th street.


MrMisanthrope
Deinonychus
Deinonychus

User avatar

Joined: 22 Feb 2009
Age: 52
Gender: Male
Posts: 340
Location: The Eastern Outskirts of the Daley Empire

24 Feb 2009, 4:39 pm

I would have blugeoned the both of them to death with a stapler...


_________________
Malum Prohibitum, Malum Habenae Regum Est.
I'm not Jesus. Stop punishing me for other people's sins.

True Liberty Expressed as Fiction: http://www.bigheadpress.com/tpbtgn


pandd
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 15 Jul 2006
Age: 47
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,430

24 Feb 2009, 5:14 pm

WTF?!

That is ridiculous.

Why would the day after tomorrow mean some day other than the one that follows tomorrow?

I appreciate that we can sometimes struggle with being overly-literal, but I honestly cannot see how you were supposed to interpret what was said as being intended non-literally.

Why say the day after tomorrow, why not a few weeks, or soonish or some other vague time measure instead of a non-literally intended specific time frame?



24 Feb 2009, 5:17 pm

I thought the day after tomorrow meant the day after tomorrow. :?



Learning2Survive
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 19 Feb 2009
Age: 33
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,777

24 Feb 2009, 5:25 pm

i;ve been embarassed at work too many times i stopped c ounting..



LuckyBunny
Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl

User avatar

Joined: 17 Nov 2008
Age: 36
Gender: Male
Posts: 141
Location: London, UK

24 Feb 2009, 5:27 pm

I'm normally ok with these things, but this one I'm not familiar with. I would react the same, without a doubt.

There's nothing remotely poetic about misleading people, so I bite my thumb at your boss. (biting thumb - Shakespearean insult, like the middle finger nowadays).

((((hugs))))

~Loving Light~



Emor
Velociraptor
Velociraptor

User avatar

Joined: 27 Jan 2009
Gender: Female
Posts: 464

24 Feb 2009, 5:28 pm

pandd wrote:
WTF?!

That is ridiculous.

Why would the day after tomorrow mean some day other than the one that follows tomorrow?

I appreciate that we can sometimes struggle with being overly-literal, but I honestly cannot see how you were supposed to interpret what was said as being intended non-literally.

Why say the day after tomorrow, why not a few weeks, or soonish or some other vague time measure instead of a non-literally intended specific time frame?

I completely agree. I don't get that.
EMZ=]



MmeLePen
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 8 Feb 2009
Age: 55
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,129
Location: R.I.P.

24 Feb 2009, 6:52 pm

Sublyme wrote:
So this morning I was discussing a new product with my boss that she needs for a presentation at some point in the near future. When I asked her when would like to see samples by, she says, "not tomorrow, but the day after tomorrow."

I though about it for a moment and decided it must be a big rush, because 48 hours seemed like a really short amount of time to formulate a new product, even if it was just a concept for a presentation.

So I got working right away. Worked through lunch. I even freaked out a coworker by telling her our boss needed samples for the presentation by Thursday.

I showed her what I had made this afternoon, we decided it needed improvement (she hadn't even given me a prototype yet).... and she says..."don't worry...we have plenty of time."

"[email protected][email protected]#"....."No we don't, we only have until Thursday!! !!" I say very matter-of-factly...

In walks my coworker also was rushing to get her samples ready and hears what we are talking about. She tells my boss "you never said anything about Thursday, I don't have enough time"

My boss laughs. "Where did you get Thursday from??"

I tell her she said she didn't need to see the samples tomorrow but "the day after tomorrow. Which is indeed in fact...Thursday"...

Both of them start laughing hysterically...not knowing what they were laughing at I just started to laugh too (I do that a lot). Then it occured to me....

My boss didn't mean she needed the samples "the day after tomorrow." It meant "start thinking about what you want to do, and I want to see the samples in a couple of weeks." It was a figure of speech.....gah...

I think they make me crazy on purpose......


You poor thing! Sounds like my life. I have a hard time understanding when people put a timeline to "thinking about it". How can you schedule those kind of things?



mitharatowen
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 21 Oct 2008
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,675
Location: Arizona

24 Feb 2009, 6:53 pm

I've never heard "the day after tomorrow" used as a figure of speech! 8O



Sublyme
Sea Gull
Sea Gull

User avatar

Joined: 23 Apr 2008
Age: 38
Gender: Female
Posts: 229

24 Feb 2009, 7:20 pm

Apparently I was supposed to tell by the tone of her voice that she didn't literally mean "the day after tomorrow," but rather it was a way of her telling me it wasn't a huge rush ("tomorrow" would have been the rush)...the "day after tomorrow" means it's still a priority but I don't need to rush.....I see the analogy now that I think about it...

Grrr.....why not just tell me what she meant. Now when she really needs something "the day after tomorrow" I'm going to get all confused.

I didn't think "the day after tomorrow" was ever used as a figure of speech.....maybe it is in her first language (English is her second language).

Anyway. At least I got a good head start on the project.



24 Feb 2009, 7:25 pm

Sublyme wrote:
Apparently I was supposed to tell by the tone of her voice that she didn't literally mean "the day after tomorrow," but rather it was a way of her telling me it wasn't a huge rush ("tomorrow" would have been the rush)...the "day after tomorrow" means it's still a priority but I don't need to rush.....I see the analogy now that I think about it...

Grrr.....why not just tell me what she meant. Now when she really needs something "the day after tomorrow" I'm going to get all confused.

I didn't think "the day after tomorrow" was ever used as a figure of speech.....maybe it is in her first language (English is her second language).
Anyway. At least I got a good head start on the project.



Then it wasn't AS then you did, it was just a simple misunderstanding any American would have. Anyone would take a phrase literal their country doesn't have. Each country has their own phrases. heck in our country there is no such thing as "Pull up your socks" as a phrase. It will get taken literal here if someone from another country said it to one of us.



Sublyme
Sea Gull
Sea Gull

User avatar

Joined: 23 Apr 2008
Age: 38
Gender: Female
Posts: 229

24 Feb 2009, 7:46 pm

I think any of my coworkers would have taken that literally too (except maybe the one who was laughing with my boss). I asked with another coworker, also speaks my boss's native language, and she said that wasn't a figure of speech in Russian, and she said she would have also been confused.

I have a hard enough time with normal figures of speech, but I like to think I've gotten much better. It's not any eaiser when your boss makes up her own figures of speech.....

I just felt like such an idiot. She already thinks I'm retarded....