Jobs require too many different duties

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starkid
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28 May 2020, 9:30 pm

Have you noticed that job ads list a million different job duties, some of them barely related to the actual job?

You can't just be a file clerk, you also have to provide customer service (including answering phones) and bookkeeping.

If you want to be a programmer, you have to know a zillion different languages. Web programmers have to know HTML, CSS, Javascript, PHP, SQL, and a million different JS frameworks.

Just reading it all makes me exhausted. I would like to do HTML + CSS only, but no jobs exist for that. I might be willing to learn JS on the job, but every job including entry level positions want you to know everything already. In some industries, there's no such thing as an entry-level job anymore.



Darmok
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28 May 2020, 11:49 pm

starkid wrote:
Have you noticed that job ads list a million different job duties, some of them barely related to the actual job?

You can't just be a file clerk, you also have to provide customer service (including answering phones) and bookkeeping.

If you want to be a programmer, you have to know a zillion different languages. Web programmers have to know HTML, CSS, Javascript, PHP, SQL, and a million different JS frameworks.

Just reading it all makes me exhausted. I would like to do HTML + CSS only, but no jobs exist for that. I might be willing to learn JS on the job, but every job including entry level positions want you to know everything already. In some industries, there's no such thing as an entry-level job anymore.

Part of that (and part of the reason for wording in all job ads) is legal self protection. "Starkid, I have to run an errand. Would you get my phone if it rings?" "My job description did not include answering the phone, and if you make me answer your phone I will sue you." Sadly, there are people who behave like that.

Job ads do seem to be almost comically specific sometimes. I'm waiting for one that says, "Must be able to type both capital and lowercase letters." ("You didn't tell me I had to type lowercase...")


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I love belko61
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29 May 2020, 2:21 am

My sister is a career advisor. She says to apply as long as you meet 40% of the listed qualifications - including at least two of the first three duties listed (priorities are normally listed first). You may not get the position, but you may get lucky and be one of only a handful of people who applied.
On your resume and during the interview you should sell yourself on those first few priorities listed - to prove you can fulfill the core responsibilities. You can then be trained for the other duties on the job.



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02 Jun 2020, 9:36 am

That's just how it is these days. They often expect people to have lots of experience too, yet still frown upon the idea of hiring people above 40.



Fnord
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02 Jun 2020, 9:49 am

Every job description I put out includes the words, "... and other tasks and duties as deemed necessary by supervisors, managers, and leaders."

Sometimes, I have to ask people to take out their own trash and sweep the floors of their work-spaces (for example).  While these may not be explicitly stated in their job descriptions, they are necessary tasks.


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kraftiekortie
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03 Jun 2020, 6:44 am

Most of the time, an employee actually has a narrow set of duties, but is expected to be cross-trained in other duties.

Moreover, many of these duties overlap with each other.

The same thing with college course descriptions. They look quite demanding because colleges want to remain accredited. In point of fact, these descriptions are “semantic enhancements” of what actually occurs in the course of actual classes.

Even Kindergarten curricula seem like the children cover complex material.



Aspie206
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16 Jun 2020, 11:20 pm

I’ve had many jobs that required other duties beyond the original job title. In one job, I was a stock clerk, but I also had to help customers a lot, often at night, and in a supermarket. I struggled with the customer service part, which led to a deterioration in the performance of my other duties at that job, and then termination.

It’s very exhausting for anyone on the spectrum to do job duties in addition to those of one’s current job title.



whatacrazyride
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21 Jul 2020, 10:45 pm

As a mid-level/senior manager, I include "must be able to follow instructions given by supervisor". Part of your job descriptions is to follow directions. I do 20 hours of work that is not in my job description, but when corporate tells me that I have to get up at 6:00 am on Thanksgiving for a presentation (I work for an Australian company), I better have it ready to go. My job is stressful at times, and I was recently forced to let someone go due to budget cuts; it was one of the worst on the job experiences I have had. I have had to fire a few others; Aspergers or not, there's nothing fun about that. None of this was technically in my job description, but if I want to remain employed.....

However, one poster is right; there are some keywords that I look for in regards to qualifications, but if someone could bring 60% of the qualifications to the table, they will be a serious candidate. Yes, strong interpersonal skills will be a requirement.



usagibryan
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22 Jul 2020, 8:38 am

I work in IT at a school. I just want to fix computers, but I have to...

- Monitor the students in the cafeteria
- Monitor the students crossing the street in the morning and afternoon
- Push the laptop carts around
- Manage the TV Studio
- Manage the stage equipment in the cafeteria
- Manage social media (Facebook, website, Twitter)
- Manage the weather alert system
- Keep track of non IT inventory like TVs, projector screens, janitor equipment, etc, and repairs of these things

I hate these "other duties as assigned" and feel like I shouldn't have to deal with them, but I guess it's good to get that experience, if I could remove any of these from the list it's dealing with students, I'm still not used to it and my adrenaline is always high after leaving the cafeteria, I've been here for 4 years and they still don't listen to me or respect me so I don't see the point of being in there. Apparently if I get promoted to a middle or high school I won't have to do that.



Fnord
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22 Jul 2020, 8:44 am

One of the "... other tasks and duties as deemed necessary ..." is to sit in meetings, smile, nod my head, and openly agree with whatever is being said while composing memos about that which I don't agree.

Meetings are stupid.  Just send me an email.


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starkid
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22 Jul 2020, 9:19 pm

usagibryan wrote:
- Manage social media (Facebook, website, Twitter)

This is one job duty I particularly hate. The variety of different jobs that require this is ridiculous. I've seen several online businesses looking for a web content editor and expecting the editor to manage all the website's writers, edit everything they write, and manage the company's social media as well!



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29 Jul 2020, 1:03 pm

I love belko61 wrote:
My sister is a career advisor. She says to apply as long as you meet 40% of the listed qualifications - including at least two of the first three duties listed (priorities are normally listed first). . .
I think this is very good advice. Focus on the duties listed first because these are the priorities.

And a former NASA contractor gave me this advice. Send in your resume to HR. And then . . . if you can find out the actual person doing the hire, and if you can get them on the phone, be polite and relatively brief. And the money statement seems to be, “I’ve already sent a copy of my resume to HR. May I send you a copy also?”



starkid
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29 Jul 2020, 1:49 pm

AardvarkGoodSwimmer wrote:
And a former NASA contractor gave me this advice. Send in your resume to HR. And then . . . if you can find out the actual person doing the hire, and if you can get them on the phone, be polite and relatively brief. And the money statement seems to be, “I’ve already sent a copy of my resume to HR. May I send you a copy also?”

Honestly, this is just too much work. I suppose this is manageable for someone who has applied to only a few jobs and doesn't have issues with phone calls, but given the low response rate of employers, one has to send out a zillion resumes. Maybe things are better in places where there isn't so much job competition.

All this effort is part of the reason while I'll probably never have a career (and it's also part of the reason why I don't want one).



Fnord
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29 Jul 2020, 5:06 pm

starkid wrote:
AardvarkGoodSwimmer wrote:
And a former NASA contractor gave me this advice. Send in your resume to HR. And then... if you can find out the actual person doing the hire, and if you can get them on the phone, be polite and relatively brief. And the money statement seems to be, "I’ve already sent a copy of my resume to HR. May I send you a copy also?"
Honestly, this is just too much work. I suppose this is manageable for someone who has applied to only a few jobs and doesn't have issues with phone calls, but given the low response rate of employers, one has to send out a zillion resumes.  Maybe things are better in places where there isn't so much job competition.  All this effort is part of the reason while I'll probably never have a career (and it's also part of the reason why I don't want one).
If you think having a career takes too much work, try being homeless.


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AardvarkGoodSwimmer
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29 Jul 2020, 5:47 pm

Aspie206 wrote:
. . In one job, I was a stock clerk, but I also had to help customers a lot, often at night, and in a supermarket. I struggled with the customer service part, which led to a deterioration in the performance of my other duties at that job, and then termination. .
Walmart employees just don’t practice the ten foot rule (in which, once a customer comes within ten feet, you’re supposed to make eye contact, greet them in a friendly manner, and ask if you can help them find anything).

Instead, employees subtly avert eye contact.

Because you don’t get credit at all for helping a customer, it does eat away at your time, other employees will resent it if you ask more than once or twice, and even the store manager doesn’t know where everything is or if the store carries a particular item.

* I either used to work at Walmart or know someone who did. Going to be a little cagey regarding which way.



AardvarkGoodSwimmer
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29 Jul 2020, 8:15 pm

starkid wrote:
AardvarkGoodSwimmer wrote:
Honestly, this is just too much work. I suppose this is manageable for someone who has applied to only a few jobs and doesn't have issues with phone calls, but given the low response rate of employers, one has to send out a zillion resumes. Maybe things are better in places where there isn't so much job competition.

All this effort is part of the reason while I'll probably never have a career (and it's also part of the reason why I don't want one).
I am emphatically not trying to present you with yet another task or yet another ‘should.’

At my best, I might be able to make such a phone call. And maybe two other similar tasks, and then I’d be laid low for half a day— or more.

So, it would very much not be running big numbers on my part. And I freely admit that would be a major disad to this approach.