Getting annoyed with HR departments

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DNForrest
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09 Dec 2008, 3:38 am

And the people that interviewed me. The past year and a half I've spent working my ass off to get a job, almost none of them have told me that I wasn't hired. I've had to e-mail and call them multiple times just to get an impersonal rejection e-mail from a person with whom I've usually had no contact. I can understand this happening if we were talking about a position where there's hundreds of applicants, but this is dealing with jobs for Chemical Engineers where there were just 2-10 people interviewed total, including myself. And recently, in the past 4 months, they've just ignored me completely after interviewing.



ValMikeSmith
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09 Dec 2008, 5:39 am

I have a hypothetical question for you and anyone else who may have similar skills to what I am about to describe. The question is only hypothetical because I will discuss a real project that is currently shelved and also only hypothetical because "we" are not currently organized, that is to say, business is closed now.

The business once was very small, and it's field was scientific innovation. We had an electrical engineer who did ALL of the electronics, a mechanical engineer who built ALL of the machines, and at one time we even had someone doing chemistry but not for long, and lots of chemical projects were put on hold indefinitely. So we mostly just made lots of mechanical machines, and as a small group we took requests to build a machine that could do whatever, and when business was slow we innovated randomly, making random ideas into real things (many "toys") which we sold whenever people saw them and wanted them.

Ok, the example of a shelved project I am going to use, which actually exists, is an alternative fuel powered engine. This engine can run on several different kinds of fuel but we have one specific and unique idea of what fuel should be used. It is not an unavailable chemical, in fact we have run the engine on that fuel. What is unique is where we think we can get the fuel by processing something else that is very common. This fuel should be competitive with ethanol and gasoline because of the commonness of the things that can be converted into it. I'm telling you about a real project, but unfortunately I can not offer the opportunity to help with it at all at this time. The reason I told you about this is to ask a question for you to think about. You don't have to answer "me" because this is not in any way a potential business relationship. I'm not asking you FOR anything nor offering you anything.

The question is for you to think about, and any others who may "qualify" for a hypothetical opportunity because of the nature of their skills. Remember I said that "the project" was worked on by an electrical engineer and a mechanical engineer, in a hands-on, innovative, creative, non-formal, flexible situation. Now here is the question:

If you were "here" when we worked on the engine, would you have been able to do all that would be needed to contribute to the design of a small scale process, and either build or help to build, the equipment which would convert raw material into fuel, given that it would be possible to do so, and not an unreasonably complicated process?
AND...
After completing the prototype equipment, are you creative and self-sufficient in your field enough to "play" between projects, make silly putty if you will, using your special interest in your field to explore and try new things?

And here is how the question is relevant to anyone who has self-sufficient special interest and creativity in their field: Can you work alone or with others like you in this unconventional way?

If so, to hell with HR! They do nothing but throw away all that is valuable!
If so, you probably have your own part of the means of production and may even be able to start a business even without a business loan!

Don't ask HR to help you find something to do!
Ask your peers to help you do something!

Just something to think about.



Nan
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09 Dec 2008, 9:28 am

It's annoying when they don't call you or let you know. When you interview, do you ask approximately when they expect to be making a decision? You might try that. Then, if that deadline passes and you've not been called, you can pretty much kiss the job off....



NocturnalQuilter
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09 Dec 2008, 4:26 pm

It is standard practice for most large companies to not communicate directly with a rejected candidate. That way the candidate cannot engage the person in a conversation as to why they were not selected. It's all in an effort to minimize potential discrimination suits. I know, when I worked in HR I sent out about 40-50 of those e-mails or form TBNT's (Thanks But No Thanks) letters every day. If a call actually happen to sneak through to my office all I was allowed to say is that the applicant would be receiving written notification and that I was not able to comment on the job status.

I just had an interview today for a minimum wage job in retail. I was told I "wouldn't be a good fit." The HR assistant was able to tell that in under 5 minutes. And while that sucks, I could tell by reviewing an application if the person was right for the position or not, and talking with them for a short while always confirmed that decision.



DNForrest
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09 Dec 2008, 7:20 pm

Don't mind me, I'm going through insomnia and needed to vent a bit.

And for the most part, these people also told me that they'd contact me back either way within a few days once they've finished interviewing the other people (an ominous sign in itself).