How do you feel about clothes shopping?

Page 3 of 8 [ 113 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 ... 8  Next


How do you feel about clothes shopping
Love 6%  6%  [ 9 ]
Like 5%  5%  [ 8 ]
Dont mind 15%  15%  [ 23 ]
Dislike 28%  28%  [ 42 ]
Hate 45%  45%  [ 68 ]
Total votes : 150

VMSmith
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 17 Apr 2011
Age: 30
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,735
Location: the old country

26 Mar 2012, 9:37 am

i hate shopping unless it is for mens clothing then it is sorta fun but also awkward because somebody will inevitably come up to me and ask if i am shopping for my boyfriend, dad, uncle, brother, etc no i just cross dress... i can never find anything cheap & good looking that fits. womens clothes are yuk these days. shoes are especially hard to find.



Pandora_Box
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Dec 2010
Age: 34
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,299

26 Mar 2012, 11:05 am

The experience is unpleasant. I said dislike. But it isn't as bad as some people here. It's just I have specifics of how I should have my shoes and specifics of how I should have my pants. And I'm short that's another thing. Most pair of pants are made for the average height guy. For me at 5'2" pants end up dragging on the floor. I hate how loose all my shirts are, even when wearing a small, but I don't like it to tight too. Clothes are a nightmare.



YellowBanana
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 14 Feb 2011
Age: 48
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,032
Location: mostly, in my head.

26 Mar 2012, 11:11 am

I hate hate hate clothes shopping.
There is nothing worse in terms of shopping.

Now I've got the point where I just wear the same thing most days - I have 3 t-shirts, 3 hoodies (one to wear, one for spare and one in the wash) and I usually wear jeans or loose (but not too loose) cotton trousers. I'm going to have to buy some new jeans soon and I'm not looking forward to it because the shop I got these ones in doesn't sell them any more which means I can't just go buy the same thing.


_________________
Female. Dx ASD in 2011 @ Age 38. Also Dx BPD


lostmyself
Deinonychus
Deinonychus

User avatar

Joined: 4 Dec 2011
Age: 36
Gender: Female
Posts: 333

26 Mar 2012, 11:28 am

I have ADHD induced anxiety which flares up while shopping so I go from shop to shop without buying anything and then get depressed for not buying what I need. Internet shopping is hard too because I can't settle on what to buy.



kx250rider
Supporting Member
Supporting Member

User avatar

Joined: 15 May 2010
Age: 54
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,140
Location: Dallas, TX & Somis, CA

26 Mar 2012, 11:35 am

I don't really like or dislike, and all I really have to go out and buy at a store is socks & underwear, and very seldom a formal shirt or suit. For jeans, T-shirts, and footwear, it's eBay and Amazon. My workboots, which I wear 99% of the time, are not available in stores anyway due to the size (15 wide). I'm really only picky about shoes and boots, whereas I understand many other Aspies are pickier than I am on other clothes. Levi's jeans and most any T-shirt is fine, if it fits right.

Charles



glider18
Supporting Member
Supporting Member

User avatar

Joined: 8 Nov 2008
Gender: Male
Posts: 8,031
Location: USA

26 Mar 2012, 11:39 am

Hate's a strong word, so I decided to say I dislike clothes shopping. I avoid shopping for clothes. My wife buys a lot of stuff for me off of the internet, so I don't have to shop too much.


_________________
"My journey has just begun."


howzat
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Aug 2007
Age: 35
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,802
Location: Hornsey North London

26 Mar 2012, 3:27 pm

I don't particularly like shopping for clothes as i find it stressful also the bright lights and the s**t music they play as well even the clothes they sell are scruffy with stupid slogans.



WildMan
Sea Gull
Sea Gull

User avatar

Joined: 4 Nov 2006
Gender: Male
Posts: 241
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada

26 Mar 2012, 3:47 pm

Living in Italy, you do not have the option of neglecting your clothes. In America, only fancy people take fashion seriously. In Italy, frickin' EVERYBODY does. I mean, it's not like they obsess over it. In fact, they don't have to, because it comes to them naturally and effortlessly. They don't even have to try. It takes serious effort to keep up with basic expectations so as not look like a complete slob. Even the crusty street punk kids (called "punka bestia" here because of their dogs) here are stylish; everything fits perfectly and is color coordinated, hats and belts and chains are positioned at perfectly rakish angles, hair is chopped just so.

And if you go to a wedding or somebody's graduation or anything that's even halfway formal, a proper suit is absolutely mandatory. And if you go about it like the typical schlubby American, with the overly baggy dress shirt, crappy shoes, and an imperfectly fitted suit, you will stand out like a sore thumb.

If you think that's intimidating, it's even worse in France. At least the Italians tend to play it safe, with dark monochromes and minimalist ties. The French, on the other hand, coordinate their materials, patterns, and colors to a degree that is breathtaking, which means that there is far more room for error. While many fail at it, it is possible to mimic the Italians to at least a passable degree, and I managed to do so by turning my Aspergian obsessive focus onto the task. Do not even attempt it with the French.



Cogs
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Feb 2012
Age: 29
Gender: Male
Posts: 852

26 Mar 2012, 3:58 pm

WildMan wrote:
Living in Italy, you do not have the option of neglecting your clothes. In America, only fancy people take fashion seriously. In Italy, frickin' EVERYBODY does. I mean, it's not like they obsess over it. In fact, they don't have to, because it comes to them naturally and effortlessly. They don't even have to try. It takes serious effort to keep up with basic expectations so as not look like a complete slob. Even the crusty street punk kids (called "punka bestia" here because of their dogs) here are stylish; everything fits perfectly and is color coordinated, hats and belts and chains are positioned at perfectly rakish angles, hair is chopped just so.

And if you go to a wedding or somebody's graduation or anything that's even halfway formal, a proper suit is absolutely mandatory. And if you go about it like the typical schlubby American, with the overly baggy dress shirt, crappy shoes, and an imperfectly fitted suit, you will stand out like a sore thumb.

If you think that's intimidating, it's even worse in France. At least the Italians tend to play it safe, with dark monochromes and minimalist ties. The French, on the other hand, coordinate their materials, patterns, and colors to a degree that is breathtaking, which means that there is far more room for error. While many fail at it, it is possible to mimic the Italians to at least a passable degree, and I managed to do so by turning my Aspergian obsessive focus onto the task. Do not even attempt it with the French.

Wow, are the styles clear - is it easy to determine what the expectations are?



hanyo
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 30 Sep 2011
Age: 46
Gender: Female
Posts: 4,302

26 Mar 2012, 4:10 pm

I don't really like trying on clothes. I'm shy about asking to use the dressing room if it's a place where you have to ask, I'm worried that security is spying on me with a camera to make sure I don't shoplift, and I don't wear underwear unless I'm wearing a pad so I have to plan it in advance if I want to try pants on so I don't get other people's germs or leave my own germs in clothes I'm trying on.

Also I feel kind of funny about the idea of trying on men's clothes in a place where I have to ask. I buy shirts without trying them on because I like loose shirts and generaly buy the largest size available. You can't really do that with most pants. I saw some nice knee length men's shorts recently that I liked the looks of and maybe I will try them on the next time I am at the mall. I'm not sure if I have the nerve to wear them with my hairy legs though.



Last edited by hanyo on 26 Mar 2012, 4:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.

paddy26
Toucan
Toucan

User avatar

Joined: 24 Apr 2009
Gender: Male
Posts: 277

26 Mar 2012, 4:39 pm

I guess I'm in the minority where I quite like clothes shopping. I do find it alot easier and cheaper to buy things online from sites like H&M and ASOS but don't mind going into town as long as I know what I'm getting and where I'm going.



WildMan
Sea Gull
Sea Gull

User avatar

Joined: 4 Nov 2006
Gender: Male
Posts: 241
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada

26 Mar 2012, 4:53 pm

Cogs wrote:
Wow, are the styles clear - is it easy to determine what the expectations are?


To be sure, I'm probably exaggerating. But it is true that the Italians and the French are the two best-dressed people in all of Europe, and probably all the world. With that said, here are things that I can tell you (most of which are not obvious to most Americans aside from fancy Manhattan people and the like):

1. Rule number one. Make sure it fits. Try on 12 pairs of jeans if you have to, and buy the pair that fits perfectly. They don't have to painfully compress your junk, but at the same time there should be no sag or bag at all. Form-fitting, but not form-crushing. Make sure everything is your exact size. It's not enough to know what number/size you are, you must always try things on! Always!! ! Eight pairs of jeans of the exact same brand and size can each fit you differently. Always remember this.

And if you buy a suit, for the love of God make sure you get it as precisely tailored as possible by an actual tailor. Don't buy American dress shirts either unless it says "athletic cut" or "slim fit" on the label. (Even if you're not slim.) Buy Italian dress shirts in Italy to be safe. The default American dress shirt looks like a plastic shopping bag to European eyes, and not just to the Italians. A dress shirt should be form fitting, even if you've got a big ol' gut and flabby arms (though in that case, skin tight wouldn't do).

2. Shoes. They will notice your shoes. American men are seen as having chunky shoes that look too big for their feet. Go for sleek and form-fitting instead. And don't wear crappy white sneakers. Nothing will mark you as an American tourist faster than a pair of crappy white sneakers. Combined with a baseball cap, a college football sweatshirt, and a fanny pack, and you'll be a living walking stereotype. And don't wear white socks!

As for dress shoes. They must be sleek. They must be form-fitting. Bulbous toes, chunky soles, cheap crappy leather = no no no!! ! When in doubt, go with black (unless you're wearing a brown suit).

3. Make sure your colors don't clash. Italians play it safe, whereas the French are more daring. In Italy, you just can't go wrong with a navy blue suit, a light blue dress shirt, and a subtly patterned dark blue tie (make sure it's proper silk!). That's the standard businessman/politician look in Italy. Pair that with black dress shoes, or tan (or light brown) dress shoes if you feel like it, and make sure it's all properly fitted, and you're in business.

As for going casual. You can brighten it up, but be careful. Today I bought a purple hoodie from H&M. (It's straight up bright purple, it's not faded or textured weird or anything, it's just like... purple!! !) I usually wear all black, and it went with the rest of my (black) outfit perfectly while complimenting my skin tone (I pass as southern Italian here; I live in the north). I love it! I'm so glad I got it. (I tried it on to make sure it fit perfectly before buying it.) Also, in the colder months Italians of either gender are fond of wearing bright red coats/jackets on top of dark/black outfits. It's a bold look but you're still playing it safe; when they wear bright bold colors they tend to go with solids as opposed to patterns.

Learn those three rules and you'll go far.



Wobbuffet
Sea Gull
Sea Gull

User avatar

Joined: 18 May 2010
Gender: Male
Posts: 245

26 Mar 2012, 4:58 pm

I like buying t-shirts...a lot of people compliment me on the t-shirts I wear, and a lot of them are good for people to start conversations - so I like looking for interesting ones.

I hate looking for and trying on new shoes though...I don't really like shopping for jeans, coats or anything else either.



TheHouseholdCat
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 29 Feb 2012
Age: 33
Gender: Female
Posts: 667
Location: Berlin, Germany

26 Mar 2012, 5:13 pm

My main problem with clothes shopping is that every piece of clothing needs to have a certain value for myself as a person. Which is not the way you're "supposed" to buy clothes. Of course, it's not very practical because there'll always be a time when you need something new.


_________________
EXPANDED CIRCLE OF FIFTHS

"It's how they see things. It's a way of bringing class to an environment, and I say that pejoratively because, obviously, good music is good music however it's created, however it's motivated." - Thomas Newman


Cogs
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Feb 2012
Age: 29
Gender: Male
Posts: 852

26 Mar 2012, 6:06 pm

WildMan wrote:
Cogs wrote:
Wow, are the styles clear - is it easy to determine what the expectations are?


To be sure, I'm probably exaggerating. But it is true that the Italians and the French are the two best-dressed people in all of Europe, and probably all the world. With that said, here are things that I can tell you (most of which are not obvious to most Americans aside from fancy Manhattan people and the like):

1. Rule number one. Make sure it fits. Try on 12 pairs of jeans if you have to, and buy the pair that fits perfectly. They don't have to painfully compress your junk, but at the same time there should be no sag or bag at all. Form-fitting, but not form-crushing. Make sure everything is your exact size. It's not enough to know what number/size you are, you must always try things on! Always!! ! Eight pairs of jeans of the exact same brand and size can each fit you differently. Always remember this.

And if you buy a suit, for the love of God make sure you get it as precisely tailored as possible by an actual tailor. Don't buy American dress shirts either unless it says "athletic cut" or "slim fit" on the label. (Even if you're not slim.) Buy Italian dress shirts in Italy to be safe. The default American dress shirt looks like a plastic shopping bag to European eyes, and not just to the Italians. A dress shirt should be form fitting, even if you've got a big ol' gut and flabby arms (though in that case, skin tight wouldn't do).

2. Shoes. They will notice your shoes. American men are seen as having chunky shoes that look too big for their feet. Go for sleek and form-fitting instead. And don't wear crappy white sneakers. Nothing will mark you as an American tourist faster than a pair of crappy white sneakers. Combined with a baseball cap, a college football sweatshirt, and a fanny pack, and you'll be a living walking stereotype. And don't wear white socks!

As for dress shoes. They must be sleek. They must be form-fitting. Bulbous toes, chunky soles, cheap crappy leather = no no no!! ! When in doubt, go with black (unless you're wearing a brown suit).

3. Make sure your colors don't clash. Italians play it safe, whereas the French are more daring. In Italy, you just can't go wrong with a navy blue suit, a light blue dress shirt, and a subtly patterned dark blue tie (make sure it's proper silk!). That's the standard businessman/politician look in Italy. Pair that with black dress shoes, or tan (or light brown) dress shoes if you feel like it, and make sure it's all properly fitted, and you're in business.

As for going casual. You can brighten it up, but be careful. Today I bought a purple hoodie from H&M. (It's straight up bright purple, it's not faded or textured weird or anything, it's just like... purple!! !) I usually wear all black, and it went with the rest of my (black) outfit perfectly while complimenting my skin tone (I pass as southern Italian here; I live in the north). I love it! I'm so glad I got it. (I tried it on to make sure it fit perfectly before buying it.) Also, in the colder months Italians of either gender are fond of wearing bright red coats/jackets on top of dark/black outfits. It's a bold look but you're still playing it safe; when they wear bright bold colors they tend to go with solids as opposed to patterns.

Learn those three rules and you'll go far.


Thanks for the reply :D



KaleyS
Hummingbird
Hummingbird

Joined: 24 Jun 2019
Age: 33
Gender: Female
Posts: 18
Location: Seattle, USA

10 Aug 2019, 7:17 am

I prefer buying clothes online. I chose several brands that I like most of all, so I just monitor the sites from time to time and buy stuff there. Also I use (this brand is in great demand and it is not easy to buy everything I want on its website). What brand do you like most of all?



Last edited by B19 on 14 Nov 2019, 3:09 am, edited 1 time in total.: spammer