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ooOoOoOAnaOoOoOoo
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07 Jul 2015, 7:44 pm

They seem similar:

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transcendentalism :

Quote:
The transcendentalists desired to ground their religion and philosophy in transcendental principles: principles not based on, or falsifiable by, physical experience, but deriving from the inner spiritual or mental essence of the human.


Quote:
Even with this necessary individuality, the transcendentalists also believed that all people possessed a piece of the "Over-soul"[9] (God). Because the Over-soul is one, this also united all people as one being.



From http://www.ushistory.org/us/26f.asp

Quote:
TRANSCENDENTALISM is a very formal word that describes a very simple idea. People, men and women equally, have knowledge about themselves and the world around them that "transcends" or goes beyond what they can see, hear, taste, touch or feel.

This knowledge comes through intuition and imagination not through logic or the senses. People can trust themselves to be their own authority on what is right. A TRANSCENDENTALIST is a person who accepts these ideas not as religious beliefs but as a way of understanding life relationships.


From http://www.transcendentalists.com/what.htm :

Quote:
In the words of Ralph Waldo Emerson, "We will walk on our own feet; we will work with our own hands; we will speak our own minds...A nation of men will for the first time exist, because each believes himself inspired by the Divine Soul which also inspires all men."


From http://www.emersoncentral.com/transcendentalist.htm :

Quote:
The Transcendentalist adopts the whole connection of spiritual doctrine. He believes in miracle, in the perpetual openness of the human mind to new influx of light and power; he believes in inspiration, and in ecstasy. He wishes that the spiritual principle should be suffered to demonstrate itself to the end, in all possible applications to the state of man, without the admission of anything unspiritual; that is, anything positive, dogmatic, personal. Thus, the spiritual measure of inspiration is the depth of the thought, and never, who said it? And so he resists all attempts to palm other rules and measures on the spirit than its own.


I am feeling closer to Emerson although I always liked Laura Ingalls Wilder's books.

Anyone consider themselves a transcendentalist or is at least interested in the subject? While reading about it, I notice how it resembles gnosticism. People were attempting to connect with the divine, not through the corrupt orthodoxy, but by using the divine fire within their souls.



Fnord
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07 Jul 2015, 8:20 pm

Sweet prose; nothing more.



blauSamstag
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07 Jul 2015, 8:22 pm

My dad studied the transcendentalists in depth.

When you really dig into their writings, there are a lot of inside jokes, and convenient omissions.

RWE was in fact total pants at carpentry.

HDT neglects to mention that he went back into town every Wednesday to have his mother do his laundry.



justkillingtime
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07 Jul 2015, 8:32 pm

I had a friend who was a transcendentalist. She was a member of the Thoreau Society -http://www.thoreausociety.org


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ooOoOoOAnaOoOoOoo
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07 Jul 2015, 8:35 pm

blauSamstag wrote:
My dad studied the transcendentalists in depth.

When you really dig into their writings, there are a lot of inside jokes, and convenient omissions.

RWE was in fact total pants at carpentry.

HDT neglects to mention that he went back into town every Wednesday to have his mother do his laundry.



The overall idea being there's personal pride in striving to do things yourself, plus, for example, if you are actively participating in the construction of your own house; and I know most people cannot do the entire thing themselves, although that was more feasible in Emerson's day and before, building a simple log cabin or digging out a soddy, by participating in picking out the land, contractors, design, building materials, your house will be done your specifications.

Transcendentalists ask what can be garnered from self participation instead of just letting others do it for you?



ooOoOoOAnaOoOoOoo
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07 Jul 2015, 8:45 pm

justkillingtime wrote:
I had a friend who was a transcendentalist. She was a member of the Thoreau Society -http://www.thoreausociety.org


I had a hand sized edition of Walden and used to read it to family but haven't studied much Transcendentalism until today. I wanted to take a deeper look for Transcendent Tuesdays, today being the first one but I want to make it something that happens every Tuesday from now on.

I have felt this connection to nature, love the oceans, the Grand Canyon, which I spent a week camping at, during the last week of October when the lows were around 19 degrees fahrenheit but the days were lovely. I managed to last seven days but it was so cold at night, I had to sleep in the car instead of the tent and it was still really cold but I toughed it out because there was lots to do during the day and at that altitude, I felt warm when the sun was out but that first full day a cold front came through with wind, clouds, and I was so close to throwing in the towel and going home but I still had about a thousand miles between me and there and wanted to get some sleep first and once it warmed up, it became tolerable but the nights stayed the same temperature the entire time. I brought plenty of fire logs even though they had a little store in the Grand Canyon Park that sold them, along with about fifty mules, a few elks, an assortment of squirrels and plenty of ravens. They also had coffee.

I have this interest in hiking the Appalachian Trail in summer but need to find a way to get there first.



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07 Jul 2015, 9:03 pm

ooOoOoOAnaOoOoOoo wrote:
blauSamstag wrote:
My dad studied the transcendentalists in depth.

When you really dig into their writings, there are a lot of inside jokes, and convenient omissions.

RWE was in fact total pants at carpentry.

HDT neglects to mention that he went back into town every Wednesday to have his mother do his laundry.



The overall idea being there's personal pride in striving to do things yourself, plus, for example, if you are actively participating in the construction of your own house; and I know most people cannot do the entire thing themselves, although that was more feasible in Emerson's day and before, building a simple log cabin or digging out a soddy, by participating in picking out the land, contractors, design, building materials, your house will be done your specifications.

Transcendentalists ask what can be garnered from self participation instead of just letting others do it for you?


Which one of them was it that went to Brook Farm and ended up stating "By mid-day the better part of the man is shoveled onto the dung heap"?

Thoreau? That guy didn't know beans.



ooOoOoOAnaOoOoOoo
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07 Jul 2015, 9:07 pm

blauSamstag wrote:

Which one of them was it that went to Brook Farm and ended up stating "By mid-day the better part of the man is shoveled onto the dung heap"?

Thoreau? That guy didn't know beans.


Farms - blah. Thoreau is about camping, hiking and woods.



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07 Jul 2015, 9:11 pm

ooOoOoOAnaOoOoOoo wrote:
blauSamstag wrote:

Which one of them was it that went to Brook Farm and ended up stating "By mid-day the better part of the man is shoveled onto the dung heap"?

Thoreau? That guy didn't know beans.


Farms - blah. Thoreau is about camping, hiking and woods.


Yes, but still having your mother do the laundry.



ooOoOoOAnaOoOoOoo
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07 Jul 2015, 9:14 pm

blauSamstag wrote:
ooOoOoOAnaOoOoOoo wrote:
blauSamstag wrote:

Which one of them was it that went to Brook Farm and ended up stating "By mid-day the better part of the man is shoveled onto the dung heap"?

Thoreau? That guy didn't know beans.


Farms - blah. Thoreau is about camping, hiking and woods.


Yes, but still having your mother do the laundry.



Mom doing it but not church or government.



ooOoOoOAnaOoOoOoo
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07 Jul 2015, 9:16 pm

One of the few places that's truly transcendent these days is Alaska but it's so cold and there's not a lot of indoor plumbing plus you have to do things like hunt. Farming would be difficult.



blauSamstag
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07 Jul 2015, 9:37 pm

ooOoOoOAnaOoOoOoo wrote:
blauSamstag wrote:
ooOoOoOAnaOoOoOoo wrote:
blauSamstag wrote:

Which one of them was it that went to Brook Farm and ended up stating "By mid-day the better part of the man is shoveled onto the dung heap"?

Thoreau? That guy didn't know beans.


Farms - blah. Thoreau is about camping, hiking and woods.


Yes, but still having your mother do the laundry.



Mom doing it but not church or government.



It might be a stretch to extrapolate his disdain for slavery and war and belief that "That government is best which governs least" as an endorsement of what we recognize as libertarian views today.



ooOoOoOAnaOoOoOoo
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07 Jul 2015, 10:35 pm

blauSamstag wrote:

It might be a stretch to extrapolate his disdain for slavery and war and belief that "That government is best which governs least" as an endorsement of what we recognize as libertarian views today.


They went to ivy league schools and were tired of the ivy league attitude. They saw church and government as corrupt and from what we can tell, they are. The answer to this was to go hide away in the woods where you talked to animals and stared at ponds all day or whatever works for you. I went to the Grand Canyon. Problem is, it's difficult to have that transcendental experience in a parking lot so it's best to go during off season times but then it's very uncomfortable, as in, it's too cold. Campgrounds in the Grand Canyon Park can resemble parking lots during peak times. I cannot transcend in a parking lot. People always want to bring their five or six suvs with them when they go camping.



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07 Jul 2015, 10:45 pm

ooOoOoOAnaOoOoOoo wrote:
blauSamstag wrote:

It might be a stretch to extrapolate his disdain for slavery and war and belief that "That government is best which governs least" as an endorsement of what we recognize as libertarian views today.


They went to ivy league schools and were tired of the ivy league attitude. They saw church and government as corrupt and from what we can tell, they are. The answer to this was to go hide away in the woods where you talked to animals and stared at ponds all day or whatever works for you. I went to the Grand Canyon. Problem is, it's difficult to have that transcendental experience in a parking lot so it's best to go during off season times but then it's very uncomfortable, as in, it's too cold. Campgrounds in the Grand Canyon Park can resemble parking lots during peak times. I cannot transcend in a parking lot. People always want to bring their five or six suvs with them when they go camping.


Have you read Walden?

Here's the first few lines of chapter 6, "Visitors":

Quote:
I THINK THAT I LOVE SOCIETY as much as most, and am ready enough to fasten myself like a bloodsucker for the time to any full-blooded man that comes in my way. I am naturally no hermit, but might possibly sit out the sturdiest frequenter of the bar-room, if my business called me thither.

I had three chairs in my house; one for solitude, two for friendship, three for society. When visitors came in larger and unexpected numbers there was but the third chair for them all, but they generally economized the room by standing up. It is surprising how many great men and women a small house will contain. I have had twenty-five or thirty souls, with their bodies, at once under my roof, and yet we often parted without being aware that we had come very near to one another.



ooOoOoOAnaOoOoOoo
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07 Jul 2015, 10:53 pm

blauSamstag wrote:
ooOoOoOAnaOoOoOoo wrote:
blauSamstag wrote:

It might be a stretch to extrapolate his disdain for slavery and war and belief that "That government is best which governs least" as an endorsement of what we recognize as libertarian views today.


They went to ivy league schools and were tired of the ivy league attitude. They saw church and government as corrupt and from what we can tell, they are. The answer to this was to go hide away in the woods where you talked to animals and stared at ponds all day or whatever works for you. I went to the Grand Canyon. Problem is, it's difficult to have that transcendental experience in a parking lot so it's best to go during off season times but then it's very uncomfortable, as in, it's too cold. Campgrounds in the Grand Canyon Park can resemble parking lots during peak times. I cannot transcend in a parking lot. People always want to bring their five or six suvs with them when they go camping.


Have you read Walden?

Here's the first few lines of chapter 6, "Visitors":

Quote:
I THINK THAT I LOVE SOCIETY as much as most, and am ready enough to fasten myself like a bloodsucker for the time to any full-blooded man that comes in my way. I am naturally no hermit, but might possibly sit out the sturdiest frequenter of the bar-room, if my business called me thither.

I had three chairs in my house; one for solitude, two for friendship, three for society. When visitors came in larger and unexpected numbers there was but the third chair for them all, but they generally economized the room by standing up. It is surprising how many great men and women a small house will contain. I have had twenty-five or thirty souls, with their bodies, at once under my roof, and yet we often parted without being aware that we had come very near to one another.

I used to read the pocket sized edition, this really small Walden paperback book, to family years ago but it eventually got lost and I forgot most of it so it's been a while since I've read any of it. I get what it's about, Grizzly Adams type guy living with the animals and nature as opposed to crowded cities.



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07 Jul 2015, 11:16 pm

ooOoOoOAnaOoOoOoo wrote:
blauSamstag wrote:
ooOoOoOAnaOoOoOoo wrote:
blauSamstag wrote:

It might be a stretch to extrapolate his disdain for slavery and war and belief that "That government is best which governs least" as an endorsement of what we recognize as libertarian views today.


They went to ivy league schools and were tired of the ivy league attitude. They saw church and government as corrupt and from what we can tell, they are. The answer to this was to go hide away in the woods where you talked to animals and stared at ponds all day or whatever works for you. I went to the Grand Canyon. Problem is, it's difficult to have that transcendental experience in a parking lot so it's best to go during off season times but then it's very uncomfortable, as in, it's too cold. Campgrounds in the Grand Canyon Park can resemble parking lots during peak times. I cannot transcend in a parking lot. People always want to bring their five or six suvs with them when they go camping.


Have you read Walden?

Here's the first few lines of chapter 6, "Visitors":

Quote:
I THINK THAT I LOVE SOCIETY as much as most, and am ready enough to fasten myself like a bloodsucker for the time to any full-blooded man that comes in my way. I am naturally no hermit, but might possibly sit out the sturdiest frequenter of the bar-room, if my business called me thither.

I had three chairs in my house; one for solitude, two for friendship, three for society. When visitors came in larger and unexpected numbers there was but the third chair for them all, but they generally economized the room by standing up. It is surprising how many great men and women a small house will contain. I have had twenty-five or thirty souls, with their bodies, at once under my roof, and yet we often parted without being aware that we had come very near to one another.

I used to read the pocket sized edition, this really small Walden paperback book, to family years ago but it eventually got lost and I forgot most of it so it's been a while since I've read any of it. I get what it's about, Grizzly Adams type guy living with the animals and nature as opposed to crowded cities.



Ehh, sort of.

The two years at walden pond were Thoreau's most productive years.

Emerson agreed to let him live there if he clear some land and replant trees.

In the first year at the pond, he:

Built a house

Cleared two and a half acres of land (without earth-moving equipment)

Replanted those acres with: potatoes, corn, peas, turnips and approximately 20,000 bean plants totaling approximately 7 miles of bean rows.

Produced two drafts of "A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers"

Wrote a lecture about Thomas Carlyle

Wrote a lecture titled "A History of Myself"

Did odd jobs for money including ‘surveying, carpentry and day-labor of various other kinds' -- including building a fence for Emerson. By his own estimation, he worked for money about 1 day a week.

He roughed it just a little. And he had frequent visitors, approaching daily visitors. He wasn't that far from town, and quite close to Emerson's house.

Various people lived with him at various times, including the occasional fugitive slave and at one point a friend slept on his floor for 2 weeks.

There is a lot of tongue-in-cheek humor in Thoreau's writing. And no shortage of private jokes for his close friends. You can't read any of it too literally.