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WanderingAviator
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Age: 21
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Location: Seattle, WA

07 Oct 2019, 8:23 pm

Hi everyone, as you can probably guess from my username, I am very passionate about aviation, so I've been thinking about getting a job at Boeing. The problem is that I have little-to-no experience in any of the good jobs, which require experience in software engineering or programming, aerospace engineering, or being an assembler, and I'm stuck as a garbage boy at my local grocery store which I doubt would look good on my resume. I have no idea how to tailor my resume (since Boeing requires one) given my current situation.

My dad, who's been a Boeing employee for 30 years and is somewhat on the Spectrum himself, works as an aircraft painter, but he came in from the Navy as an avionics technician. I'm afraid that I won't have as much luck. Anyone have any ideas or suggestions?



Juliette
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11 Oct 2019, 9:52 pm

Hi :) - there are a few possibilities for you. Would you be interested in becoming a pilot? Alternatively, you could drive vehicles on the tarmac, including the de-icer(which must be done half an hour before flights). My AS son is starting a new career, to become a Flight Captain(it will take about 2 years from start to finish). If you have a driver's license, you could take the necessary physicals at the airport(quite intensive), and move onto a heavy machinery(eg bus) license, which would enable you to work at the airport as a de-icer of aircraft(using heavy machinery, computerised), and drive the luggage vehicles, as well as other machinery on the tarmac. This is what my son will be doing(4 days on, 4 days off shift work, and he'll be doing his flight training one day per week. He's already been studying for a year, while running a hair salon in London, but has decided to go for his dream. Pilots only require GCSE levels in subjects(which is a real shock to many), but of course, you need to be prepared to study very hard, learning the ins and outs of all aspects of any one particular plane that you will be flying for that airline, and it's quite a process. There are yearly tests thereafter. Just thought I'd mention it, as pilots are in short supply these days, and pay starts at £100 000(unclear on US rates) per year initially, and goes up to roughly £200 000 within a short time in the scheme of things. My thought is, that you should never limit yourself in any way, if you think that something may be impossible. You might just be surprised. All the best ...



WanderingAviator
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Joined: 10 Aug 2019
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21 Oct 2019, 10:52 pm

Being a pilot won't fly for me, I really wish it could though. The reason is that I've had suicidal tendencies in the past, and ever since the Germanwings 9525 incident a few years ago, that's an automatic disqualifier for anyone looking to become a pilot, be it private or commercial.



Juliette
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26 Oct 2019, 9:48 am

You might try studying engineering or something in that area that will link to working on the construction of aircraft parts(electronic parts/avionics to non-electronic components). Lufthansa have a huge facility in Germany, purpose-built to fit largest aircraft into its hangar. They have a constant line running there, every 6 years, every aircraft has a complete overhaul. All parts are sent off to those who specialise in each item, inspected etc etc. and so many jobs are created through this. The most dangerous job in this, is that of the guy who has to go inside of the aircraft’s wings(they have to climb through a hole) and examine every aspect ...

Reconditioning the aircraft. Someone’s job is solely just to clean all screws and bolts. It’s apparently cheaper to repair, than replace them. Everything runs like clockwork. Anyway, you could certainly work airside as a ramp agent(from baggage side, driving stairlifts, pushback tugs(they now have manless remote-controlled ones) - aircraft can’t reverse in their own), you could have a cool job as an aircraft refueler. You’d get to work very closely with the crew, pilots etc in that role. It’s a very important role, as what you do effects the performance of the aircraft on flight and landing. Being an aircraft marshaller would also be a good job - you’ve got the lights, the high-vis jacket, and you’re responsible for communicating to the pilots with hand movements to direct pilots to the correct parking position. There are all kinds of office-based jobs, customer service side, roles where people have to collate all the info(high stress though), ensuring all passengers are boarded, more of a management role that you can work up to. People who work up to that usually start airside, or on tickets etc.. You could work in cargo(from loading ... very important in the way it’s done ... certain cargo goes into specific areas). There have been some horror stories with those who have loaded aircraft incorrectly ... you might equally or even more enjoy working at a smaller aerodrome, flight schools in admin(booking in people for flight training).

You could be a firefighter at an airfield. Some places will train you for free, others expect you to be trained in driving larger vehicles(you’d need to do a course). At smaller airports, the roles you would cover would be more varied. Remember when the concorde crashed? Someone should have removed a FOD(foreign object debris) from the runway ... alot goes on behind the scenes of an airport, that many people are unaware of. Working for a body(eg FAA - Federal Aviation Authority in the US), safety inspections, accident investigation (AIBB), and so on.

Any short courses or air events, basically anything that will provide some direction and something to put down in your cover letter/resume to show you have a passion in the industry ... resumes are very specific from one industry to another. Firstly, choose a role you wish to pursue, find people you can ask, what their resume is like, or get an online sample resume(a careers event would be good .... networking etc). Asking around ...