if u go to overseas what jobs can u do

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ollychan
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15 May 2019, 12:05 am

?



auntblabby
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15 May 2019, 12:31 am

digital audio restoration is the only thing i know. i imagine that is something doable in any english-speaking nation, by me in any case.



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15 May 2019, 6:42 am

Pretty much anything if you have the skills and education. If you have, say, only high school education or even less than that then getting a job would be really hard in most countries.



BTDT
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15 May 2019, 8:05 am

They need engineers overseas, as far too many come to the USA for an education and don't go back home. They also need skilled construction talent for big projects like tall buildings. And doctors, they need plenty of doctors and support staff in many parts of the world. There seems to be a big shortage in the UK, base on what I've been hearing about wait times just to get a diagnoses.



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15 May 2019, 8:52 am

ollychan wrote:
If you go overseas what jobs can you do?
Tutoring science, mathematics, and English as a second language. Security systems consultant. Production assistant. Short-order cook. Electrical engineering. Possibly more, depending on what's needed.


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BeaArthur
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15 May 2019, 9:41 am

A bigger concern than what jobs you have skills for, is whether an immigrant is legally allowed to work there. Many countries have restrictions on non-citizens taking scarce jobs. Some countries don't. You should be researching this factor.


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Fnord
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15 May 2019, 9:50 am

BeaArthur wrote:
A bigger concern than what jobs you have skills for, is whether an immigrant is legally allowed to work there. Many countries have restrictions on non-citizens taking scarce jobs. Some countries don't. You should be researching this factor.
The last time I was in the far east, I had lunch a friend who told me that a certain system I was familiar with was having a few glitches. Then he offered to give me a tour of his facility, and just happened to mention to his boss that I was an expert on this sort of thing. It took about an hour of poking around and making a few adjustments to make things right, but by the end of the day, someone had upgraded my hotel room to a suite and paid off the remainder of my stay.

Sure, there are laws governing employees on the payroll, but there are also places where the law can be temporarily 'forgotten' if the need for a particular skillset is great enough, or if the person with that skillset isn't officially on the payroll.

Places like Malaysia, the Philippines, and America, for example...


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BeaArthur
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15 May 2019, 2:05 pm

Well, I've known people who thought they would go to Europe and work as a waiter, which is daft, I think. I've also known an architect, US trained, from Bulgaria; he got employment in the US but was constantly having to do more paperwork to extend his visa, and it was quite a hassle.

I mean, every country has an underground economy, but often with very inadequate worker protections. It's something a person should look into before relocating abroad!

With regard to autistic people living abroad, if you can't function in your home society, how much harder is it likely to be in a foreign country where you don't know the laws and customs, and possibly even the language?


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Fnord
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15 May 2019, 2:27 pm

BeaArthur wrote:
... With regard to autistic people living abroad, if you can't function in your home society, how much harder is it likely to be in a foreign country where you don't know the laws and customs, and possibly even the language?
To confess, being an American in a Filipino culture means that they cut me more slack than they would for one of their own, and certainly more slack than my native "white-bread" culture. For one thing, many Filipinos look up to Americans for rescuing them from the Japanese in WWII. For another, any 'aspie weirdness' on my part is usually swept to the side and blamed on cultural differences.

All I have to do in return is smile (ouch!) and be nice (double ouch!), especially when I'm in the Philippines.


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BeaArthur
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15 May 2019, 7:17 pm

A WARNING: a major route into being sex-trafficked is the promise of a job overseas. When you get there, you are forced into prostitution, and kept there by the assertion that you "owe" the trafficker for their expense in bringing you over.

Even when you are not forced into prostitution, many times you find yourself a virtual slave, working at some awful job with no ability to get away.

Be careful.


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shortfatbalduglyman
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15 May 2019, 9:34 pm

Some jobs require, license. In that state.

Move out of the country, and you have to drive a taxi

Some employers sponsor work visa

But you have to have a lot of job skills to get there