Page 1 of 1 [ 13 posts ] 

MaryB69
Hummingbird
Hummingbird

User avatar

Joined: 12 Jul 2008
Age: 51
Gender: Female
Posts: 23
Location: western North Carolina

18 Jan 2009, 1:18 pm

If you had the money, what one item or items would you get that would help your child? I have come across a local grant and I just need to fill out the papers and specify what we need or what for Chip. I thought about getting a folding table that we'd use for homeschooling and can pack away when it's not in use. I also thought about maybe some stuff to help him with sensory issues. He has lots of sensory issues so that's something that he really needs to work on. I'm just not sure what to get. Chip is 4 and we're homeschooling.



0_equals_true
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 5 Apr 2007
Age: 38
Gender: Male
Posts: 11,038
Location: London

19 Jan 2009, 10:35 am

This ia very specific question. It depends on the child.



ImMelody
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 9 Jun 2008
Age: 38
Gender: Female
Posts: 788
Location: DFW, TX

19 Jan 2009, 10:59 am

For my boys.. Definitely this: Rainy Day Playground


_________________
For parents with an Autism Spectrum Disorder: www.asparenting.com


DW_a_mom
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 22 Feb 2008
Age: 61
Gender: Female
Posts: 11,012
Location: Northern California

19 Jan 2009, 2:03 pm

My answer isn't going to help you at all, since it is totally specific to my child and probably would cost far more than one grant could provide, but since we're dreaming, here goes.

A giant, well padded and very long pacing room. Things to climb over, jump on, and padded walls to ram into. Forgot the ideas that run into our heads when we talk about padded rooms; my son WANTS something like this.

And all our furniture and walls in the rest of the house would be SO happy.


_________________
Mom to an amazing AS son, who recently graduated from the university (plus an also amazing non-AS daughter). Most likely part of the "Broader Autism Phenotype" (some traits).


ster
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Sep 2005
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,485
Location: new england

19 Jan 2009, 2:55 pm

small manipulatives to increase fine motor skills.....weighted vest.....indoor swing......trampoline



Aspie1
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 7 Mar 2005
Gender: Male
Posts: 5,707
Location: United States

19 Jan 2009, 3:41 pm

When I was a kid, I absolutely loved rapidly changing lights patterns, not unlike those in dance clubs or at concerts. When I was six, my grandparents once took me to a concert for kids, with people dressed as characters from fairytales singing and dancing on stage. Well, guess what? I spent more time watching the flashing lights illuminating the stage than I spent watching the show. Afterwards, I could remember all the light colors, but not everything the performers did or sang, let alone any of their names when they introduced themselves after the show.

So if your child is anything like I was, get him a light machine of some sorts. It could be a laser light show projector, a flashing lights device, a cable light that changes colors, or something more tame, like a multicolor lava or glitter lamp. I don't recommend strobe lights, because they can trigger seizures in some people, or black lights, because they emit low doses of ultraviolet light, which can harm the eyes if you look directly at them. (Although if a black light is positioned so that you can't see the bulb, it's fairly safe.) They also have special goggles with little screens in front of the eyes, and the lights shows on them are amazing. But they were outrageously expensive, and I don't know where to find them now; since Sharper Image, who used to sell them, went out of business last year.



Nan
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 1 Mar 2006
Age: 64
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,795

20 Jan 2009, 3:26 pm

a computer.



Fnord
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 May 2008
Gender: Male
Posts: 43,371
Location: Stendec

20 Jan 2009, 3:32 pm

MaryB69 wrote:
If you had the money, what one item or items would you get that would help your child?

Guaranteed pre-admission to an Ivy League university.


_________________
Since there is no singular, absolute definition of human nature, nor any ultimate evaluation of
human nature beyond that which we project onto others, individuals should only be judged or defined
by their actions and choices, and not by what we imagine their intentions and motivations to be.


RightGalaxy
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 21 Dec 2008
Age: 60
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,774

22 Jan 2009, 10:24 am

MaryB69 wrote:
If you had the money, what one item or items would you get that would help your child? I have come across a local grant and I just need to fill out the papers and specify what we need or what for Chip. I thought about getting a folding table that we'd use for homeschooling and can pack away when it's not in use. I also thought about maybe some stuff to help him with sensory issues. He has lots of sensory issues so that's something that he really needs to work on. I'm just not sure what to get. Chip is 4 and we're homeschooling.


I'd get private special ed that uses visiting therapists for language, occupational therapy, child psychologists, etc... sometimes it takes a professional to tell you exactly what your child needs. Sometimes, out of the norm behavior is sometimes easier seen by an outsider looking in.



Last edited by RightGalaxy on 22 Jan 2009, 11:29 am, edited 1 time in total.

MommyJones
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 3 Dec 2008
Age: 54
Gender: Female
Posts: 684
Location: United States

22 Jan 2009, 10:38 am

I would definately invest in any kind of professional therapy you can afford. Speech, OT, ABA, depending on your childs needs. As for homeschooling, I would look to catalogs like Learning Resources, Different Roads to Learning, Beyond Play early intervention products, LinguiSystems, Abilitations, or Enabling Devices or others in that area. You can get really good interactive and learning materials specific for these kids. Professional therapists can also help you with these resources.



a_mom
Butterfly
Butterfly

User avatar

Joined: 12 Jan 2009
Gender: Female
Posts: 9

22 Jan 2009, 12:55 pm

I have a big nylon "sock" that my daughter LOVES!! Music therapy uses it and she can't get enough of it. I can't get her out of the thing! It is stretchy, with velcro enclosure to climb in and out of, probably 3-4 feet high, but stretches to her height, making her use her muscles. We get her to do all kinds of activities that she normally fought us on, when she is in this sock. By the way, she is 10 years old, autism, mod/severe mr, and epilepsy.
This sock was about $40, so depending on the amount of the grant, I'd get one of these, plus lots of sensory tools, as she is very much SI.
Lucky You!! Wish I could find a grant to help me out with expenses! Amazing how expensive these kiddos are :D



ouinon
Supporting Member
Supporting Member

User avatar

Joined: 10 Jul 2007
Age: 56
Gender: Female
Posts: 5,939
Location: Europe

22 Jan 2009, 1:00 pm

Nan wrote:
a computer.

Ditto Ditto Ditto

My son home-unschools and, ( apart from books which he loves since learning to read at 7 and a half, and pencils and paper for drawing ), the computer, with internet connection, is what he uses the most.

.



MaryB69
Hummingbird
Hummingbird

User avatar

Joined: 12 Jul 2008
Age: 51
Gender: Female
Posts: 23
Location: western North Carolina

22 Jan 2009, 7:49 pm

Thank you all so much for all the replies!! I've gotten the paperwork filled out. My son already has a computer which was given to him a while back. On the grant I asked for the following: echo microphones (to help me help him with his speech), sensory balls, utensils for working with playdoh (I can make the playdoh), lacing beads and laces (which I can use for either lacing or sorting or counting), fingerpaints and accessories (can help with the sensory issues), velcro and clear contact paper (I'm making my own PECS binder and calendar for him), folding table (for homeschooling since our kitchen table isn't big enough), vinyl table cloth for under the table (to catch any messes), v-smile and a couple of games (he learns so much from video games I figured this might help him), dry erase markers (for using with our laminated calendar), counters and containers for sorting them (to help him with counting and sorting skills), sidewalk chalk (the boys' bedroom walls are almost all chalkboards), 6 stove knob covers (the stove knobs are on the front of the stove and I don't want him turning them), and 2 cabinet door locks with keys (for medication and cleaning supplies).