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lostinparadise
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17 Feb 2010, 2:11 am

i was wondering what would be a good career for a woman with Asperger.i have read Temple Grandin's list of job for asperger and autism .but i think that gender identity has a lot to do with the suitability.so is personality.what are good jobs and careers and education to persue for a girl who is shy,introvert and quiet.also it would be helpful to know what you are doing as job or studying in which field?

Thank you



sinsboldly
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17 Feb 2010, 2:51 am

I have found I was very good at cooking, able to internally time things to all come out together, with a good palate . I also found, after I educated myself, I was good at research and detection. I currently am a insurance fraud investigator and am paid to figure out what is going on by hints and clues and half truths. My mind just slices through the he said, she said and who shot john and gets to the heart of the matter by synthesis.

your milage may vary. :D

Merle


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Marsian
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17 Feb 2010, 6:03 am

If only I knew the answer to that question! It probably depends from one person to the next because we have different strengths and weaknesses and different interests and different sensitivities. I've never had a job that I've liked and that's in over 20 jobs... Have been sacked a few times due to incompetence and have been rejected from literally 100s of jobs due to interviews or psychometric testing... Goodness only knows what Aspie females are good at?



yagottalaff63
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17 Feb 2010, 7:57 am

I think the job I'm in right now is probably the best job that I've had in over 10 years as far as job duties go. I'm a pricing analyst for a grocery company and it doesn't require much interaction with others, there are only two people in my department, and even though most people would consider it a tedious job (dealing with massive spreadsheets all day, every day), it suits me perfectly. I've only ever had two other jobs that I liked as well and they were very similar to this one. I just don't do well at all when dealing with the public and talking on the phone a lot is involved. The only thing I don't like about this job is the atmosphere. It's very cliquish (and it doesn't help that I'm perceived as "stuck-up" because I don't talk much.)



MissConstrue
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17 Feb 2010, 9:35 am

Working night shifts as a stocker.

There's not many people around to bug you.


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Marsian
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17 Feb 2010, 9:42 am

I used to work nights for about a year and couldn't adjust to it at all. It was definitely good that there weren't as many people around but it gave me really bad fatigue and depression and seemed to weaken my immunity and made me ill a lot. I don't think it's a good idea for most people, AS aside.



kate123A
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17 Feb 2010, 9:48 am

I liked my job working in archives it didn't pay well but I had a desk , respect, and I could do the job well and not have to interact with a lot of people. I usually worked alone in the basement but it suited me and there was a massive collection of science fiction books that I secretly sat and read.



starygrrl
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17 Feb 2010, 10:35 am

I am an archivist. I also worked as a research and policy analyst. I would recommend both jobs. I would also recommend being a technical services librarian (they work behind the scenes at a library and oversee functions such as updating subscriptions).

I have a Juris Doctor (law degree, however I never practiced), and will probably get my MLIS soon. Sorry to sound like a stereotypical shy girl, but being a librarian/archivist/researcher rocks.

I would not recommend running a non-profit.



IslandAspie
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17 Feb 2010, 12:17 pm

I drove the taxi on our little island here a few summers ago. It was the most tolerable job I've had. I can fake social interaction long enough to collect a fare and a good tip, and sometimes I didn't even have to talk to my patrons (if they were not talkers). Since I was considered and independent contractor, I had full discretion as to whom I waited on and whom I did not. If people gave me too much attitude, I simply kicked them out of my taxi (I only had to do this a couple of times - both times it was MEN harassing me), or if they were rude on the phone, I just wouldn't serve them, period. Walking is good exercise, after all, and most people need the exercise these days. :wink:

I have never had another job that allowed me to exercise that kind of control over my environment and the people in it.

I've taught myself how to perform a couple of different kinds of public records research online. I wanted to track down someone in my family whom I hadn't seen in 20 years to send them a letter, so I figured it out and found a copy of the deed to her home with address, signatures, dates and all. I also was able to turn in someone who was on the run from the law for over 30 years, providing the authorities with supporting documentation I found using these methods. I have found I quite enjoy this kind of research. I am not sure I have the follow-through to get a private investigator's license, but the thought has been rolling around in my brain for a few years now.

In the mean time, I will probably go and get a traffic control flagger certification card here in Washington state so I can be the girl who makes almost $20/hour just to stand there holding a sign telling the traffic what to do. Boring, but easy work and not too much of the kind of interaction that should be a problem for me. Oh, and I kind of like the little radios they get to use :wink:


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Gremmie
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17 Feb 2010, 1:15 pm

I'm a phd student (which I know might not technically be seen as a job but it feels like one with the regular hours and the stipend I get paid, also you can possibly go from that into a postdoc job and maybe even into actual academia). You need a degree for it and it might not be for everyone, but most days I get to sit about in my lab, play my music and run experiments. Occasionally I discuss my project with my supervisor or say hello to people in the corridor. Some networking is needed but I think academics are generally more lenient of quirkiness so long as you know your subject.



alana
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17 Feb 2010, 7:52 pm

MissConstrue wrote:
Working night shifts as a stocker.

There's not many people around to bug you.


I love jobs like that. I can't do third shift because it makes me into the living dead but I have worked 2nd shift or very early morning (3 am to 1 or 2) when I was a baker most of my life. I really don't like the normal 8 to 5 and everything that goes along with it.



mysassyself
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19 Feb 2010, 4:09 am

Gremmie wrote:
I'm a phd student (which I know might not technically be seen as a job but it feels like one with the regular hours and the stipend I get paid, also you can possibly go from that into a postdoc job and maybe even into actual academia). You need a degree for it and it might not be for everyone, but most days I get to sit about in my lab, play my music and run experiments. Occasionally I discuss my project with my supervisor or say hello to people in the corridor. Some networking is needed but I think academics are generally more lenient of quirkiness so long as you know your subject.


That's really cool. I'm glad you're doing that, Gremmie. I started my degree when I was 17 and never finished. Now, I'm a little older and going back to it this year. I can't think of anything better than working in a lab, either.

i've done receptionist/bookkeeper type work. I was great at it, but it drains me so much. I need solitude, where I don't have to spend energy 'appearing normal' or being 'afraid to be intelligent' to think well. :D

I'm now deciding whether to study toward engineering or straight science, or animal and veterinary bioscience ..


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MELODY-S
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21 Feb 2010, 11:45 am

I have been very happy with my career in the computer industry. I started off as a software developer, which was great when I could only manage minimal social interaction. Later, when I decided to work on my social/communication skills, I switched over to a business/project management role.

The workplaces I have been in tend to be more men than women, reward performance more than politics, and is generally aspie friendly. It doesn't hurt that computers are one of my special interests. :D



RightGalaxy
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23 Feb 2010, 12:07 pm

Depends on your level of education.
Tech jobs is one example but you need training
Mainly jobs that do predominately one or just a few things with little variation to where you become VERY proficient at it after a short time. Then, you'll be ready to learn a bit more so you won't be bored.
I have an aspie friend who does an excellent job as a mammography tech. She received two years of hospital based training. She takes mammograms all day long... it has become her savant. She tried nursing but it was too much to remember...too diversified....too many different treatments and too social. As a tech, she must take accurate photos in order to find breast cancer...that's it. But lives are dependent on her skill. She simply follows procedure and rules...very robotic. But she's happy and makes good money. She doesn't have to do much paperwork because it is done for the patients at registration. She just has to keep records all together and properly labeled. All she has to concern herself with is the taking the photos properly. This keeps her focused. Doctors don't like retakes and it's not so good for the patient either. Now, she's learning how to do spot compressions as well as general mammograms. Spot compressions are targeted photos taken of particularly suspicious areas. She's learning on the job...no more classes. NT"S get bored after about five years. A logical aspie stays "honed" and alert and does the job at maximum proficiency...thus saving lives right up until they retire.



Brennan
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10 Mar 2010, 12:34 am

I work in IT which tends to be full of Aspies and fellow geeks.
Unfortunately, I am more on the tech support/customer support side of it than programming, so I am stuck out with the sales staff rather than with the programmers. So I'm around people who challenge me.
But the IT industry itself is basically Aspie heaven.



eb31
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13 Mar 2010, 2:46 pm

I have two part time jobs. One is delivering a paper route, which I enjoy. The other I won't mention for privacy, but I force myself to do it for the benefits I receive from working there.