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Twilightprincess
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04 Dec 2019, 1:24 pm

In your experience, how helpful is that mode of thinking before starting a career that one is qualified for on paper but in which there’s some uncertainty as to whether it will work from an emotional (or even logistical) standpoint - the sort of thing that one can only know through giving it a try?

It’s helpful in job interviews because it helps the applicant land the job, but how does it work as far as on-the-job training and the initial new-job-nerves go?



shortfatbalduglyman
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04 Dec 2019, 6:10 pm

Honest

Authentic

Genuine

Acting skills

A previous coworker told me to carry a clipboard and walk quickly

Other candidates are faking it too

"If you can't beat them, join them. Or live outside it all. Creatures that live outside it all don't last long"



DoniiMann
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06 Dec 2019, 3:37 pm

I've had jobs where it hasn't worked because I was unsuited to the job and didn't last long enough to 'make it'.

But I've had jobs where it did work. For example, my last job which I did for over three years until the business closed. I started that job in an easy section, then moved to a different station in the complex that I took over piece by piece as I mastered each station on the floor.

I think it comes down to how quickly we find out our strengths and weaknesses so as to make realistic job choices.

In my early days, decades before my diagnosis, I completed three hospitality certificates (including silver service). I was impressed by the uniforms and their poise.

No way was I suited to being a waiter.

The closer you are to matching yourself to a job you have an aptitude for, the more likely you are to succeeding at fake it til.

Seriously, the only issue is that it takes us longer to settle in than bosses are willing to wait. So long as you can reasonably expect to get there, all you're doing is camouflaging a calendar.


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blackomen
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06 Dec 2019, 3:44 pm

Almost never works for me because I often fall apart from trying to fake it long befire I make it.



megan2019
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09 Dec 2019, 3:34 pm

What for, dude?



shortfatbalduglyman
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09 Dec 2019, 5:17 pm

In some jobs, "fake it till you make it" will get you so far

In some jobs "fake it till you make it" will get you nowhere".



blackomen
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10 Dec 2019, 9:43 am

shortfatbalduglyman wrote:
In some jobs, "fake it till you make it" will get you so far

In some jobs "fake it till you make it" will get you nowhere".


Fake it till you make it only works when you're the new guy that everyone is underestimating, at least from my experience.



Oculus
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10 Dec 2019, 12:53 pm

It has worked well for me, in conjunction with the mantra: "Every job is training for your next job."

When I switched career tracks, my first job in the new track was very much a "fake it 'til you make it" situation. On one hand I didn't do very well, and it only lasted about a year, but on the other hand I was able to learn enough from it that I was very successful in my next job after that.

Every employer is an opportunity to learn about new things -- how your coworkers do their jobs, why the company does what they do, the technologies used by the company, the external services the company depends on, etc.

The more you learn, the greater your potential for workplace success. It's not the only factor, but it's important. It's all good to put on a resume, too; prospective employers love to see a diversity of skills.



synack
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14 Dec 2019, 2:53 pm

From my personal experienced, it worked quite well. Of course there were "glitches" and sometimes I had to find another work place, but all in all it worked (construction painting, waiter, and now in IT). I even pushed this mode of thinking to the most uncomfortable place for me: public speeches. This was far from perfect or even good, but I survived through it and learnt a ton of things on the way.

I'd say the only thing you can lose is the job, which, let's be honest, does not matter much in our modern society where one frequently changes jobs anyway for better salary or whatnot.



Brehus
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07 Jan 2020, 4:33 pm

Fake it till you make it has worked for me many times in my career it has been the only way I have been able to move up in my career. Recruiters are looking to submit the best possible client with the best matching skill set (Don't blame them as they are trying to get paid just like everyone else) I find if you don't fake it till you make it you will likely get pigeonholed into a certain type of job based on your work experience with that being said if you don't know how to talk the jargon and do a lot of research on the job you are trying for they will see right through it in the interview

With that being said not every has what it takes to fake it till you make it and might crash and burn.

I also take nootropics so my mind super clear and focused which makes it a lot easier pick things up a lot quicker


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kraftiekortie
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08 Jan 2020, 9:48 am

All people have to "fake it" in public---no matter what neurology they are.

That's just the way it is.

In cave man days, I am sure there were guys who just didn't want to hunt----but wanted to just hang out around the cave and make tools or something. Do you believe that guy would have expressed that desire to the rest of his buddies in the band?



AprilR
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09 Jan 2020, 11:31 am

I used to think it works until my employer basically told me today that my legal drafts suck and she wasn't sure if i improved in any way.



IsabellaLinton
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09 Jan 2020, 12:44 pm

It's not smart or easy to fake the actual skills required in a job. People who are a liability to the company will be identified and weeded out through performance reviews and probationary contracts. Faking confidence or enjoyment of the job is easier, but will usually catch up with people and cause premature burnout.



AprilR
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09 Jan 2020, 11:08 pm

^ this. I wish people around me coukd comprehend that and stop acting like i can do anything i want if i just try. Because i have tried many many times and i am still trying but it's not enough.



Twilightprincess
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14 Jan 2020, 1:02 pm

Faking it til I make it as far as confidence goes is working for me so far. Yay!

I’m a preferred and requested substitute teacher in a couple of classrooms already.