Job for an Aspie with a business school degree?

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Mindblender
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30 Oct 2014, 4:45 am

Hello,

I have a business school degree, and I have no idea what kind of job I could do... Not in sales, not in communication or marketing, not in management... It looks like I am in front of closed doors... Do you know companies in Europe that are aspie-friendly or that purposely choose aspies for business-related activities? I speak fluently English, Portuguese and French, plus good level of Spanish. I am creative. I am unfortunately affected by high IQ, which leads to mental confusion. I just can't withstand the load of interacting with people one whole day - let alone one week...I can't find a job in which I see myself fit. Any advice is greatly appreciated.
Thanks.



ok
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30 Oct 2014, 8:47 am

It all depends on what it is you're good at and what you like to work with. If you don't want to try sales, marketing and communication, I suppose you could try accounting or some sort of IT related work? Like a "passive communication" job where you answer questions by email or telephone - like customer support or IT support. If you speak several languages, you should have a fair chance.



MissDorkness
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30 Oct 2014, 8:59 am

Maybe you can find a post working from home translating business documents.

I used to write part time, and most of that is drumming up gigs, and I always saw jobs for translators, and I know an organization I used to work with liked to have their magazines translated for other regions (and not just automatic, something done by someone intelligent who can change phrasing if need be while still keeping the original meaning). If you got in with the right service or company, it could mean steady work you could do without in-person interaction.



Mindblender
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30 Oct 2014, 9:04 am

Thank you, guys, for your suggestions.



kraftiekortie
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30 Oct 2014, 9:25 am

Daria the Headhunter :wink



lightningorb
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31 Oct 2014, 2:43 pm

Why did you major in business if you can't talk to people? Take 2-3 programming classes and work as a programmer, since u already have a degree you should get a job. NOW GO DO IT!!



Mindblender
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31 Oct 2014, 3:40 pm

Please, be kind...It is not that easy...



lightningorb
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31 Oct 2014, 4:32 pm

I was being kind lol, and it's true.. you do have a degree.. Why can't you work in management? Do you have social phobia? You might not have to talk to people a lot. Maybe just hold a meeting or 2.. Otherwise take whatever classes you can transfer to another degree/program. And get a degree in science or something. I still dont get why u studied business.. maybe you can change if you work with urself? and get rid of ur social phobia



Rocket123
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31 Oct 2014, 4:54 pm

I have a business school degree (along with an undergraduate degree in information systems). If you have a technical background, I would suggest systems analysis. It?s perfect for those who are super detail-oriented.



aspinnaker
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31 Oct 2014, 7:42 pm

Have a look at Data Analyst positions. It's profession on the intersection of business, IT, and analytics that has grown tremendously in the past few years due to the rapidly fallling cost to use data.

Data analyst positions vary in the type of degree they require, but a large number are fine with a business degree as long as you have the quantitative foundation and ability. A business background is definitely beneficial as the ultimate goal of undertaking the data analysis is to leverage it to drive better business decisions or to create value-adding products or tools.

I'm not aware of how much interaction you can handle, but data analysis generally requires plenty of independent work as you are cleaning data, coding, and undertaking analysis. You will need to interact with other workers however, especially in terms of communicating your findings. How tolerant they are of a lack of social interaction will be firm-specific, so you will need to interview and see what you are comfortable with. It is likely that firms will be more lenient in this regard if you are working in the more technical or machine learning heavy roles: however, you will generally need a masters or phd to apply to these roles.

If you want a non-degree way of supplementing your business degree, you can watch Andrew Ng's machine learning videos on coursera or participating in Kaggle competitions. However, these are not a necessity for the more business (less technical) data focused roles.



Mindblender
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01 Nov 2014, 12:28 pm

I'll look into these two suggestions i.e. data mining and system analysis. Thank you for these suggestions.