Do 3.6 volt electric screwdrivers have a lot of torque?

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KevinLA
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27 Sep 2010, 8:08 pm

I am trying to put in a screw that will not budge. Will a 3.6 volt electric screwdriver be able to screw in something that will not go in or are they used to just to make screwing in screws faster. Does that make sense?

Does Black and Decker or Skil make better power tools?



Horus
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27 Sep 2010, 10:06 pm

KevinLA wrote:
I am trying to put in a screw that will not budge. Will a 3.6 volt electric screwdriver be able to screw in something that will not go in or are they used to just to make screwing in screws faster. Does that make sense?

Does Black and Decker or Skil make better power tools?


What kind of material are you trying to screw into and how long is the screw?

Take the screw out....back the screw out whether it's wood or metal. Then drill a pilot hole with a drill diameter SMALLER than screw diameter. If it's wood you're drilling into, you could run the screw back and forth on the top of a bar of soap. This will provide lubricant and should help the screw go in easier.


That screwdriver you're using isn't powerful at all....that's a low voltage/horsepower.

Black/Decker is the better of the two....but both aren't great quality. Skil is basically junk and black/decker isn't far behind. Craftsman isn't very good quality either. If you're really looking for top-of-the-line power tools....try Milwaukee or Dewalt. I use Dewalt drills during hurricane season to board up the windows and you can't really go wrong with those. These brands are what the professional electricians and so forth use, so they are very expensive of course. It doesn't sound like you really need costly professional-grade tools like this though. That said...i'd just go with black and decker if I were you.

Good luck!! !



KevinLA
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27 Sep 2010, 10:15 pm

Horus wrote:
KevinLA wrote:
I am trying to put in a screw that will not budge. Will a 3.6 volt electric screwdriver be able to screw in something that will not go in or are they used to just to make screwing in screws faster. Does that make sense?

Does Black and Decker or Skil make better power tools?


What kind of material are you trying to screw into and how long is the screw?

Take the screw out....back the screw out whether it's wood or metal. Then drill a pilot hole with a drill diameter SMALLER than screw diameter. If it's wood you're drilling into, you could run the screw back and forth on the top of a bar of soap. This will provide lubricant and should help the screw go in easier.


That screwdriver you're using isn't powerful at all....that's a low voltage/horsepower.

Black/Decker is the better of the two....but both aren't great quality. Skil is basically junk and black/decker isn't far behind. Craftsman isn't very good quality either. If you're really looking for top-of-the-line power tools....try Milwaukee or Dewalt. I use Dewalt drills during hurricane season to board up the windows and you can't really go wrong with those. These brands are what the professional electricians and so forth use, so they are very expensive of course. It doesn't sound like you really need costly professional-grade tools like this though. That said...i'd just go with black and decker if I were you.

Good luck!! !


I am trying to screw it into wood. It is a skinny one about two inches. I don't have a drill. I would hate to remove it. It is difficult to remove as well.

Will a 3.6 volt screwdriver most likely not help?

Good info. Milwaukee sells a 2.4 volt screwdriver. Will a 3.6 volt screwdriver always have more torque than a 2.4?



Horus
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27 Sep 2010, 10:59 pm

KevinLA wrote:
Horus wrote:
KevinLA wrote:
I am trying to put in a screw that will not budge. Will a 3.6 volt electric screwdriver be able to screw in something that will not go in or are they used to just to make screwing in screws faster. Does that make sense?

Does Black and Decker or Skil make better power tools?


What kind of material are you trying to screw into and how long is the screw?

Take the screw out....back the screw out whether it's wood or metal. Then drill a pilot hole with a drill diameter SMALLER than screw diameter. If it's wood you're drilling into, you could run the screw back and forth on the top of a bar of soap. This will provide lubricant and should help the screw go in easier.


That screwdriver you're using isn't powerful at all....that's a low voltage/horsepower.

Black/Decker is the better of the two....but both aren't great quality. Skil is basically junk and black/decker isn't far behind. Craftsman isn't very good quality either. If you're really looking for top-of-the-line power tools....try Milwaukee or Dewalt. I use Dewalt drills during hurricane season to board up the windows and you can't really go wrong with those. These brands are what the professional electricians and so forth use, so they are very expensive of course. It doesn't sound like you really need costly professional-grade tools like this though. That said...i'd just go with black and decker if I were you.

Good luck!! !


I am trying to screw it into wood. It is a skinny one about two inches. I don't have a drill. I would hate to remove it. It is difficult to remove as well.

Will a 3.6 volt screwdriver most likely not help?

Good info. Milwaukee sells a 2.4 volt screwdriver. Will a 3.6 volt screwdriver always have more torque than a 2.4?


It might help...but it sounds pretty weak to me and if it doesn't go in...you will most likely strip the head out if you keep trying.


It assuming it's a Philips screw correct?


Again.... if so and if it won't go in...you're going to strip the head. Once again, the thing to do is remove the screw if at all possible and run it back/forth across a bar of soap....or....a candle. Needless to say, without a drill...you're not going to able to drill the sort of pilot hole I mentioned in my last post. Can you access a drill somehow? Maybe borrow one from a neighbor, friend, or relative perhaps???


Do you know what kind of wood you're screwing into?


And yes....a 3.6 will probably always have more torque than a 2.4.


Hope this helps!! !



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28 Sep 2010, 12:59 am

As it's been said 3.6 volts ain't a lot. I personally hate cordless tools cause I can take a nice Ryobi 18V drill and drive some screws into some wood and the first time it gets stuck the battery is dead. Never had that problem with corded. I really honestly can't understand why my mom even bought a 8-9V drill because I know I wouldn't buy anything under 22V in this day and age.

Stick with Dewalt, remember that with volts more is always better, and if you're going to buy tools buy GOOD ones the first time around. I spent $20 on a cheap angle grinder broke it in a day, a year later I still have a Dewalt I bought used for $30.


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nthach
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28 Sep 2010, 2:44 am

Nope - if you need torque, you need something 14.4V or higher. But those are mucho expensive. I have a DeWalt 12V personally.



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28 Sep 2010, 9:22 am

Yeah, like mentioned by others best buy one with 12/14.4 Volt or more (under 10 Volt.. meh.. ) and maybe best/practical to buy one with 2 rechargeable batteries. About the brand and money wished to spend, it depends a bit how much you going to use the cordless drill. Most if not all are made in China and for some really goes, only the exterior and brand-name differ. Well, most won't last more than 5 years when used fairly often is my experience.


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kx250rider
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28 Sep 2010, 10:47 am

Not much torque at all. I'd have to know more about the project to give any ideas, but those little 2-cell (3.6v) screwdrivers are useless, in my opinion. I prefer regular (non-power) screwdrivers for most things, but I have a good DeWalt 18v hammerdrill/driver for bigger things like lumber/decking & drywall screws. Then you have to be concerned about overtightening or breaking the screw head off, etc. It's all about experience, and just "doing it" enough.

Most good quality battery-powered drill/drivers have a transmission with several gears, so you can pick high speed/lower torque, or vice-versa. My DeWalt also has a torque limiter, which you can set to stop putting force when the screw gets to a certain tightness.

Charles



nthach
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28 Sep 2010, 1:29 pm

Erminea wrote:
Most if not all are made in China and for some really goes, only the exterior and brand-name differ. Well, most won't last more than 5 years when used fairly often is my experience.

And there are only a handful of power tool OEMs as well. Here's a few off the top of my head -
Bosch: Bosch, Skil, RotoZip
Black & Decker/Stanley: Black & Decker, DeWalt, some Snap-On. The kicker here is that B&D is made in China while most DeWalt is made in Mexico.
Techtronic: Ryobi, Milwaukee
Emerson: Dremel, Ridgid

I believe Makita, Hitachi, and Hilti are their own companies still.



takemitsu
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28 Sep 2010, 11:59 pm

If your not going to be using your screwdriver a lot, just go with a cheap one. The higher quality brands are really for professionals that get heavy use out of their tools. I suggest higher V's though.


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