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Tim_Tex
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10 Dec 2011, 5:05 am

In this case, "the man" is used like in the phrase "sticking it to 'the man'". In the Civil Rights movement, it was used to refer to the white authority establishment in the South (the George Wallace, Orval Faubus, or Bull Connor-types).

The phrase is still in use today, but who exactly is "the man" currently?



kxmode
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10 Dec 2011, 5:09 am

When someone can't figure out how to use the Blu-ray player they consult "the man"ual.



Tim_Tex
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10 Dec 2011, 7:17 am

I guess the "1%" (from the Occupy movements) could fit the description.



pandabear
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10 Dec 2011, 10:18 am

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Man

Quote:
"The Man" is a slang phrase that may refer to the government or to some other authority in a position of power. In addition to this derogatory connotation, it may also serve as a term of respect and praise.

The phrase "the Man is keeping me down" is commonly used to describe oppression. The phrase "stick it to the Man" or "The man, stick it to him" encourages resistance to authority, and essentially means "fight back" or "resist", either openly or via sabotage

History

The term "the Man" in the American sense dates back to the late 19th Century. [2] In the Southern U.S. states, the phrase came to be applied to any man or any group in a position of authority, or to authority in the abstract. From about the 1950s the phrase was also an underworld code word for police, the warden of a prison or other law enforcement or penal authorities.

It was also used as a term for a drug dealer in the 1950s and 1960s and can be seen in such media as Curtis Mayfield's "No Thing On Me"; Jonathan Larson's Rent, William Burroughs's novel Naked Lunch, and in the Velvet Underground song "I'm Waiting for the Man", in which Lou Reed sings about going to Uptown Manhattan, specifically Lexington Avenue and 125th Street, to buy heroin.

The use of this term was expanded to counterculture groups and their battles against authority, such as the Yippies, which, according to a May 19, 1969 article in U.S. News and World Report, had the "avowed aim ... to destroy 'The Man', their term for the present system of government". The term eventually found its way into humorous usage, such as in a December 1979 motorcycle ad from the magazine Easyriders which featured the tagline, "California residents: Add 6% sales tax for The Man."

In present day, the phrase has been popularized in commercials and cinema.

Use as praise

The term has also been used as an approbation or form of praise. This may refer to the recipient's status as the leader or authority within a particular context, or it might be assumed to be a shortened form of a phrase like "He is the man (who is in charge)." One example of this usage dates to 1879 when Otto von Bismarck commented, referring to Benjamin Disraeli's pre-eminent position at the Congress of Berlin, "The old Jew, he is the man." [3]

In more modern usage, it can be a superlative compliment ("you da man!") indicating that the subject is currently standing out amongst his peers even though they have no special designation or rank, such as a basketball player who is performing better than the other players on the court. It can also be used as a genuine compliment with an implied, slightly exaggerated or sarcastic tone, usually indicating that the person has indeed impressed the speaker but by doing something relatively trivial.



I haven't heard the phrase used much myself, but I really don't get out much, anyway.



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10 Dec 2011, 10:31 am

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3PGNCeVuYBw[/youtube]


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blauSamstag
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10 Dec 2011, 10:31 am

YOU da man!



artrat
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10 Dec 2011, 8:28 pm

It means the government or a figure of authority.

"sticking it to the man" means to rise up against a person or government that abuses power.

The man could be a politician,cop,a corrupt corporation,lawyer, the entire government or anyone else with power.



pandabear
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10 Dec 2011, 9:34 pm

peebo
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11 Dec 2011, 3:27 am

it can also refer to someone at or near the top of the hierarchy of a social or subcultural group.

Image


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11 Dec 2011, 3:53 am

Tim_Tex wrote:
In this case, "the man" is used like in the phrase "sticking it to 'the man'". In the Civil Rights movement, it was used to refer to the white authority establishment in the South (the George Wallace, Orval Faubus, or Bull Connor-types).

The phrase is still in use today, but who exactly is "the man" currently?


I do not think it can be narrowed down to just one, but I would say 'the man' would be those people who are running things, those elusive :pig: bastards that never seem to have a specific name for their little club.