Next Generation Job Opportunities

Page 1 of 1 [ 4 posts ] 

jimmy m
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 30 Jun 2018
Age: 70
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,250
Location: Indiana

05 Apr 2019, 9:54 am

The next generation of job opportunities are available right now. Those who have an aptitude in STEM are well suited for these positions. It is in the field of robotics.

Each chapter of the Industrial Revolution reveals a common ebb and flow in the number and makeup of jobs. As early as the steam engine, innovation displaced certain workers with new ones who, for example, had cognitive skills like creativity and problem-solving. This will continue with robots. According to the World Economic Forum, by 2022, the shifting labor division between humans, machines and algorithms will result in 75 million lost job roles, but an addition of 133 million job roles, netting 58 million.

Amazon exemplifies this dynamic. The company had about 45,000 employees when it introduced robots in 2014. Now, with upwards of 80,000 robots in operation, according to Supply Chain Management Review magazine, Amazon employs more than 600,000 workers. Similar results have been found across the organizational spectrum, from large multinational employers to small manufacturing companies.

As technologies advance through each industrial revolution, jobs—and job titles—have shifted to mirror newly required skills. In fact, a recent MIT study concluded that in the past decade, occupations boasting a 10 percent increase in job titles also grew 5 percent faster. Many unheard-of job titles, for example, emerged through the rise of cell phones, mobile apps, social media and cloud-based services.


Source: The robots are here: New, unheard-of job titles signal growing occupations in digital age



MrsPeel
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 1 Oct 2017
Age: 48
Gender: Female
Posts: 662
Location: Australia

05 Apr 2019, 11:35 pm

Yes indeed.
When everything is handled by machines, the people with jobs will be those who design/build/program/repair them.
A golden age for people with AS, maybe?



jimmy m
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 30 Jun 2018
Age: 70
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,250
Location: Indiana

06 Apr 2019, 6:38 pm

As automation and artificial intelligence technologies improve, many people worry about the future of work. If millions of human workers no longer have jobs, the worriers ask, what will people do, how will they provide for themselves and their families, and what changes might occur (or be needed) in order for society to adjust? Automation will significantly change many people’s lives in ways that may be painful and enduring.

Many economists say there is no need to worry. They point to how past major transformations in work tasks and labor markets – specifically the Industrial Revolution during the 18th and 19th centuries – did not lead to major social upheaval or widespread suffering. These economists say that when technology destroys jobs, people find other jobs. As one economist argued:

“Since the dawn of the industrial age, a recurrent fear has been that technological change will spawn mass unemployment. Neoclassical economists predicted that this would not happen, because people would find other jobs, albeit possibly after a long period of painful adjustment. By and large, that prediction has proven to be correct.”

To learn from the Industrial Revolution, we must put it in the proper historical context. The Industrial Revolution was a tipping point. For many thousands of years before it, economic growth was practically negligible, generally tracking with population growth: Farmers grew a bit more food and blacksmiths made a few more tools, but people from the early agrarian societies of Mesopotamia, Egypt, China and India would have recognized the world of 17th-century Europe.

But when steam power and industrial machinery came along in the 18th century, economic activity took off. The growth that happened in just a couple hundred years was on a vastly different scale than anything that had happened before. We may be at a similar tipping point now, referred to by some as the “Fourth Industrial Revolution,” where all that has happened in the past may appear minor compared to the productivity and profitability potential of the future.


Source: What the Industrial Revolution really tells us about the future of automation and work



BTDT
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Jul 2010
Age: 56
Gender: Female
Posts: 5,817

06 Apr 2019, 7:05 pm

I studied how robots see over 30years ago! Anyone who can learn what I did back then is likely to do well in today's job market!