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perpetuumobile
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11 Jun 2016, 10:25 am

Hey! So I'm still new, and not yet medically diagnosed, but I've been thinking about Aspergers and my highschool times lately. I was wondering if this maybe has to do with Autism, and/or if some of you are experiencing the same: I was always excellent at maths, at logical and abstract thinking (analysis, formulas, systems...) BUT I had massive problems learning multiplication tables, in primary school I was only able to do basic calculus only after A LOT of practice.

Everyone thought I was just rebellious, because in highschool I became VERY good at maths, I was in a maths, informatics and physics orientated class (8 hours of maths, 5 of physics and chemistry each, 4 hours of informatics per week). I was very good at maths but still could not calculate properly (good with letters x,y,a,b,etc. though). Today I still struggle with basic calculus, dates, numbers in general, price of clothing/objects, and telling the time (analog clock). So, dyscalculia but excellent at logic and abstract formulas anyone?



BaalChatzaf
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12 Jun 2016, 6:12 pm

perpetuumobile wrote:
Hey! So I'm still new, and not yet medically diagnosed, but I've been thinking about Aspergers and my highschool times lately. I was wondering if this maybe has to do with Autism, and/or if some of you are experiencing the same: I was always excellent at maths, at logical and abstract thinking (analysis, formulas, systems...) BUT I had massive problems learning multiplication tables, in primary school I was only able to do basic calculus only after A LOT of practice.

Everyone thought I was just rebellious, because in highschool I became VERY good at maths, I was in a maths, informatics and physics orientated class (8 hours of maths, 5 of physics and chemistry each, 4 hours of informatics per week). I was very good at maths but still could not calculate properly (good with letters x,y,a,b,etc. though). Today I still struggle with basic calculus, dates, numbers in general, price of clothing/objects, and telling the time (analog clock). So, dyscalculia but excellent at logic and abstract formulas anyone?


There is not much correlation between being good at proving theorems or problem solving and being good with arithmetic. If you need to calculate use a calculator. It is built to do the job quickly and reliably.


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slave
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12 Jun 2016, 11:44 pm

perpetuumobile wrote:
Hey! So I'm still new, and not yet medically diagnosed, but I've been thinking about Aspergers and my highschool times lately. I was wondering if this maybe has to do with Autism, and/or if some of you are experiencing the same: I was always excellent at maths, at logical and abstract thinking (analysis, formulas, systems...) BUT I had massive problems learning multiplication tables, in primary school I was only able to do basic calculus only after A LOT of practice.

Everyone thought I was just rebellious, because in highschool I became VERY good at maths, I was in a maths, informatics and physics orientated class (8 hours of maths, 5 of physics and chemistry each, 4 hours of informatics per week). I was very good at maths but still could not calculate properly (good with letters x,y,a,b,etc. though). Today I still struggle with basic calculus, dates, numbers in general, price of clothing/objects, and telling the time (analog clock). So, dyscalculia but excellent at logic and abstract formulas anyone?


I've encountered dozens on this site and heard of Mathematicians who struggle with arithmetic operations but which excel at actual Mathematics.

There are MANY like you. :D


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Since the birth of civilization, small sets of dominant individuals have controlled the numerical majority. Even a cursory reading of world history will substantiate this claim. Kings, Pharaohs, Emperors, Sultans, Czars, and Dictators have imposed their will upon their subjects. This pattern has not changed over the millennia and it remains so, today. Our Masters rule over every nation and no one can defy them. They will attain Absolute Power as we reach the Singularity. All those who oppose their will, will be destroyed. Given the obvious futility, I will not resist. 2+2=5.


FizzyOrange
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12 Jun 2016, 11:54 pm

I used to be very good at maths and loved physics more than anything in the world. In high school, that was the most happiest I'd ever been. I learned formulas with ease. I struggled with most everything else. I suck at dates and names.



slave
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13 Jun 2016, 6:11 pm

perpetuumobile wrote:
Hey! So I'm still new, and not yet medically diagnosed, but I've been thinking about Aspergers and my highschool times lately. I was wondering if this maybe has to do with Autism, and/or if some of you are experiencing the same: I was always excellent at maths, at logical and abstract thinking (analysis, formulas, systems...) BUT I had massive problems learning multiplication tables, in primary school I was only able to do basic calculus only after A LOT of practice.

Everyone thought I was just rebellious, because in highschool I became VERY good at maths, I was in a maths, informatics and physics orientated class (8 hours of maths, 5 of physics and chemistry each, 4 hours of informatics per week). I was very good at maths but still could not calculate properly (good with letters x,y,a,b,etc. though). Today I still struggle with basic calculus, dates, numbers in general, price of clothing/objects, and telling the time (analog clock). So, dyscalculia but excellent at logic and abstract formulas anyone?


Does part of you want to leave Linguistics and pursue Maths instead?


_________________
Since the birth of civilization, small sets of dominant individuals have controlled the numerical majority. Even a cursory reading of world history will substantiate this claim. Kings, Pharaohs, Emperors, Sultans, Czars, and Dictators have imposed their will upon their subjects. This pattern has not changed over the millennia and it remains so, today. Our Masters rule over every nation and no one can defy them. They will attain Absolute Power as we reach the Singularity. All those who oppose their will, will be destroyed. Given the obvious futility, I will not resist. 2+2=5.


BaalChatzaf
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15 Jun 2016, 8:20 pm

FizzyOrange wrote:
I used to be very good at maths and loved physics more than anything in the world. In high school, that was the most happiest I'd ever been. I learned formulas with ease. I struggled with most everything else. I suck at dates and names.


Physics is not so much about formulas as it is about knowing how things interact.


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ABZB
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19 Jun 2016, 2:47 pm

I know of the existence of at least some highly successful theoretical mathematicians who were quite bad at arithemetic.

For example, there's an apocryphal story about... Kronecker, IIRC, that in the course of some lecture, he had to calculate 6X7, and he concluded it was 42 by eliminating every other possibility by other means (40 has a factor of 5, because it ends in a 0; 41, 43, & 47 are prime, 49 is a square, 48 has 4 as a factor (all digits are powers of 2, least digit is 4). or something like that).

Especially in the highly abstract fields, you generally aren't doing arithmetic at all.

It can be helpful sometimes, and is a nice party trick (I'm reasonably good at mental operations), but it's hardly necessary.



SippingSpiderVenom
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06 Jul 2016, 1:05 pm

I doubt there's an elementary teacher in the world that would accept that answer. I remember getting in trouble for creating a product of primes, i.e. 2*3*7 and rearranging as needed. Anything but transcription and rote memorization was quickly and soundly punished.


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Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 142 of 200
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slave
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08 Jul 2016, 12:08 am

SippingSpiderVenom wrote:
I doubt there's an elementary teacher in the world that would accept that answer. I remember getting in trouble for creating a product of primes, i.e. 2*3*7 and rearranging as needed. Anything but transcription and rote memorization was quickly and soundly punished.


.....and thus the public school fucktards miss the ENTIRE point of early Maths education....ie. to learn how to think

reasoning not regurgitating

they try very hard to ruin Maths......and for many they succeed........ :roll:


_________________
Since the birth of civilization, small sets of dominant individuals have controlled the numerical majority. Even a cursory reading of world history will substantiate this claim. Kings, Pharaohs, Emperors, Sultans, Czars, and Dictators have imposed their will upon their subjects. This pattern has not changed over the millennia and it remains so, today. Our Masters rule over every nation and no one can defy them. They will attain Absolute Power as we reach the Singularity. All those who oppose their will, will be destroyed. Given the obvious futility, I will not resist. 2+2=5.