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Motherload
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14 Jan 2007, 10:25 pm

My son was diagnosed with AS, 3 years ago. I was given a Fact sheet with a list of books to read and since then I have been to support groups, got him into a good school, had him travel trained and involved him in an after school social group BUT haven't had the proper support for the home environment...Until today...I spoke to a psychologist just this morning and she mentioned that a number of paeatricians although qualified to diagnose are not able to give full support beyond that point ie. management. How can we as parents be sure that our child is getting enough or the right kind of support? Diagnosis is one thing but what we need is proper structured support from a suitably qualified psychologist to ensure both school and home management is the same. After all this time, I know the answer diagnosis then psychologist! What are your experiences?



ster
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16 Jan 2007, 6:44 am

we were referred to a LCSW immediately after the dx process....we trusted her, as we had no prior experience with any of this...should've trusted our instincts, though. she turned out to be quite a lunatic ! !! !! !! !! she didn't know anything about aspergers, but at least was trying to help us through. we found a new LCSW and for the most part like her better. the new therapist supposedly knows more about aspergers and autism, but some days i wonder.
i really don't think there's anyone around here who deals effectively with aspergers.



Pandora
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21 Jan 2007, 6:44 am

Probably not, and if you're a parent with a teenager or grown up with Asperger's it's even harder again. It's often believed that we will eventually "grow out of it". We usually improve with age as we learn coping skills but we will always be more vulnerable and always have Aspergers.


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CelticGoddess
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23 Jan 2007, 8:24 pm

My aspie son is 8 and I found that the best time for him was when he had consistency at home and at school. He's in a class specifically for kids with Aspergers and his teacher is a dream. He teaches like I parent and we make an excellent team. Because DS has the consistency at home and at school he's starting to flourish. We just got a new dev ped on his medical team that I had heard fabulous things about and I'm excited at the progress that we're making under his care. He just finished another assessment and it feels like everything is lining up as it should so that DS can be at his best. I've always parented on a strong gut instinct. I can tell pretty quickly if the person we're going to work with is good for our team, or not so good. If they work, awesome. If it's not working, we leave and we find someone else. Right now we have a developmental pediatrician, a psychotherapist, an OT, a social worker, 2 EA's at school and he's on the wait list for S&L. And I adore everyone on our team which makes a huge difference.



killer_cupcake
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30 Jan 2007, 8:56 am

I just wanted to agree w/CelticGoddess' comment about consistency. Good communication w/teachers and therapists has been hugely helpful for us. Predictability is a big deal for my son, so if he's hearing the same thing from his teachers + therapists as he is from home it helps a lot.