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CharlesRooster
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12 Oct 2017, 1:56 pm

I'm just wondering if having to squint in bright sunlight is an aspie/asd thing or if it's perfectly normal to have to do so, because I pretty much will only have one eye open and squinted in bright sunlight :?:


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Exuvian
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12 Oct 2017, 7:42 pm

I do the pirate eye thing too on bright days, but I don't know if ASD has anything to do with it. It could just as well be because I have light colored eyes (darker eyes are better protected from light).

A pair of polarized sunglasses makes life outside considerably more comfortable. 8)



BirdInFlight
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12 Oct 2017, 8:32 pm

Everyone squints in bright sunlight, you don't have to have light sensitivity for that, it's normal even for NT eyes to squint in the sun.

What's more indicative of light sensitivity is if you are also squinting or nearly feeling a need to do so when it's not even bright sunlight.



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12 Oct 2017, 8:54 pm

Lots of people buy glasses that automatically darken in bright light.



EzraS
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12 Oct 2017, 9:05 pm

It's common for people with autism to be extra sensitive to light, sound, smell, taste and touch.

While most everyone squints in bright light, someome with autism might have a more exaggerated squint where the whole face scrunches up and hands are used as shades.

Rather than that cool looking Clint Eastwood type squint.


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12 Oct 2017, 11:29 pm

It could go either way. I wear glasses and I have Transitions XTRActive lenses. I have polarized prescription sunglasses for even brighter days or environments.


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xatrix26
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13 Oct 2017, 2:11 am

I have an overall light sensitivity issue with sunlight and as a result dark and gloomy days make me happy. Even for an aspie I'm sure that's weird.

But my real problem are headlights in my rear view mirror in my car. That usually causes a great deal of aggression.


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13 Oct 2017, 2:39 am

I think that is pretty normal because sunlight can actually damage eyes, so I think most people find it unpleasant to have the sun in their eyes. However I have always been sensitive to indoor light that doesn't seem to bother most people so I think it would be more likely aspies with sensory issues may find inside light others tolerate to be unbearable....but I think anyone walking with the sun in their eyes may squint or try and shield their eyes.


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Britte
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13 Oct 2017, 4:44 am

xatrix26 wrote:
...But my real problem are headlights in my rear view mirror in my car. That usually causes a great deal of aggression.

I have sensitivity to headlights, as well. Particularly, with some of the newer cars with LED/blue light headlights. I try not to drive at night, for this reason. I don't experience 'aggression', but, I become rather agitated/ anxious with extreme photo-sensitivity.



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13 Oct 2017, 7:59 am

When I was a driver I too had problems with headlights in my rear view mirror; very distracting and aggravating.

As for daylight, I do have light sensitivity even on a cloudy day. Even those blank "white" skies (cloud cover) seem glaring to my eyes. A sunny day of course goes without saying, but then even NTs don't like sun right in their eyes and will squint, shield their eyes and of course wear sunglasses.

I used to wear sunglasses in the sunny place I use to live, where the sun was always very, very bright and harsh.

I now live in a less sunny place and instead of sunglasses I am now a huge fan of hats that have a deep bill or peak to give my eyes shade. Outside I am ALWAYS in a hat with a bill, even on cloudy days, as I still perceive that as glaring and it makes me squint without my hat on.



Britte
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13 Oct 2017, 1:25 pm

Hi BirdInFlight. My experiences with light are quite similar to yours, and, like you, I wear a hat, outdoors (indoors, as well). Not to get too off topic, but, last night, the last of several lights/fixtures were replaced with LED lights, at an office I work in. The effects on one's health that LED/blue light can cause, doesn't stop at those with light/photo-sensitivity. In doing some research last night, I found a few articles pertaining to Blue-light blocking glasses. I will be ordering a couple pair, today. I have been utilizing a blue-light blocking app, called f.lux, on my computer, for the past couple of years, recommended by the WP member, Noca in fact, and I cannot imagine life without it. I have an iPhone, which came equipped with a setting, appropriately named; Night Shift of which, blocks blue light. The glasses work the same way (thought I'd mention, in case it could be of benefit to others, as well).



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13 Oct 2017, 2:05 pm

I also keep my computer, iPad and iPhone dimmed.


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EclecticWarrior
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13 Oct 2017, 6:51 pm

I personally am not overly sensitive to light but went to school with a kid (AS) whose light sensitivity was so bad he had to wear tinted glasses all the time.


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15 Oct 2017, 3:25 pm

If I've been inside and I go out and it's bright I will usually get a migraine and go extremely tired because I find it just too bright.



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16 Oct 2017, 11:24 am

Same here.. Due to light oversensitivity I wear polarized glasses, even indoors. Every once in a while I have to shut myself in a dark room and put a pillow on my face to block every ray of light coming in.
If I somehow forget to shut the curtains, I will feel dizzy and suffer from oversensivity during my dreams: won't be able to look up, partial blindness etc.
It's a very disabling condition unfortunately..