Aspergers subtypes -- The Emotional Aspergers Child

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zette
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24 Jun 2012, 3:38 pm

I thought this article on AS subtypes was very interesting. My son is definitely "predominately ADHD" subtype, and is one of those who doesn't seem to be interested in identifying and following rules.

The Emotional Aspergers Child

Here's the beginning of the article:

Quote:
Many children with Aspergers and High-Functioning Autism fall into one of the “emotional types” listed below. Their feelings control their actions. These kids have many more tantrums, are less available, easily disengage, and are more prone to defiant behavior.

This is the most difficult type of Aspergers child to deal with, because rules – and the reasons for rules – mean much less to him. The parents and teachers who have to deal with the emotional Aspie often find themselves in a state of frustration or crisis. Many of these children will end up on medications for their issues, because their coping skills are poorly developed and inadequate to meet the demands of home and school. But that’s o.k., because the right medication and an effective behavioral plan can do wonders.



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24 Jun 2012, 3:56 pm

This subtype describes me very accurately:

Quote:
Type 4: The Predominately Daydreaming Aspie—

This youngster is very similar to the OCD type, except his distractions primarily involve his preoccupations with fantasy (e.g., fantasy books, Japanese animé, Pokémon, show tunes, cartoons, TV shows, video games. etc.). If, for example, the fantasy involves books or music, he doesn't need the actual object to experience its pleasure. So he replays, re-creates, or in some way engages in the obsession in his head. As he is eating dinner, sitting in class, doing his homework, or talking to his parents, there is another video playing in his head – a video that is all about fantasy. He may perform word-for-word scripting of dialogue and scenes in his head, or combine different ones together, or make up his own based on something he has seen or read. These fantasies serve many functions (e.g., they are enjoyable, they remove him from the unpleasantness of the real world, demands are reduced, everything goes just the way he wants, etc.). Consequently, reality is avoided, interactions with others occur less frequently, and life goes on without him. This is how he copes with stress and reality. Interfere with his preoccupations, and you will experience his wrath. Leave him to his preoccupations, and he can entertain himself for hours.



Sweetleaf
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24 Jun 2012, 4:12 pm

zette wrote:
I thought this article on AS subtypes was very interesting. My son is definitely "predominately ADHD" subtype, and is one of those who doesn't seem to be interested in identifying and following rules.

The Emotional Aspergers Child

Here's the beginning of the article:

Quote:
Many children with Aspergers and High-Functioning Autism fall into one of the “emotional types” listed below. Their feelings control their actions. These kids have many more tantrums, are less available, easily disengage, and are more prone to defiant behavior.

This is the most difficult type of Aspergers child to deal with, because rules – and the reasons for rules – mean much less to him. The parents and teachers who have to deal with the emotional Aspie often find themselves in a state of frustration or crisis. Many of these children will end up on medications for their issues, because their coping skills are poorly developed and inadequate to meet the demands of home and school. But that’s o.k., because the right medication and an effective behavioral plan can do wonders.


They wording seems a little bit judgmental, I guess I'll have to take a look at the whole article to figure out what exactly the point is. 'that's ok because the right medication and behavior plan can do wonders.' is one part I really dislike. For one there is not medication for Autism, there is medication to help with some co-morbids or to sedate the kid so they don't react to things. One has to be careful about medication especially giving it to kids. Also Autism is not a behavioral problem it is a mental disorder, so I question the validity of some of the behavioral plans, especially the ones focused on forcing neurotypical behavior and treating Autistic behavior as wrong or 'bad'. If it's focused on coping and such though for the benefit of the child then I see no issue though.


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Sweetleaf
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24 Jun 2012, 4:20 pm

Yeah don't think I am a big fan of this article, especially the last part about pessimistic type. I think it's terrible to teach kids 'it's better to be silent than be pessimistic and that they should only express positive feelings.' I kind of got taught that and as a result ended up suppressing things till something small would set me off or I internalized a lot of negativity......not healthy.

Why should one be expected to act happy if they aren't...Also since I sort of fit that type of course I don't really cry about things, I think its more not wanting to do activities that are legitimately pleasant for them or they may not understand what to do and come off as stubborn. not simply non-preferred tasks. Also I think it is pretty mean to say this type is more of a 'nuisance' than anything.....do you know what it does to someone being treated like simple nuisance? not much for self esteem. I don't know I suppose I am being rather pessimistic.


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Bombaloo
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24 Jun 2012, 10:47 pm

zette - thanks for posting these blogs, good analysis I would say. I see my son in the fearful, the stressed and the defiant Aspie. Mostly the stressed Aspie. It does make me a bit disappointed that medication is addressed as being almost inevitable for kids in these categories but looking beyond those statements there are some good points here.



ASDMommyASDKid
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25 Jun 2012, 3:46 am

My son is a bit of all of it, I think. I think they took different Aspie aspects and turned them into subtypes. Some kids may have more of some, than others but that is true of every criteria in the DSM. Some of the hints are helpful.

I think the subtypes, when they figure out the neurology, will look much different than this. Some kids are hyperlexic, some aren't. Some have musical aptitudes, math aptitudes etc. This article focused only behaviorally related things.



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25 Jun 2012, 4:50 am

I am pretty sure that DS falls into

Type 4: The Predominately Daydreaming Aspie

This youngster is very similar to the OCD type, except his distractions primarily involve his preoccupations with fantasy (e.g., fantasy books, Japanese animé, Pokémon, show tunes, cartoons, TV shows, video games. etc.). If, for example, the fantasy involves books or music, he doesn't need the actual object to experience its pleasure. So he replays, re-creates, or in some way engages in the obsession in his head. As he is eating dinner, sitting in class, doing his homework, or talking to his parents, there is another video playing in his head – a video that is all about fantasy. He may perform word-for-word scripting of dialogue and scenes in his head, or combine different ones together, or make up his own based on something he has seen or read. These fantasies serve many functions (e.g., they are enjoyable, they remove him from the unpleasantness of the real world, demands are reduced, everything goes just the way he wants, etc.). Consequently, reality is avoided, interactions with others occur less frequently, and life goes on without him. This is how he copes with stress and reality. Interfere with his preoccupations, and you will experience his wrath. Leave him to his preoccupations, and he can entertain himself for hours.

Suggested Parenting Techniques:

Everything that was suggested about the OCD type applies here. In addition, parents must go beyond those techniques to include teaching the child the difference between reality and fantasy, how to recognize it, what constitutes each, and how to be in the here and now. Parents should limit fantasy time and help the child to develop the ability to enjoy non-fantasy activities. If he can't enjoy the real world, he won't want to be a part of it. Medication is needed in some cases.


I hate the idea that medication could be needed


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ASDMommyASDKid
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25 Jun 2012, 6:33 am

I totally did not get this, either:

Quote:
Suggested Parenting Techniques:

Everything that was suggested about the OCD type applies here. In addition, parents must go beyond those techniques to include teaching the child the difference between reality and fantasy, how to recognize it, what constitutes each, and how to be in the here and now. Parents should limit fantasy time and help the child to develop the ability to enjoy non-fantasy activities. If he can't enjoy the real world, he won't want to be a part of it. Medication is needed in some cases.


I thought we were supposed to encourage imaginative play. I do not think the issue is so much not being able to tell fantasy from reality, so much as them preferring the mental diversion.

Also, I do not know how this for those of us who have kids or started doing this late. They are supposed to do this a lot at 3 or 4. My son is 7, but didn't really start this often until closer to 5.

My son has been doing a lot of imaginative play as of late and I think it is good for theory of mind, and it helps me introduce social concepts. I am not sure why they recommend to curtail it, unless it is the same as when they say to curtail the special interests, and they want kids to be able to be OK without the mental stimulation it gives, so they can do what others' want them to do, more.



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25 Jun 2012, 8:13 am

My daughter would most likely fall into this category. There are some rules we can rationalize, but she only seems to care if the rational is that SHE will come to harm in some way. If it is someone else... she doesn't care which is why she still hits and pushes her classmates. Doesn't understand why she is punished after, neither the rule about no hitting nor the punishment for it seem to make sense to her. She knows she isn't supposed to hit but doesn't really understand why. A lot of it is lack of empathy. She really doesn't care if she hurts her friends.

My husband and I discussed this again last night. He doesn't like labels but does see that we need to do something because we are clearly not doing something right with our daughter. So he is now on board for doing whatever we need to do to get treatment for her to help her. HE will never accept a label for her, period, but if the treatment works he will go for it. He doesn't believe in AS and NT. He believes in severe autism, moderate autism and then everyone else is on a spectrum of humanity.

Our absolute nightmare would be medicating her. That is absolutely not something we want to do. We both agreed that it would be our absolute last resort and only if she absolutely cannot cope with any sort of schooling (home schooling included, we would go that route if we have to even if we have to sell the house and move into a 2br apartment). We both believe that the medication ONLY treats the symptoms while killing the person. If someone has AS or similar, it IS who they ARE and that includes the desirable and undesirable traits. If you have a pill that "treats" the undesirable traits, chances are it also "treats" the desirable ones.



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25 Jun 2012, 12:48 pm

According to this I think my sons would be predominately the "OCD type" and I would be the "daydreaming". It is interesting, but doesn't seem all that helpful to me? Some of the parenting advice given seems sound, but some I would take with a large "grain of salt".



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26 Jun 2012, 9:48 am

Here is a website that explains it in a bit of a different way although the suggestions are still a bit off in my opinion.

http://life.familyeducation.com/asperge ... 40204.html

I also think it is not very scientific. The positive that I see in this type of article is the idea that all people with AS are not alike and may have very different needs. It may help some parents to see the world from their child's perspective.

As some of the other poster's have said, my son is not really in any one of these categories, but rather in parts of several (anxiety/stressed, ADHD primarily and some negativity/fearful at times)



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26 Jun 2012, 5:54 pm

Eureka-C wrote:
Here is a website that explains it in a bit of a different way although the suggestions are still a bit off in my opinion.

http://life.familyeducation.com/asperge ... 40204.html

I also think it is not very scientific. The positive that I see in this type of article is the idea that all people with AS are not alike and may have very different needs. It may help some parents to see the world from their child's perspective.

I think these descriptions could be helpful for more than just parents. Teachers, caregivers and others who are involved in the child's life could benefit from having this level of understanding. I just forwarded that link to the teacher my son will have for his classroom teacher next year and his sp ed teacher. The sp ed teacher worked with him last year and she picked up on his anxiety issues pretty quickly however, his classroom teacher for next year needs to start developing an understanding of his skills and deficits.



zette
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06 Jul 2012, 7:44 pm

I have to say, it's really frustrating that the only advice they give for the predominantly ADHD subtype is "get meds." Yes, we're doing that, and it helps tremendously, but it's not a cure-all. I could still use some tips on how to manage his outbursts!



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07 Jul 2012, 7:28 am

As much as I like the article I hate how they worded the article, made it all about the negatives for the most parts. For instance, a pessimistic aspergian might view world issues and try to bring them to attention where others won't. Extremes are bad though.

I discovered through that article though that I am "the predominantly daydreaming" type with a little bit of defiant personality. And it is true, I can entertain myself for hours!

My daydreams are always music, robot wars, art or video game related lately.


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07 Jul 2012, 7:58 am

I think the descriptions are primarily helpful as a parent to get me thinking about the fact that Aspies are different and that my son has his own unique way of being Aspie . . . and there are different ways I can help him by understanding who he is.

That said, I think he is definitely the Emotional Aspie--primarily OCD with a little fearful/defiant thrown in. He is able to completely focus on what HE wants to focus on . . . but not what we ask him to focus on! If he is counting to 100, he may not be interrupted and the world will come to and end if he is. Doesn't matter if we have to leave for school in two minutes, he is counting to 100!! (better be fast) :lol: