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grahambaster
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23 Dec 2018, 12:51 pm

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auntblabby
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24 Dec 2018, 12:02 am

the vast majority of amuuuricans cannot trill their R's to say a foreign word with R's in it. the uniquely hard flat American R is indelible.



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24 Dec 2018, 12:09 am

auntblabby wrote:
the vast majority of amuuuricans cannot trill their R's to say a foreign word with R's in it. the uniquely hard flat American R is indelible.

Japan sorta has a similar problem with words that have an "L" in them, as there is no Japanese equivalent to the English letter L and they often replace it with an R.



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24 Dec 2018, 12:24 am

TW1ZTY wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
the vast majority of amuuuricans cannot trill their R's to say a foreign word with R's in it. the uniquely hard flat American R is indelible.

Japan sorta has a similar problem with words that have an "L" in them, as there is no Japanese equivalent to the English letter L and they often replace it with an R.

from knowing my Japanese mother, I know that the average Japanese person cannot even "hear" or comprehend the sound of the western R. their "R" is really a combination of a very soft L and D mixed together.



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24 Dec 2018, 12:36 am

auntblabby wrote:
TW1ZTY wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
the vast majority of amuuuricans cannot trill their R's to say a foreign word with R's in it. the uniquely hard flat American R is indelible.

Japan sorta has a similar problem with words that have an "L" in them, as there is no Japanese equivalent to the English letter L and they often replace it with an R.

from knowing my Japanese mother, I know that the average Japanese person cannot even "hear" or comprehend the sound of the western R. their "R" is really a combination of a very soft L and D mixed together.


Personally I always thought the way they replaced L in non-Japanese words sounded like a conbination if W and R.

Like the name "Alice" often sounds like "Awricia".



auntblabby
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24 Dec 2018, 12:40 am

TW1ZTY wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
TW1ZTY wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
the vast majority of amuuuricans cannot trill their R's to say a foreign word with R's in it. the uniquely hard flat American R is indelible.

Japan sorta has a similar problem with words that have an "L" in them, as there is no Japanese equivalent to the English letter L and they often replace it with an R.

from knowing my Japanese mother, I know that the average Japanese person cannot even "hear" or comprehend the sound of the western R. their "R" is really a combination of a very soft L and D mixed together.


Personally I always thought the way they replaced L in non-Japanese words sounded like a conbination if W and R.

Like the name "Alice" often sounds like "Awricia".

Fdlied dlIce = fried rice.



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24 Dec 2018, 12:46 am

auntblabby wrote:
TW1ZTY wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
TW1ZTY wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
the vast majority of amuuuricans cannot trill their R's to say a foreign word with R's in it. the uniquely hard flat American R is indelible.

Japan sorta has a similar problem with words that have an "L" in them, as there is no Japanese equivalent to the English letter L and they often replace it with an R.

from knowing my Japanese mother, I know that the average Japanese person cannot even "hear" or comprehend the sound of the western R. their "R" is really a combination of a very soft L and D mixed together.


Personally I always thought the way they replaced L in non-Japanese words sounded like a conbination if W and R.

Like the name "Alice" often sounds like "Awricia".

Fdlied dlIce = fried rice.


I don't actually speak Japanese but I do know that when the Japanese version of foreign words are translated to English often times the L and R letter are used interchangeably.

Like the Chinese villain Lanhua in Mermaid Melody. Her name is sometimes mistranslated to "Ranfa" in subtitles, same with Alala becoming "Arara".



auntblabby
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24 Dec 2018, 12:48 am

TW1ZTY wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
TW1ZTY wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
TW1ZTY wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
the vast majority of amuuuricans cannot trill their R's to say a foreign word with R's in it. the uniquely hard flat American R is indelible.

Japan sorta has a similar problem with words that have an "L" in them, as there is no Japanese equivalent to the English letter L and they often replace it with an R.

from knowing my Japanese mother, I know that the average Japanese person cannot even "hear" or comprehend the sound of the western R. their "R" is really a combination of a very soft L and D mixed together.


Personally I always thought the way they replaced L in non-Japanese words sounded like a conbination if W and R.

Like the name "Alice" often sounds like "Awricia".

Fdlied dlIce = fried rice.


I don't actually speak Japanese but I do know that when the Japanese version of foreign words are translated to English often times the L and R letter are used interchangeably.

Like the Chinese villain Lanhua in Mermaid Melody. Her name is sometimes mistranslated to "Ranfa" in subtitles, same with Alala becoming "Arara".

what is really interesting, though- is Japan's pop singers tend to decorously trill their Rs in the continental style. ironic.



TW1ZTY
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24 Dec 2018, 12:53 am

auntblabby wrote:
TW1ZTY wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
TW1ZTY wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
TW1ZTY wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
the vast majority of amuuuricans cannot trill their R's to say a foreign word with R's in it. the uniquely hard flat American R is indelible.

Japan sorta has a similar problem with words that have an "L" in them, as there is no Japanese equivalent to the English letter L and they often replace it with an R.

from knowing my Japanese mother, I know that the average Japanese person cannot even "hear" or comprehend the sound of the western R. their "R" is really a combination of a very soft L and D mixed together.


Personally I always thought the way they replaced L in non-Japanese words sounded like a conbination if W and R.

Like the name "Alice" often sounds like "Awricia".

Fdlied dlIce = fried rice.


I don't actually speak Japanese but I do know that when the Japanese version of foreign words are translated to English often times the L and R letter are used interchangeably.

Like the Chinese villain Lanhua in Mermaid Melody. Her name is sometimes mistranslated to "Ranfa" in subtitles, same with Alala becoming "Arara".

what is really interesting, though- is Japan's pop singers tend to decorously trill their Rs in the continental style. ironic.


Yeah plus they randomly use English words in songs all the time. Some J-pop songs are even sung entirely in English (with some words used improperly I might add). What is up with that I wonder? :P

I guess some Japanese people are as fascinated with Western culture as some Americans are with Asian culture. 8)



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24 Dec 2018, 12:57 am

the Japanese love to pepper their talk and writing with loan words from English and French. in the technical field, especially, like of audio, for example.



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24 Dec 2018, 1:07 am

auntblabby wrote:
the Japanese love to pepper their talk and writing with loan words from English and French. in the technical field, especially, like of audio, for example.

Yeah but you also have young Japanese girls who like dressing like Victorian era dolls and you have a number of Japanese restaurant owners serving Western-style foods like pizza, burgers, and fish and chips. I think that shows an interest in the actual culture itself.

Kind of like America's new obsession with things like anime, manga, Japanese trading cards, martial arts, and Chinese & Japanese food. There's even non-Chinese women in the US who like wearing cheongsam dresses because they look fashionable.



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24 Dec 2018, 1:08 am

if I was more of a clotheshorse, i'd wear interesting foreign threads also. i'd love to be able to try more foreign foods but they are not available where I live. drat. :|



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24 Dec 2018, 1:12 am

auntblabby wrote:
if I was more of a clotheshorse, i'd wear interesting foreign threads also. i'd love to be able to try more foreign foods but they are not available where I live. drat. :|

If I was a girl I'd want to wear a cheongsam too. They're beautiful and classy-looking. :heart:

Ironically the Chinese food that Americans eat isn't what they actually eat over in China It's made to appeal more to American tastes. Still tastes good though. :lol:



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24 Dec 2018, 1:14 am

TW1ZTY wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
if I was more of a clotheshorse, i'd wear interesting foreign threads also. i'd love to be able to try more foreign foods but they are not available where I live. drat. :|

If I was a girl I'd want to wear a cheongsam too. They're beautiful and classy-looking. :heart:

Ironically the Chinese food that Americans eat isn't what they actually eat over in China It's made to appeal more to American tastes. Still tastes good though. :lol:

I like the Chinese form of Gyoza [Shumai?], they are steamed and full of spicy meat. place in Seattle called Uwajimayas serves 'em, such a [email protected]$$ed drive though. :|



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24 Dec 2018, 1:16 am

auntblabby wrote:
TW1ZTY wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
if I was more of a clotheshorse, i'd wear interesting foreign threads also. i'd love to be able to try more foreign foods but they are not available where I live. drat. :|

If I was a girl I'd want to wear a cheongsam too. They're beautiful and classy-looking. :heart:

Ironically the Chinese food that Americans eat isn't what they actually eat over in China It's made to appeal more to American tastes. Still tastes good though. :lol:

I like the Chinese form of Gyoza [Shumai?], they are steamed and full of spicy meat. place in Seattle called Uwajimayas serves 'em, such a [email protected]$$ed drive though. :|


I like sesame street chicken best. Who would have thought Big Bird tasted so good? :D

I want to learn to cook Chinese food one day. Like the kind they serve in buffets. :chef: