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Tiffinity
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11 Mar 2011, 10:46 pm

I've read that it's possible to tell if someone is an Aspie by their posture. I don't understand what type of different posture someone with AS would have to anyone else. Does anyone know the answer to this or what is meant by it?

Thanks,

Tiffinity. :?


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anbuend
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11 Mar 2011, 11:01 pm

One possible posture of many:

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LPmFzPGJFDU[/youtube]

(Created at one point to illustrate how my posture sets me apart from others, at least when I have that particular posture, which isn't always.)

Anyway, motor differences exist (not always in coordination, sometimes in more complex movement-related skills that most people don't even understand as "motor skills", such that a person can be highly coordinated and yet have severe motor issues) in most autistic people to some degree or another. So do sensory differences. Either of these, or both at once, can affect posture.


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aghogday
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11 Mar 2011, 11:43 pm

anbuend wrote:
One possible posture of many:

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LPmFzPGJFDU[/youtube]

(Created at one point to illustrate how my posture sets me apart from others, at least when I have that particular posture, which isn't always.)

Anyway, motor differences exist (not always in coordination, sometimes in more complex movement-related skills that most people don't even understand as "motor skills", such that a person can be highly coordinated and yet have severe motor issues) in most autistic people to some degree or another. So do sensory differences. Either of these, or both at once, can affect posture.


I watched some of your other videos; you are an amazing person. Some here may never experience Autism close to the way that you do. There is so much value in the awareness and understanding of the experience of your world.

Most people don't understand that poor motor skills and can result in one persons difficulty in writing legibly; but at the same time they can be coordinated enough to type eighty words per minute. Typing requires almost the same movement each time while the ability to write requires fine movements that are much more complex than typing.

I can print legibly if I picture each letter in my mind and use it as a guide for my hand. Without an example in my mind the result is pretty much chaos, but I can interpret it for myself. I can also copy another persons handwriting in an uncanny way, but it takes an extreme level of concentration.

My wife gave me feedback on correcting my posture when I walked. I always felt more comfortable walking along side another human to use as an example. Kind of the same feeling as trying to print legibly.



Titangeek
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12 Mar 2011, 12:11 am

My posture is related to my mood, the poorer my mood the more hunched over i get, when i am in a good mood for a long period of time i can have near perfect posture.


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Tiffinity
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12 Mar 2011, 12:15 am

anbuend wrote:
One possible posture of many:

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LPmFzPGJFDU[/youtube]

(Created at one point to illustrate how my posture sets me apart from others, at least when I have that particular posture, which isn't always.)

Anyway, motor differences exist (not always in coordination, sometimes in more complex movement-related skills that most people don't even understand as "motor skills", such that a person can be highly coordinated and yet have severe motor issues) in most autistic people to some degree or another. So do sensory differences. Either of these, or both at once, can affect posture.


I found that so interesting. Wow! You are a really clever person and I felt very moved by watching your videos. So many people could learn a lot from you. Thanks for taking the time and effort to explain to me what I didn't understand, much appreciated. Also it's opened my eyes to the 'spectrum' part of Autism and its associated differences. It seems far more complicated than I realised when I asked that question. To me it appears to be one of those things that makes you realise that the more you find out the less you actually know.
Or maybe I'm just extra thick :lol:

I bet you get loads of positive comments on your post. :)

Thanks,

Tiffinity.


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