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Where would you prefer to live?
Very Large City (10 million people or more) 9%  9%  [ 8 ]
Large City (3 million to ~9.9 million people) 15%  15%  [ 14 ]
Regular City (1 million to ~2.9 million people) 13%  13%  [ 12 ]
Small City (200,000 to 999,999 people) 10%  10%  [ 9 ]
Large Town (100,000 to 199,999 people) 4%  4%  [ 4 ]
Regular Town (40,000 to 99,999 people) 5%  5%  [ 5 ]
Small Town (20,000 to 39,999 people) 9%  9%  [ 8 ]
Village (less than 20,000 people) 11%  11%  [ 10 ]
Rural Area 23%  23%  [ 21 ]
Total votes : 91

Amicitia
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01 May 2009, 3:08 pm

I live in a "small town" near a "large city". I hate it. I'd rather live somewhere much smaller.



MathGirl
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01 May 2009, 3:16 pm

hostilebanana wrote:
The older I get, the smaller the town that I would prefer to live in. I was wondering how the rest of you feel.

Hm, I'm the opposite. Living in the countryside was my ultimate wish when I was younger, but now I prefer the city.
A regular city would be the best since there is not as much noise and pollution as in large cities, but everything's still within your reach.



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01 May 2009, 6:50 pm

I lived in a rural area in new england. Not much privacy. I love living in cities. Big cities. Though were I live now is pretty ideal, I live close to museums, fifteen minute bus or train ride to the biggest museum in the world. Its great. I grew up in museums and love public transportation, so big cities is the only way to go for me.



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01 May 2009, 7:40 pm

Amicitia wrote:
I live in a "small town" near a "large city". I hate it. I'd rather live somewhere much smaller.


Hmmm... I live in a small town near a large metro area and I love it! I really don't need to leave my comfortable little world, but if I need something rather specialized, I have lots of resources fairly nearby to get this. I live minutes from a National Forest and two wildernesses when I want to disappear, am probably about forty minutes each from the desert and the ocean, but not too far from big theaters. Real public transportation now reaches this far and I can ride my bike to the train. I am a true child of the suburbs--not at home in big city, but not comfortable with the lack of resources in rural areas.


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01 May 2009, 7:51 pm

I would like to live in or near a large city. Just imagine how cool it would be. It would be easy to earn a living.



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01 May 2009, 8:41 pm

I live in a rural area outside of a small city of approximately 20,000 people. I love living in the country.

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vivinator
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01 May 2009, 8:43 pm

the relevant #'s are the metro area pops, not city pops.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Sta ... litan_area

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Sta ... litan_area
Top 25

As of July 2008, 83.6 % of the population of the United States lives in a Metropolitan area.[2] The following is a list of the 25 most populous metropolitan statistical areas and metropolitan divisions in the United States, according to the July 1, 2008 U.S. Census Bureau estimates:[3]
Rank Metropolitan Area Metropolitan Division State(s) Population
1 New York–Northern New Jersey–Long Island NY–NJ–PA 19,006,798
Edison NJ 2,325,224
Nassau–Suffolk NY 2,863,849
Newark–Union NJ-PA 2,121,076
New York–White Plains–Wayne NY-NJ 11,696,649
2 Los Angeles–Long Beach–Santa Ana CA 12,872,808
Los Angeles–Long Beach–Glendale 9,862,049
Santa Ana–Anaheim–Irvine 3,010,759
3 Chicago–Naperville–Joliet IL–IN–WI 9,569,624
Chicago–Naperville–Joliet IL 7,990,248
Gary IN 702,458
Lake County–Kenosha County IL–WI 876,918
4 Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington TX 6,300,006
Dallas–Plano–Irving 4,226,003
Fort Worth–Arlington 2,074,003
5 Philadelphia–Camden–Wilmington PA–NJ–DE–MD 5,838,471
Camden NJ 1,250,569
Philadelphia PA 3,892,194
Wilmington DE–MD–NJ 695,708
6 Houston–Sugar Land–Baytown TX 5,728,143
7 Miami–Fort Lauderdale–Pompano Beach FL 5,414,772
Fort Lauderdale–Pompano Beach–Deerfield Beach 1,751,234
Miami–Miami Beach–Kendall 2,398,245
West Palm Beach–Boca Raton–Boynton Beach 1,265,293
8 Atlanta–Sandy Springs–Marietta GA 5,376,285
9 Washington–Arlington–Alexandria DC–VA–MD–WV 5,358,130
Bethesda-Gaithersburg–Frederick MD 1,176,401
Washington–Arlington–Alexandria DC–MD–VA–WV 4,181,729
10 Boston–Cambridge–Quincy MA–NH 4,522,858
Boston–Quincy MA 1,884,659
Cambridge–Newton–Framingham 1,482,478
Peabody 736,457
Rockingham County–Strafford County NH 419,264
11 Detroit–Warren–Livonia MI 4,425,110
Detroit–Livonia–Dearborn 1,949,929
Warren–Troy–Farmington Hills 2,475,181
12 Phoenix–Mesa–Scottsdale AZ 4,281,899
13 San Francisco–Oakland–Fremont CA 4,274,531
Oakland–Fremont–Hayward 2,504,071
San Francisco–San Mateo–Redwood City 1,770,460
14 Riverside–San Bernardino–Ontario CA 4,115,871
15 Seattle–Tacoma–Bellevue WA 3,344,813
Seattle–Bellevue–Everett 2,559,174
Tacoma 785,639
16 Minneapolis–St. Paul–Bloomington MN–WI 3,229,878
17 San Diego–Carlsbad–San Marcos[4] CA 3,001,072
18 St. Louis MO–IL 2,816,710
19 Tampa–St. Petersburg–Clearwater FL 2,733,761
20 Baltimore–Towson MD 2,667,117
21 Denver–Aurora CO 2,506,626
22 Pittsburgh PA 2,351,192
23 Portland–Vancouver–Beaverton OR–WA 2,207,462
24 Cincinnati–Middletown OH-KY-IN 2,155,137
25 Sacramento CA 2,109,832


all US MSA's and pop's

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Table_of_U ... ical_Areas

world urban areas over 2 mil ranking:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_ur ... population


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-as of now official dx is ADHD (inattentive type) but said ADD (314.00) on the dx paper, PDD-NOS and was told looks like I have NLD


ZEGH8578
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01 May 2009, 8:57 pm

vivinator wrote:
the relevant #'s are the metro area pops, not city pops.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Sta ... litan_area

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Sta ... litan_area
Top 25

As of July 2008, 83.6 % of the population of the United States lives in a Metropolitan area.[2] The following is a list of the 25 most populous metropolitan statistical areas and metropolitan divisions in the United States, according to the July 1, 2008 U.S. Census Bureau estimates:[3]
Rank Metropolitan Area Metropolitan Division State(s) Population
1 New York–Northern New Jersey–Long Island NY–NJ–PA 19,006,798
Edison NJ 2,325,224
Nassau–Suffolk NY 2,863,849
Newark–Union NJ-PA 2,121,076
New York–White Plains–Wayne NY-NJ 11,696,649
2 Los Angeles–Long Beach–Santa Ana CA 12,872,808
Los Angeles–Long Beach–Glendale 9,862,049
Santa Ana–Anaheim–Irvine 3,010,759
3 Chicago–Naperville–Joliet IL–IN–WI 9,569,624
Chicago–Naperville–Joliet IL 7,990,248
Gary IN 702,458
Lake County–Kenosha County IL–WI 876,918
4 Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington TX 6,300,006
Dallas–Plano–Irving 4,226,003
Fort Worth–Arlington 2,074,003
5 Philadelphia–Camden–Wilmington PA–NJ–DE–MD 5,838,471
Camden NJ 1,250,569
Philadelphia PA 3,892,194
Wilmington DE–MD–NJ 695,708
6 Houston–Sugar Land–Baytown TX 5,728,143
7 Miami–Fort Lauderdale–Pompano Beach FL 5,414,772
Fort Lauderdale–Pompano Beach–Deerfield Beach 1,751,234
Miami–Miami Beach–Kendall 2,398,245
West Palm Beach–Boca Raton–Boynton Beach 1,265,293
8 Atlanta–Sandy Springs–Marietta GA 5,376,285
9 Washington–Arlington–Alexandria DC–VA–MD–WV 5,358,130
Bethesda-Gaithersburg–Frederick MD 1,176,401
Washington–Arlington–Alexandria DC–MD–VA–WV 4,181,729
10 Boston–Cambridge–Quincy MA–NH 4,522,858
Boston–Quincy MA 1,884,659
Cambridge–Newton–Framingham 1,482,478
Peabody 736,457
Rockingham County–Strafford County NH 419,264
11 Detroit–Warren–Livonia MI 4,425,110
Detroit–Livonia–Dearborn 1,949,929
Warren–Troy–Farmington Hills 2,475,181
12 Phoenix–Mesa–Scottsdale AZ 4,281,899
13 San Francisco–Oakland–Fremont CA 4,274,531
Oakland–Fremont–Hayward 2,504,071
San Francisco–San Mateo–Redwood City 1,770,460
14 Riverside–San Bernardino–Ontario CA 4,115,871
15 Seattle–Tacoma–Bellevue WA 3,344,813
Seattle–Bellevue–Everett 2,559,174
Tacoma 785,639
16 Minneapolis–St. Paul–Bloomington MN–WI 3,229,878
17 San Diego–Carlsbad–San Marcos[4] CA 3,001,072
18 St. Louis MO–IL 2,816,710
19 Tampa–St. Petersburg–Clearwater FL 2,733,761
20 Baltimore–Towson MD 2,667,117
21 Denver–Aurora CO 2,506,626
22 Pittsburgh PA 2,351,192
23 Portland–Vancouver–Beaverton OR–WA 2,207,462
24 Cincinnati–Middletown OH-KY-IN 2,155,137
25 Sacramento CA 2,109,832


all US MSA's and pop's

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Table_of_U ... ical_Areas

world urban areas over 2 mil ranking:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_ur ... population


joy!
another population-count fanatic :oops:


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FireBird
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01 May 2009, 9:54 pm

I live in the middle of nowhere, literally. I call it "Cow Town" as there are more cows than people. The population of "humans" is only around 3-5,000 and there's a town right next to us that has a population of get this people...200! I'm around 90 minutes outside Seattle, WA. I would like to live closer to a big city or in a "town" around 100-200,000 people. From where I live now, I always have to travel far to where I want to get. The best thing about my middle of nowhere area is that my house is cool, you can't really get that in cities....just apartments. My house is HUGE but at the same time very cheap. When I first moooooved here in 2000 (or in the local area its more like 1800 {back then there were some areas that haven't invented electicity!}), my family and I was able to get this house for a little over $260,000 and its 4,000 sq. ft.! They were desperate to get rid of the house and the location made it cheap. If it was in a bigger area now, it would probably go for over a million dollars.....even though the house prices went down for awhile. Cows are your best friend out here! They are probably "plotting" to give everyone "mad cow disease" in the middle of nowhere! Only in Cow Town!



vivinator
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01 May 2009, 10:15 pm

interesting i thought i'd see a lot of small town because of sensory issues.
me probably urban burb. baltimore strikes me as somewhat unsafe even in a good area. not that you'd get murdered but perhaps mugged. dc is better in that regard. dc also has decent public trans.
i have a hard time aprking due to visual-spatial issues and crazy city driving/traffic/maneuvering through narrow spaces would not be good for me.

i'd say a metro area between say 3 and 6 mil would be good


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All men are frauds. The only difference between them is that some admit it. I myself deny it.

-HL Mencken


-as of now official dx is ADHD (inattentive type) but said ADD (314.00) on the dx paper, PDD-NOS and was told looks like I have NLD


Last edited by vivinator on 01 May 2009, 10:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.

vivinator
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01 May 2009, 10:15 pm

ZEGH8578 wrote:
vivinator wrote:
the relevant #'s are the metro area pops, not city pops.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Sta ... litan_area

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Sta ... litan_area
Top 25

As of July 2008, 83.6 % of the population of the United States lives in a Metropolitan area.[2] The following is a list of the 25 most populous metropolitan statistical areas and metropolitan divisions in the United States, according to the July 1, 2008 U.S. Census Bureau estimates:[3]
Rank Metropolitan Area Metropolitan Division State(s) Population
1 New York–Northern New Jersey–Long Island NY–NJ–PA 19,006,798
Edison NJ 2,325,224
Nassau–Suffolk NY 2,863,849
Newark–Union NJ-PA 2,121,076
New York–White Plains–Wayne NY-NJ 11,696,649
2 Los Angeles–Long Beach–Santa Ana CA 12,872,808
Los Angeles–Long Beach–Glendale 9,862,049
Santa Ana–Anaheim–Irvine 3,010,759
3 Chicago–Naperville–Joliet IL–IN–WI 9,569,624
Chicago–Naperville–Joliet IL 7,990,248
Gary IN 702,458
Lake County–Kenosha County IL–WI 876,918
4 Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington TX 6,300,006
Dallas–Plano–Irving 4,226,003
Fort Worth–Arlington 2,074,003
5 Philadelphia–Camden–Wilmington PA–NJ–DE–MD 5,838,471
Camden NJ 1,250,569
Philadelphia PA 3,892,194
Wilmington DE–MD–NJ 695,708
6 Houston–Sugar Land–Baytown TX 5,728,143
7 Miami–Fort Lauderdale–Pompano Beach FL 5,414,772
Fort Lauderdale–Pompano Beach–Deerfield Beach 1,751,234
Miami–Miami Beach–Kendall 2,398,245
West Palm Beach–Boca Raton–Boynton Beach 1,265,293
8 Atlanta–Sandy Springs–Marietta GA 5,376,285
9 Washington–Arlington–Alexandria DC–VA–MD–WV 5,358,130
Bethesda-Gaithersburg–Frederick MD 1,176,401
Washington–Arlington–Alexandria DC–MD–VA–WV 4,181,729
10 Boston–Cambridge–Quincy MA–NH 4,522,858
Boston–Quincy MA 1,884,659
Cambridge–Newton–Framingham 1,482,478
Peabody 736,457
Rockingham County–Strafford County NH 419,264
11 Detroit–Warren–Livonia MI 4,425,110
Detroit–Livonia–Dearborn 1,949,929
Warren–Troy–Farmington Hills 2,475,181
12 Phoenix–Mesa–Scottsdale AZ 4,281,899
13 San Francisco–Oakland–Fremont CA 4,274,531
Oakland–Fremont–Hayward 2,504,071
San Francisco–San Mateo–Redwood City 1,770,460
14 Riverside–San Bernardino–Ontario CA 4,115,871
15 Seattle–Tacoma–Bellevue WA 3,344,813
Seattle–Bellevue–Everett 2,559,174
Tacoma 785,639
16 Minneapolis–St. Paul–Bloomington MN–WI 3,229,878
17 San Diego–Carlsbad–San Marcos[4] CA 3,001,072
18 St. Louis MO–IL 2,816,710
19 Tampa–St. Petersburg–Clearwater FL 2,733,761
20 Baltimore–Towson MD 2,667,117
21 Denver–Aurora CO 2,506,626
22 Pittsburgh PA 2,351,192
23 Portland–Vancouver–Beaverton OR–WA 2,207,462
24 Cincinnati–Middletown OH-KY-IN 2,155,137
25 Sacramento CA 2,109,832


all US MSA's and pop's

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Table_of_U ... ical_Areas

world urban areas over 2 mil ranking:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_ur ... population


joy!
another population-count fanatic :oops:


lol somewhat!


_________________
All men are frauds. The only difference between them is that some admit it. I myself deny it.

-HL Mencken


-as of now official dx is ADHD (inattentive type) but said ADD (314.00) on the dx paper, PDD-NOS and was told looks like I have NLD


dougn
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01 May 2009, 10:17 pm

I've spent my entire life living in the third-largest urban area in the world. I've never desired to live anywhere "smaller."

(I have lived in the suburbs that whole time and I would like to move to a denser area. I don't like suburbia.)

vivinator wrote:
the relevant #'s are the metro area pops, not city pops.

In the US the (even more) relevant list is actually this one. The list of MSAs ignores CSAs (combined statistical areas), which supersede MSAs.

Also, I would point out that there is a major difference between a metropolitan area and an urban area. An urban area is actually a contiguous urbanized space. A metropolitan area can include one or more urban areas as well as rural areas. In some cases the urban area is even smaller than a city proper (some cities proper include rural areas), in other cases it spans several cities proper (for example the New York urban area, which is only slightly smaller than the New York metropolitan area, spans several states and many, many local government units). A metropolitan area is more defined by its labor market (e.g. an urban area and its "commuter belt").



vivinator
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01 May 2009, 11:18 pm

dougn wrote:
I've spent my entire life living in the third-largest urban area in the world. I've never desired to live anywhere "smaller."

(I have lived in the suburbs that whole time and I would like to move to a denser area. I don't like suburbia.)

vivinator wrote:
the relevant #'s are the metro area pops, not city pops.

In the US the (even more) relevant list is actually this one. The list of MSAs ignores CSAs (combined statistical areas), which supersede MSAs.

Also, I would point out that there is a major difference between a metropolitan area and an urban area. An urban area is actually a contiguous urbanized space. A metropolitan area can include one or more urban areas as well as rural areas. In some cases the urban area is even smaller than a city proper (some cities proper include rural areas), in other cases it spans several cities proper (for example the New York urban area, which is only slightly smaller than the New York metropolitan area, spans several states and many, many local government units). A metropolitan area is more defined by its labor market (e.g. an urban area and its "commuter belt").


is CSA really more relevant? well at least in terms of a what an actual city would feel like? I mean look at dtown Baltimore (not sure if you've been). it certainly doesn't reflect what a dtown of a cit with a relevant area of more than 8 million should be (well for newish cities aka Dallas, Phoenix, Houston, Charlotte, Atlanta). at least in those terms the MSA seems more relevant.

Oh and thanks for explaining the diff between a metro and an urban area. It's easy to just use the terms interchangeably.


so urban area=MSA?

metro area=PCSA?

what about CSA and PMSA?
is PMSA in use anymore?

I spend so much time on urbna forums one would think i'd know this


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All men are frauds. The only difference between them is that some admit it. I myself deny it.

-HL Mencken


-as of now official dx is ADHD (inattentive type) but said ADD (314.00) on the dx paper, PDD-NOS and was told looks like I have NLD


dougn
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02 May 2009, 5:14 am

vivinator wrote:
is CSA really more relevant? well at least in terms of a what an actual city would feel like?
Neither one is really relevant, they're both just slightly different versions of what I described as "metropolitan area."

vivinator wrote:
so urban area=MSA?

metro area=PCSA?

No.

They're all metro area statistics.

PCSA is a more generic term referring to whatever type of census area is the primary one in that place - it can be a CSA, an MSA or a µSA (a CSA is made up of more than one MSA and/or µSA).

The urban area is often much smaller than a CSA or MSA.

Here (warning: pdf file) is a list of world urban areas (not perfect, but the best I know of).

Here is a US-only list of urban areas, unfortunately using old 2000 Census data and not the latest 2007 data.

As you can see, Baltimore and Washington are in the same metropolitan area but they form two separate urban areas - as is pretty clear to anyone who has been there, since there is non-urbanized space between them.

Same goes for San Francisco-Oakland and San Jose. Again, quite obvious if you've been there.

In contrast, the New York metropolitan area is also more or less a contiguous urban area, with rural areas only on the fringes.

In contrast virtually the entire New York



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02 May 2009, 6:38 am

In some ways I've got the best of both worlds.I live in a 'regular' size town which is part of
an urban area (Greater Glasgow) of 2 million with all the facilities you'd expect. Despite that I'm still within 30 minutes travel from relatively peaceful countryside.


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