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worsedale
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11 Jan 2006, 11:56 am

Its often said that aspies have a greater aptitude in the sciences and maths. Is this true for you or do you tend to creative subjects?

I am not making generalisations here, even in the most analytical of sciences it can be important to have an imagination to predict models to explain and clarify what's happening.
For that matter, as a scientist are you strong in maths and science or one or the other? People often say physics and maths go hand in hand but I've always disputed it. There are mathematicians who can do almost anything with the tools of maths, ie algebra, but they find it much harder to use these tools to solve problems in the real, physical world, so to speak.



TheGreyBadger
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11 Jan 2006, 2:44 pm

Creative. Definietly creative.



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11 Jan 2006, 3:03 pm

erm... both? (typical me, i'm afraid... :roll: )



Namiko
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11 Jan 2006, 8:47 pm

I would probably have to say both, as well. I prefer to be analytical, but not completely cut and dry (ie, math). I rather like chemistry because it's a good combination of theory, concepts and math involved. You really have to know the stuff, but it's not pure memorization. :)


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11 Jan 2006, 10:20 pm

I would say that I am definitely more analytical. I would thrive at any job involving analysis. I am not a very creative person.



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11 Jan 2006, 10:27 pm

Definitely the analytical type. I'll have bursts of strong vibrant scenes/visions, but don't have the impetus to write them out on paper.


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SolaCatella
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12 Jan 2006, 7:19 am

Depends. I'm very good at my lit classes, but I can't write fiction worth anything. (Poetry and essays, yes, but I don't seem to have the necessary creative spark for fiction.) I'm good at biology, especially zoology and what genetics I've been allowed to cover, and I'm very good at analyzing history. However, I've never really enjoyed math, chemistry and other high-logic subjects, although I'm not bad at them.

I'd have to call myself analytical, although I prefer subjects that deal with more thinking and less memorization than math and chemistry. I just don't have the creative spark to give me what I consider an aptitude for creativity.



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12 Jan 2006, 10:41 am

A fair mix of both. I love the sciences and even though Psychology is now considered a "soft science" I'm drawn to the harder side of it: Biopsychology. And I enjoy Biology in general and enjoyed the bit of chemistry I took in high school (I would have taken more had I not hated the teacher and she, me).

But I also love doing art and poetry (the poetry's susided a bit now though).

So, I'm probably about 55% logical and 45% creative I'd say. Almost even.


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McManager
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12 Jan 2006, 2:52 pm

Namiko wrote:
I would probably have to say both, as well. I prefer to be analytical, but not completely cut and dry (ie, math). I rather like chemistry because it's a good combination of theory, concepts and math involved. You really have to know the stuff, but it's not pure memorization. :)


Boy do I ever agree with that! I ended up liking Physics a lot more though. (Even less memorization. I can remember numbers, but not the names of things)

I find because I'm analytical and I'm able to mimic creativity. See I'm not sure if I'm all that creative, but I am very good at copying the creativity of others.

E.g. I've created CS maps based on real locations. I create electronica tracks that mimic the style of various artists. I used to write stories that were actually similar to things I had read in the past.

On their own it would seem like any of these things would be creative, but in reality their just inspired pieces.



medianmistermustard
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12 Jan 2006, 6:03 pm

Yeah, I've always liked analytical oriented classes, but not 100% of the time, like I took this one jazz musicology course that I did very well in because I found the subject interesting and on the other hand I took a stat course and got a C because I was just bored to tears and didn't do the hw. On the whole though, I've had better experiences in math and science.



worsedale
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12 Jan 2006, 6:48 pm

Quote:
on the other hand I took a stat course and got a C because I was just bored to tears and didn't do the hw.


I wouldn't be concerned if I flunked sats, because I think stats is 100% bullshit. Very little of it isn't made up to help market men and politicians.

Quote:
fair mix of both. I love the sciences and even though Psychology is now considered a "soft science" I'm drawn to the harder side of it: Biopsychology.


Biopsychology? Please elaborate. I think psychology is a very soft discipline but I'd be very interested to look at the mind from a 'purely' scientific point of view.



QuirkyCarla
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13 Jan 2006, 1:51 am

Definitely more creative. My favorite subjects in high school were English and Music. I love singing and writing...I just hate writing papers because than I'm usually not enjoying what I'm writing.



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13 Jan 2006, 9:28 am

Both. I'm good at science and lit.. and although I hate maths I'm alright at it. I second what SolaCatella said. Except I can write stories if I have an idea. So I'm probably half/half. I couldn't seperate biology and literature, and they're from both ends so.. Although I could definately seperate maths from science :P



worsedale
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13 Jan 2006, 10:46 am

Now Biology is the one science I have never enjoyed. I can't be bothered with genetics or nature, unless maybe you throw in some chemistry to make biochemistry.
Anyone here into biophysics?



Sophist
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13 Jan 2006, 11:34 am

worsedale wrote:
Sophist wrote:
fair mix of both. I love the sciences and even though Psychology is now considered a "soft science" I'm drawn to the harder side of it: Biopsychology.


Biopsychology? Please elaborate. I think psychology is a very soft discipline but I'd be very interested to look at the mind from a 'purely' scientific point of view.


"Biopsychology" is the general name given to various fields of research on the biology of the Central Nervous System (brain and spinal cord) which include:

1. Physiological Psychology- studies the neural mechanisms of behavior by manipulating the nervous systems of nonhuman animals in controlled experiments. (In short, this is the name given to "Animal Research"-- a field which I wish to stay very far away from.)

2. Psychopharmacology- studies the effects of drugs on the brain and behavior.

3. Neuropsychology- studies the psychological effects of brain damage in human patients.

4. Psychophysiology- studies the relation between physiological activity and psychological processes in humans using noninvasive methods (i.e., EEG).

5. Cognitive Neuroscience- studies the neural mechanisms of human cognitions, largely through using functional brain imaging techniques (i.e., PET scan, fMRI). Includes subfields such as: Neuroanatomy, Neurochemistry, Neuroendocrinology, Neuropathology, Neuropharmacology, and Neurophysiology.

6. Comparative Psychology- studies the evolution, genetics, and adaptiveness of behavior, largely through using the comparative method.

I'd have to save my favorite areas of interest within the vast field of Biopsychology would be Neuropsychology, Cognitive Neuroscience (especially Neuroanatomy, Neurochemistry, Neuroendocrinology, and Neuropathology), and Comparative Psychology.

Hope those definitions help to clear some questions up, woresdale. And maybe it will inspire an interest in Psychology for you. :)


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