How to get your AS child ready/prepared to go back to school

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denjen473
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30 Jul 2008, 4:13 pm

Any suggestions on how to get your child (and teacher) ready to start a new school year like meeting with the teacher to discuss the childs issues and letting them (teacher/student) meet before the 1st day or providing info about AS for the teacher before the 1st day so they will know how to deal with your child. Any advice would be helpful!



Endersdragon
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30 Jul 2008, 5:38 pm

Go the senatoral route... lie and bribe! Oh you meant how to do more then just get him to go to school. Meet the teacher, make sure she understands his IEP, and his condition. Make sure your son understands what is going to happen like his new routine and stuff. If its a new school show him around. I am not sure what else.


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natesmom
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30 Jul 2008, 5:52 pm

Hey, I posted and it's gone. Darn it.

I will attempt to make this shorter.

Go a few days early and have him take pictures of various staff members: teachers, office staff, librarian, etc. Write their names at the bottom, if he can read (I forgot how old he is, sorry). Put them in a folder. Get to know the schedule as well. A picture schedule is often good for younger kids. Older kids seem to like it written out, although the schedule is often on the board. I would still get the schedule ahead of time.

If your son has difficulty with fire alarms, ask that he be warned or someone is with him right before the fire alarm. Also, many individuals on the spectrum do not do well with substitutes. Some parents prefer to keep kids home if there is one. It depends again on your child's age.

Make a list of possible triggers and any warning signs of triggers. Actually make a list and give it to the teacher. Tell the teacher know the child's strengths not just weaknesses. They should capitalize on the strengths as this would increase self esteem. I don't know where your child is on the spectrum but they often like doing special errands or tasks.


Social stories is something that is good to have on the IEP depending on your child. At my school, if the child had a bad social experience she would find time to sit down with the child and do a social story. she even did that with a very intelligent student. It seems to work for a lot of people. Sometimes depends on age.

It helps to have a special place in the room for the child to go to if he is overstimulated. Get a bean bag chair and somehow close it off. Some children really need this at times. One kindergarten student liked his special place to be under a desk. We had a bean bag near the desk.

Lighting: The lighting is often HORRIBLE. Some teachers have done an excellent job at keeping the florescent lights down to a minimum and using floor lamps - sometimes they need around four. That is money but you can always ask if your child is sensitive to lights. I know it even makes me feel more calm when I go into a classroom that does use fluorescent lights. All kids seem to benefit from that type of lighting. They just want to make sure that it isn't too dark otherwise it could negatively impact there vision by causing eye strain.

If he is overstimulated and a little hyper, check into fidgets and weighted vest. My child loves deep pressure at times. I don't know if he needs a weighted vest yet. We will see.

OK. I have more to say but I don't want to write a five page paper. I just type fast.

Good luck!

Karin



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31 Jul 2008, 12:37 am

Quote:
If your son has difficulty with fire alarms, ask that he be warned or someone is with him right before the fire alarm. Also, many individuals on the spectrum do not do well with substitutes. Some parents prefer to keep kids home if there is one. It depends again on your child's age.


Also prepare a short paper to be left for the substitute. I once created a mess in a classroom simply because I hadn't been told a boy had emotional problems. I found out in time that I didn't take his recess away, but still he wouldn't have spent most of the morning on the floor if I had known the way I had to act for the other kids was the absolute worst way I could act to get him under control