Why do we call a meltdown a meltdown ?

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Should the term "meltdown" be withdrawn from service and replaced with something else ?
Yes 17%  17%  [ 6 ]
No 54%  54%  [ 19 ]
Do not know 29%  29%  [ 10 ]
Total votes : 35

conundrum
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15 Feb 2015, 8:41 pm

lostinlove wrote:
I also have meltdowns and shut downs and consider them good terms. My meltdowns have also resulted in the loss of friendships. I find I tend to shut down in order to try and prevent a meltdown, not sure if anyone else does that?


Maybe - since I tend to shut down in public and melt down in private. Hmm....


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Joe90
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16 Feb 2015, 1:15 pm

Where I come from I've heard a lot of people use ''meltdown'' as a term for ''a crying/tearful/emotional episode''.


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sinsboldly
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16 Feb 2015, 1:51 pm

-Vorzac- wrote:
Personally, I felt the term originated from radioactive meltdowns at nuclear power stations.

Having lived 22 years before there were radioactive meltdowns at nuclear power stations I believe the usual term was 'tantrum' (a violent demonstration of rage or frustration; a sudden burst of ill temper) or 'fit' a : a sudden violent attack of a disease (as epilepsy) especially when marked by convulsions or unconsciousness : paroxysm
b : a sudden but transient attack of a physical disturbance) or even 'convulsions' ( a synonym for seizure, but not all seizures are characterized by convulsions. A person having convulsions appears to be shaking rapidly and without control.)

In 1972 people were starting to say "Freak Out" but that was a colorful reference to the psychadelia of the day, and those not wanting to express themselves to identify with that adopted the less culture choice weighted "melt down."

Or at least that is how I remembered it.

Merle


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