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Kraichgauer
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30 Jan 2019, 3:29 pm

TW1ZTY wrote:
AspE wrote:
What's so great about a homeless camp? Get them into housing, job training, treatment programs for addiction and mental illness. You aren't doing them any favors by letting them rot by the roadside in unsanitary conditions, begging for drug money.


You do realize that's easier said than done right? If helping the homeless was as easy as that there wouldn't be so many homeless people in this country.

The only thing I can do is give money whenever I have it. Even if all they do is buy drugs with it at least it helps them temporarily forget about how much our society sucks.


I'm a softhearted sucker, too.


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techstepgenr8tion
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30 Jan 2019, 8:19 pm

I like Tulsi, also I've seen a lot of hype around someone I've never heard of before - ie. Marianne Williamson? Not sure where that will go, she's sort of in the Anthony Robbins type motivational space slash new age and has decided to run.


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31 Jan 2019, 6:07 am

I would like for John Hickenlooper to run.

Brian Sandoval and Susana Martinez would make good GOP primary challengers.


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31 Jan 2019, 7:37 pm

Darmok wrote:
I just want to make it clear right now that I am not a candidate. If nominated I will not run, if elected I will not serve. No importunings, expensive gifts, sports cars, Russian supermodels, Caribbean vacations, or giant ice cream sundaes will make me change my mind. And I'm absolutely positive that that's probably the case.

We have ways of making you serve, Mr President.


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Magna
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01 Feb 2019, 8:57 am

Cory Booker is in. I've had a theory for many years that for some reason people seem like they won't vote for a bald man for president. Basing a vote in part or even subconsciously on such a thing makes no sense, but I've always wondered if there's something to that.


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ASPartOfMe
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01 Feb 2019, 9:14 am

Magna wrote:
Cory Booker is in. I've had a theory for many years that for some reason people seem like they won't vote for a bald man for president. Basing a vote in part or even subconsciously on such a thing makes no sense, but I've always wondered if there's something to that.

Cory Booker announces he is running for president
Quote:
Sen. Cory Booker, a New Jersey Democrat who rose to prominence as Newark's charismatic and ambitious mayor, announced Friday that he is running for president.

Booker chose the first day of Black History Month to launch his campaign, timing that nods to Booker's own heritage and suggests he will put it at the center of his pitch to voters.

"The history of our nation is defined by collective action; by interwoven destinies of slaves and abolitionists; of those born here and those who chose America as home; of those who took up arms to defend our country, and those who linked arms to challenge and change it," Booker narrates in a video released on Friday morning, which features him walking through his Newark neighborhood.

"I'm Cory Booker and I'm running for president of the United States of America," he says in the video.

Booker plans to head to Iowa February 8-9 and then to South Carolina on February 10. He also intends to visit New Hampshire over Presidents Day weekend.

In his announcement video, Booker also notes that he is "the only senator who goes home to a low-income, inner city community" in Newark, "the first community that took a chance on me."
In the Senate, Booker has at times favored a pragmatic approach, teaming up with like-minded Republicans on issues like criminal justice. But he has also emerged as a passionate interrogator of President Donald Trump's nominees -- including Justice Brett Kavanaugh, at whose confirmation hearing Booker memorably unloaded in a heated "Spartacus moment."

Public polling suggests Booker is unknown to many Americans. But in a field where there is no clear front-runner, he brings a raw political talent that some Democrats believe could make him a powerful contender.
The campaign message of Booker, who's a gifted orator on the stump, will center on his signature themes of finding "common purpose" and a bringing about a "revival of civic grace" in American society, drawing a stark, if implicit, contrast with President Donald Trump's harsh rhetoric.

It's unclear how Booker's record as mayor will play in the Democratic primary or beyond. Critics say Booker did not meet his lofty promises to reshape the city, with some progressives faulting his support for school choice, among other issues. But Booker's allies believe this chapter of his story will be an asset, affording Booker some distance from Washington and demonstrating his executive chops.

As a senator, Booker has sought to sand off some of his rough political edges ahead of 2020, burnishing his progressive credentials by signing on to policies such as "Medicare-for-all." Last year, he announced he would no longer accept corporate PAC money; some progressives have been skeptical of Booker for the support he has received from Wall Street donors. Booker will also oppose super PACS supporting his candidacy or others.
Reflecting its central place in Booker's story, Newark will be the headquarters for his campaign.

His campaign manager will be Addisu Demissie, a veteran of Booker's 2013 Senate race, who most recently ran Gavin Newsom's successful bid for California governor. Demissie also boasts experience on the ground in Iowa, having cut his teeth as a field organizer for John Kerry's 2004 caucus campaign, returning in the 2008 cycle on behalf of Hillary Clinton.

Other top campaign officials announced Friday include Jenna Lowenstein, who formerly ran Connecticut Democratic Sen. Chris Murphy's 2018 re-election campaign, as deputy campaign manager; Booker's Senate chief of staff Matt Klapper as senior adviser; and Modia Butler, a longtime Booker adviser dating back to his days in Newark, as senior strategist.

To steer his Iowa operation, Booker has already lined up a team of sought-after operatives: Michael Frosolone, who led Iowa Democrats' statehouse campaigns in 2018; Joe O'Hern, who ran the Democratic coordinated campaign in Ohio during the midterms and oversaw Martin O'Malley's 2016 caucus efforts; Haley Hager, most recently the Iowa director for Tom Steyer's NextGen group targeting young voters; and Tess Seger, outgoing communications director for the Iowa Democratic Party.

To steer his Iowa operation, Booker has already lined up a team of sought-after operatives: Michael Frosolone, who led Iowa Democrats' statehouse campaigns in 2018; Joe O'Hern, who ran the Democratic coordinated campaign in Ohio during the midterms and oversaw Martin O'Malley's 2016 caucus efforts; Haley Hager, most recently the Iowa director for Tom Steyer's NextGen group targeting young voters; and Tess Seger, outgoing communications director for the Iowa Democratic Party.

As a talented and ambitious black politician, Booker has elicited predictable comparisons to former President Barack Obama, whom he endorsed during the 2008 primary and campaigned for in 2012.

Booker has acknowledged the trope and jokes about it, but he doesn't neatly fit the mold. Whereas Obama often was guarded and serious, Booker is an extrovert whose unbridled enthusiasm and brimming energy can seem almost comical.

In some ways, Booker is a political heir to former President Jimmy Carter, who in the aftermath of the Nixon administration pledged a government "as good and honest and decent and compassionate and filled with love as are the American people." Booker recently described Carter as a "moral (giant) in America" and a model for "what I want my message to be in leadership." Carter, for his part, had urged Booker to run for president.


Unlike the mid terms where the congressional candidates ran based on thier district and largly stayed free of contentious issues the Presidential candidates in the very early going have felt the need to emphasize identity politics and at least play with socialist ideas such as medicare for all and Green New Deal. At some point they are going to have to answer questions about very late term abortions and impeachment. While America is a pro choice country I do not think most favor “up to birth” abortions.

This begs the question although believed to a shrinking despised minority in the Democratic party can a “centrist” candidate such as Mike Bloomberg or Hillary win the nomination by default because the “progressive” vote is split multiple ways?


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Kraichgauer
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01 Feb 2019, 10:45 am

Magna wrote:
Cory Booker is in. I've had a theory for many years that for some reason people seem like they won't vote for a bald man for president. Basing a vote in part or even subconsciously on such a thing makes no sense, but I've always wondered if there's something to that.


What do you mean? Eisenhower was bald.


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Tim_Tex
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01 Feb 2019, 10:54 am

Kraichgauer wrote:
Magna wrote:
Cory Booker is in. I've had a theory for many years that for some reason people seem like they won't vote for a bald man for president. Basing a vote in part or even subconsciously on such a thing makes no sense, but I've always wondered if there's something to that.


What do you mean? Eisenhower was bald.


As was John Quincy Adams--smartest president ever!


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kraftiekortie
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01 Feb 2019, 11:21 am

Eisenhower was bald as a bowling ball! Since at least World War II.

In fact, in 1952 and 1956, TWO bald or partially bald candidates ran for President.

The term "egghead" for "nerdy intellectual" was partially inspired by the balding intellectual Adlai Ewing Stevenson.



Magna
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01 Feb 2019, 12:23 pm

Kraichgauer wrote:
Magna wrote:
Cory Booker is in. I've had a theory for many years that for some reason people seem like they won't vote for a bald man for president. Basing a vote in part or even subconsciously on such a thing makes no sense, but I've always wondered if there's something to that.


What do you mean? Eisenhower was bald.


I thought of him. He's one of the only exceptions. It's just a theory...


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I'm nothing but a stranger in this world" -Van Morrison

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EQ-14 out of 80
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Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 39 of 200
You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)


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01 Feb 2019, 4:34 pm

Unrelated but I once argued to my friend that no Superheroes are bald because bald ppl are deemed as evil, cowards, or/and intellectually illiberal


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01 Feb 2019, 4:53 pm

ASPartOfMe wrote:
Magna wrote:
Cory Booker is in. I've had a theory for many years that for some reason people seem like they won't vote for a bald man for president. Basing a vote in part or even subconsciously on such a thing makes no sense, but I've always wondered if there's something to that.

Cory Booker announces he is running for president
[spoiler]
Quote:
Sen. Cory Booker, a New Jersey Democrat who rose to prominence as Newark's charismatic and ambitious mayor, announced Friday that he is running for president.

Booker chose the first day of Black History Month to launch his campaign, timing that nods to Booker's own heritage and suggests he will put it at the center of his pitch to voters.

"The history of our nation is defined by collective action; by interwoven destinies of slaves and abolitionists; of those born here and those who chose America as home; of those who took up arms to defend our country, and those who linked arms to challenge and change it," Booker narrates in a video released on Friday morning, which features him walking through his Newark neighborhood.

"I'm Cory Booker and I'm running for president of the United States of America," he says in the video.

Booker plans to head to Iowa February 8-9 and then to South Carolina on February 10. He also intends to visit New Hampshire over Presidents Day weekend.

In his announcement video, Booker also notes that he is "the only senator who goes home to a low-income, inner city community" in Newark, "the first community that took a chance on me."
In the Senate, Booker has at times favored a pragmatic approach, teaming up with like-minded Republicans on issues like criminal justice. But he has also emerged as a passionate interrogator of President Donald Trump's nominees -- including Justice Brett Kavanaugh, at whose confirmation hearing Booker memorably unloaded in a heated "Spartacus moment."

Public polling suggests Booker is unknown to many Americans. But in a field where there is no clear front-runner, he brings a raw political talent that some Democrats believe could make him a powerful contender.
The campaign message of Booker, who's a gifted orator on the stump, will center on his signature themes of finding "common purpose" and a bringing about a "revival of civic grace" in American society, drawing a stark, if implicit, contrast with President Donald Trump's harsh rhetoric.

It's unclear how Booker's record as mayor will play in the Democratic primary or beyond. Critics say Booker did not meet his lofty promises to reshape the city, with some progressives faulting his support for school choice, among other issues. But Booker's allies believe this chapter of his story will be an asset, affording Booker some distance from Washington and demonstrating his executive chops.

As a senator, Booker has sought to sand off some of his rough political edges ahead of 2020, burnishing his progressive credentials by signing on to policies such as "Medicare-for-all." Last year, he announced he would no longer accept corporate PAC money; some progressives have been skeptical of Booker for the support he has received from Wall Street donors. Booker will also oppose super PACS supporting his candidacy or others.
Reflecting its central place in Booker's story, Newark will be the headquarters for his campaign.

His campaign manager will be Addisu Demissie, a veteran of Booker's 2013 Senate race, who most recently ran Gavin Newsom's successful bid for California governor. Demissie also boasts experience on the ground in Iowa, having cut his teeth as a field organizer for John Kerry's 2004 caucus campaign, returning in the 2008 cycle on behalf of Hillary Clinton.

Other top campaign officials announced Friday include Jenna Lowenstein, who formerly ran Connecticut Democratic Sen. Chris Murphy's 2018 re-election campaign, as deputy campaign manager; Booker's Senate chief of staff Matt Klapper as senior adviser; and Modia Butler, a longtime Booker adviser dating back to his days in Newark, as senior strategist.

To steer his Iowa operation, Booker has already lined up a team of sought-after operatives: Michael Frosolone, who led Iowa Democrats' statehouse campaigns in 2018; Joe O'Hern, who ran the Democratic coordinated campaign in Ohio during the midterms and oversaw Martin O'Malley's 2016 caucus efforts; Haley Hager, most recently the Iowa director for Tom Steyer's NextGen group targeting young voters; and Tess Seger, outgoing communications director for the Iowa Democratic Party.

To steer his Iowa operation, Booker has already lined up a team of sought-after operatives: Michael Frosolone, who led Iowa Democrats' statehouse campaigns in 2018; Joe O'Hern, who ran the Democratic coordinated campaign in Ohio during the midterms and oversaw Martin O'Malley's 2016 caucus efforts; Haley Hager, most recently the Iowa director for Tom Steyer's NextGen group targeting young voters; and Tess Seger, outgoing communications director for the Iowa Democratic Party.

As a talented and ambitious black politician, Booker has elicited predictable comparisons to former President Barack Obama, whom he endorsed during the 2008 primary and campaigned for in 2012.

Booker has acknowledged the trope and jokes about it, but he doesn't neatly fit the mold. Whereas Obama often was guarded and serious, Booker is an extrovert whose unbridled enthusiasm and brimming energy can seem almost comical.

In some ways, Booker is a political heir to former President Jimmy Carter, who in the aftermath of the Nixon administration pledged a government "as good and honest and decent and compassionate and filled with love as are the American people." Booker recently described Carter as a "moral (giant) in America" and a model for "what I want my message to be in leadership." Carter, for his part, had urged Booker to run for president.
[/spoiler]

Unlike the mid terms where the congressional candidates ran based on thier district and largly stayed free of contentious issues the Presidential candidates in the very early going have felt the need to emphasize identity politics and at least play with socialist ideas such as medicare for all and Green New Deal. At some point they are going to have to answer questions about very late term abortions and impeachment. While America is a pro choice country I do not think most favor “up to birth” abortions.

This begs the question although believed to a shrinking despised minority in the Democratic party can a “centrist” candidate such as Mike Bloomberg or Hillary win the nomination by default because the “progressive” vote is split multiple ways?


I think the less progressive candidates will definitely splinter the real progressive votes but I feel like a progressive will still get overwhelming support. I doubt a centrist by the way of Hillary or Bloomberg could win the primary, I have yet to hear any Dems pander for them in any way. I'm not sure how you get 'identity politics' from socialist ideas but sure, every Dem platform will include 'identity' 'social' ideals sought from their constituents


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Kraichgauer
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01 Feb 2019, 5:06 pm

Magna wrote:
Kraichgauer wrote:
Magna wrote:
Cory Booker is in. I've had a theory for many years that for some reason people seem like they won't vote for a bald man for president. Basing a vote in part or even subconsciously on such a thing makes no sense, but I've always wondered if there's something to that.


What do you mean? Eisenhower was bald.


I thought of him. He's one of the only exceptions. It's just a theory...


John Quincy Adams, a balding man, was also brought up already.


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cemil
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06 Feb 2019, 12:53 am

#ReimagineUS



cemil
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06 Feb 2019, 1:10 am

cemil wrote:
#ReimagineUS



A jewish boy from a low-income household working his way to the top through hardwork and entrepreneurship and produces goods and makes wealth best represents american spirit .. free-market capitalism gives everyone a chance.

Democrats is such that , women or blacks always find themselves having a hard time to start up, so they want to play a safer route understandably.. Identity politics paired up with an absolute unassailable moral pedastal you cant even attack all the foolish diggressive policies anymore. (say the absolute disastrous low standard k12 public education system .. where did the uneducation of rural poor whites come from afterall ? and how the non-token blacks and browns cope with a "nerdier" digital work future? )



cemil
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06 Feb 2019, 1:33 am

Its even better to bring trade school back.. an advanced version of trade school with some liberal arts thrown in and give enough space to other alternatives other job fields etc..