Satellite data shows up climate forecasts

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08 May 2024, 6:04 pm

"Scientists sound alarm as growing threat looms over coastal states: 'We are preparing for the wrong disaster'"

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A detailed report by The Washington Post revealed that coastal communities across eight states in the U.S. are facing "one of the most rapid sea level surges on Earth." Since 2010, satellite data shows that the Gulf of Mexico has experienced twice the global average rate of rising sea levels, with more than a dozen tide gauges spanning from Texas to North Carolina registering sea levels that are at least six inches higher than they were 14 years ago.

While many understandably assume that extreme weather events like hurricanes are the source of these changes, experts revealed that rising water levels face a "newer, more insidious challenge" of accumulation caused by smaller-scale weather events.

"To me, here's the story: We are preparing for the wrong disaster almost everywhere," said Rob Young, a professor at Western Carolina University and director of the Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines. "These smaller changes will be a greater threat over time than the next hurricane, no question about it."

Charleston, South Carolina recorded its fourth-highest water level since measurements began in 1899, with the city's average rising by seven inches since 2010. Jacksonville, Florida has seen an increase of six inches during that period, but Galveston, Texas experienced a whopping eight-inch increase in 14 years.


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16 May 2024, 6:47 pm

"Ancient trees unlock an alarming new insight into our warming world"

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Last summer, marked by deadly extreme heat and devastating wildfires, was the warmest in at least 2,000 years, according to new research, which analyzed weather data and tree rings to reconstruct a detailed picture of the past.

The findings offer a stark insight into the “unparalleled” warming the world is experiencing today thanks to humans burning vast amounts of planet-heating fossil fuels, according to the authors of the study published Tuesday in the Journal Nature. And it’s an alarming signal as some scientists warn 2024 is on track to be even hotter still.

Global warming is currently tracked by comparing temperatures to the “pre-industrial era,” before humans started burning large amounts of fossil fuels, widely defined as the period between 1850 to 1900. Under the Paris Agreement in 2015, countries agreed to restrict global warming to 2 degrees above pre-industrial levels.

Last summer, the world temporarily breached this threshold, according to the report. Using data taken from temperature instruments during this period, the scientists found the Northern Hemisphere summer in 2023 was 2.07 degrees Celsius warmer than the pre-industrial period.

But observational data from this period is sparse, uncertain and skews warmer. So, for a fuller picture of how the climate varied naturally before the start of the pre-industrial era, the study authors looked much further into the past.

To do this, they used detailed sets of tree ring records from thousands of trees across nine regions of the Northern Hemisphere, including North America and Scandinavia, but excluding the Tropics which lack good tree data.

Trees act as time capsules. The patterns of their rings – affected by sunlight, rainfall and temperature – provide a climate history for each year of their lives, going back centuries or even thousands of years.

This complex tree ring data allowed the scientists to reconstruct annual temperatures for Northern Hemisphere summers between the years 1 and 1849 and compare them to last summer’s temperatures.

They found the summer of 2023 was warmer than any other summer during this period.

It was at least 0.5 degrees Celsius warmer than the warmest summer during this period, the year 246 – when the Roman Empire still ruled over Europe and the Mayan Civilization dominated Central America.

At the other end of the scale, last summer was nearly 4 degrees Celsius warmer than the coldest summer the study identified, the year 536 – when a volcanic eruption pumped out vast amounts of planet-cooling gases.

Using this 2,000-year data set, they calculated that the summer of 2023 was 2.2 degrees Celsius hotter than the long-term pre-industrial average, before robust networks of instruments could measure the weather.

The study follows a report published in November, which found humanity lived through the hottest 12-month period in at least 125,000 years. The study, and others like it, rely on data extracted from other proxies, such as ice cores and coral reefs, which don’t give the same detailed yearly evidence as tree rings.


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29 May 2024, 2:05 pm

"Indian capital of Delhi breaks all-time heat record, as authorities impose water rationing"

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India’s capital territory of Delhi sweltered to its highest-ever temperature of 49.9 degrees Celsius (121.8 degrees Fahrenheit) on Tuesday, as an oppressive heat wave forced authorities to impose water rationing.

The Indian Meteorological Department (IMD) said the new record was measured in the suburb of Mungeshpur, surpassing Delhi’s previous high of 49.2 degrees Celsius (120.5 degrees Fahrenheit), observed in May 2022.

Some areas of Delhi are struggling to access water, while others have none at all, said Atishi Marlena Singh, a senior minister in the Delhi government, at a news conference.

Areas that normally receive water supplies twice a day will now have their delivery cut to once a day to redirect resources to areas that have had little to no supply at all, Singh said.

The water shortages were caused by the “acute heatwave,” as well as a lack of water deliveries from the northern state of Haryana to Delhi, which are not being made as usual, Singh said.
It sounds absolutely miserable.



"Rivers in Alaska are turning orange. The reason surprised even scientists"
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Rivers and streams in Alaska are changing color – from a clean, clear blue to a rusty orange – because of the toxic metals released by thawing permafrost, according to a new study.

The finding surprised researchers from the National Park Service, the University of California at Davis and the US Geological Survey, who conducted tests at 75 locations in the waterways of Alaska’s Brooks Range. The rivers and streams in the range appeared to rust and became cloudy and orange over the past five to 10 years, according to the study published in the journal Communications: Earth & Environment.

The discoloration and cloudiness are being caused by metals such as iron, zinc, copper, nickel and lead, the researchers found – some of which are toxic to the river and stream ecosystems – as permafrost thaws and exposes the waterways to minerals locked away underground for thousands of years.

“We’re used to seeing this in parts of California, parts of Appalachia where we have mining history. This is a classic process that happens in rivers here in the continental US that have been impacted for over 100 years since some of the mining rushes in the 1850s,” said Brett Poulin, a co-author of the study and a professor of environmental toxicology at UC Davis.

“But it’s very startling to see it when you’re on some of the most remote wilderness and you’re far from a mine source.”

Arctic soils naturally contain organic carbon, nutrients and metals, such as mercury, within their permafrost, the study says. High temperatures have caused these minerals and the water sources around them to meet as permafrost melts.

The Arctic is warming four times faster than the rest of the world, studies have shown.

“What we believe we’re seeing is this thawing of soil that’s happening faster there than it would happen elsewhere,” said Poulin. “It’s really an unexpected consequence of climate change.”


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29 May 2024, 4:09 pm

Image

https://showyourstripes.info/


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30 May 2024, 3:29 pm

Cornflake wrote:
:scratch: Things were going OK from when I was born 'til I started working for a living...maybe me being retired now will help?


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30 May 2024, 3:40 pm

:lol:

It's a bit of a scary trend, isn't it?


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31 May 2024, 6:58 pm

"Animals collapse, water shortages bite amid India's searing heat"

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Animals collapsed, people jumped on water tankers with buckets amid shortages and government employees changed their work hours as blistering summer heat kept its grip on north India on Thursday.

Although Thursday's readings were marginally lower in Delhi than the previous day when one area recorded an all-time high of 52.9 degree Celsius (127.22 Fahrenheit), the region still saw temperatures touching 47 C (116.6 F).

Delhi, which has a population of 20 million, recorded its first heat-related death on Wednesday, with a 40-year old labourer dying of heatstroke, local media reported. Authorities said they are investigating if the 52.9 C reading in the Mungeshpur neighbourhood on Wednesday was caused by a sensor error at the local weather station.

Television images showed people chasing water tankers or climbing on top of them in parts of the city to fill containers amidst an acute water shortage that the government blames on low levels in the Yamuna River - Delhi's primary source of water.

Along the river's banks, women in shanties endured stifling conditions in their homes as their cooking stoves aggravated the sweltering weather.

"The heat is worse this year. We work like this everyday so we get into the habit," said Seema, 19, who cooks for her family twice a day.

In the neighbouring state of Uttar Pradesh, a policeman used CPR to revive a monkey that he said had fainted and fallen from a tree because of the heat, pumping its chest for 45 minutes, local media reported, and Delhi also saw cases of heatstroke among birds.




"Summer turns to winter: Hailstorm drops temperature from 90s to 50s"
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When a thunderstorm hits on a hot day, it can quickly reduce the temperature from 90 degrees Fahrenheit32°C to 7021°C, but to get much colder, you need hail -- and a lot of it.

Harry Weinman witnessed such a storm on Wednesday evening in Marathon, Texas. Weinman told AccuWeather that his car thermometer dropped from 9334°C to 5312°C degrees in a few minutes. Quarter-sized hail piled up several inches deep and stripped leaves from the trees, changing the landscape into what looked like a winter wonderland.

A rare weather condition called "hail fog" soon transpired, caused by the hail cooling the surrounding air to its dew point.

A nearby Ambient Weather station in the northeastern part of the town reported a drop from 84 F29°C to 62 F17°C -- 22 degrees -- in only five minutes. Thirty minutes later, that same station reported a chilly 55 degrees13°C. Other weather stations in the area showed similar drops in a short amount of time, some as much as 37 degrees lower than before the storm.


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31 May 2024, 7:39 pm

Hail accumulating is so bizarre. Where I live, it just doesn't do that because it never falls in that much quantity.

I saw a video of I think it was Mexico where they were shoveling hail. o.o


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31 May 2024, 7:40 pm

Harmonie wrote:
I saw a video of I think it was Mexico where they were shoveling hail. o.o


I saw that. It was like knee deep. 8O


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31 May 2024, 8:55 pm

"Texas town of Marathon deploys snow plows after 50-degree temperature swing and 2 feet of hail"

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As severe weather continued Thursday through the Great Plains, residents of a southwest Texas town reported a dramatic temperature drop on Wednesday and hail so deep they had to deploy snow plows to clear the streets.

The temperature in Marathon, Texas, fell more than 50 degrees on Wednesday afternoon as thermometers tumbled from around 105 degrees to the mid-50s in about an hour, Brian Curran, a meteorologist for the National Weather Service Midland, Texas, told ABC News.

Curran attributed the wild decline in temperature to the severe hail storm that hit Marathon.

"It was like an air conditioner," Curran said.

Brad Wilson, chief of the Marathon Fire Department, told ABC News that it was as if conditions turned from summer to winter in an hour.

"There was about two feet of hail on our main street right in the center of town. It looked like snow," Wilson said. "We went out there with a tape measure last night before the road crews came and plowed the roads."


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03 Jun 2024, 12:41 pm

"Unprecedented ocean temperatures make this hurricane season especially dangerous"

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The world's oceans have consistently been breaking daily heat records since early 2023, a yearlong fever that has climate scientists, coral reef experts and even hurricane forecasters concerned and dismayed.

In the main region of the Atlantic Ocean where hurricanes develop, water temperatures are "absolutely stunning," said Brian McNoldy, a senior research associate studying hurricanes at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School.

Hotter oceans and sea surface temperatures are like an octane boost for hurricane season, cranking up the fuel that drives the formation and intensity of hurricanes and tropical storms as they move over the ocean. Warmer-than-normal waters in the Atlantic, the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico play starring roles in all the seasonal outlooks for the Atlantic hurricane season beginning June 1.

"The whole tropical Atlantic is warmer than its ever been for this time of year," McNoldy told USA TODAY on Thursday. It's sitting at temperatures normally not seen until mid-August. And, "the Caribbean is going crazy."

The record daily average temperatures in the Atlantic north of the equator have been broken only by a four day period between April and May, when the average water temperature dropped to a tenth of a degree below a daily record set last year.

"And all of that's coming on the heels of 2023, which was warmer than it ever was for this time of year," McNoldy said. "Now we're breaking 2023 records. So, not great."


:roll: I guess we really are in hot water now!


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