How do you feel about clothes shopping?

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How do you feel about clothes shopping
Love 6%  6%  [ 9 ]
Like 5%  5%  [ 8 ]
Dont mind 15%  15%  [ 23 ]
Dislike 28%  28%  [ 42 ]
Hate 45%  45%  [ 68 ]
Total votes : 150

Mountain Goat
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12 Aug 2019, 2:57 pm

I avoid and if I do buy something, it is as plain as possible (For example Green or blue single colour items) bought with comfort in mind or for cycling in mind...

Clothes shopping for me is more then a disslike but not quite a hate. I avoid it if I can. I put disslike.


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ToughDiamond
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12 Aug 2019, 11:54 pm

I like the idea of acquiring clothes I like the look of when I'm wearing them, but I don't like the process of searching for them in shops. I don't like having to dodge round other people. Much of the time I come away empty-handed because they don't have much that I expect I'll like, and I don't like using public changing rooms so if I don't use them it's going to be a risk if I buy anything. So naturally I don't like taking pains with something that's unlikely to have a reward at the end of it. With shirts and trousers I've bought nothing but second hand, they're often good quality and cheap enough to just take the risk and get them, though it takes a few trips round the charity stores before something promising turns up. I don't mind second-hand shops as much. They seem more homely and less corporate, and they've usually got a few other things apart from clothes for me to consider owning. And refusing to buy new clothes allows me to feel smug about not damaging the planet or exploiting cheap labour so much - new cotton clothes are pretty bad ecologically and a lot of them are cranked out in sweatshops that underpay their workers and treat them like dirt.

Like I say, I like the idea of getting clothes I like myself in, and if it were a trivial task then I'd probably get heavily into expressing my mood, personality and attitude through clothes, but as it's not so easy to achieve that without a very patient bespoke tailor and a willingness to pay out a lot of money, I settle for clothes that don't seem to look too bad. Judging by how I feel about the way most people dress (most modern clothes look silly to me), that's not so hard to achieve.



auntblabby
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13 Aug 2019, 12:07 am

99% of the clothing i try on, does not fit.



traven
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13 Aug 2019, 1:00 am

feel??
inadequate, ain't got the money, and shops don"t have the stuff
idk what's going on, oh i do know
hedgefunds and stock-insurance
(overstock, naked short selling, etc i see big stocks are sold to ngo's as well)

when your regular shops try to be lowbudget shops as well,
when profit isn't even the goal,
when salesstaff treats clients as unwelcome or mental-cases,
well, as the 2008 crisis was a worldwide bankers-coup (d'état), they're still at the sqeezing bit



Sam64
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13 Aug 2019, 4:40 am

HATE. The combination of an enormous amount of choices, the sensory issues (bright lights, music, crowds etc) and confusing store layouts that make NO sense make me feel like my head's going to explode. It's one of the worst things for me.



auntblabby
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13 Aug 2019, 4:43 am

i almost never shop for clothing in a new store like a department store or such, i always go 2nd-hand at a place like Goodwill or such.



BTDT
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13 Aug 2019, 7:45 am

auntblabby wrote:
99% of the clothing i try on, does not fit.


I used to use a cloth tape measure to figure out what to try on. With experience you will find out the usual "pinch points" that make clothes to small.

If it is too big I can alter stuff. Sewing machines aren't all that expensive these days.



Donald Morton
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13 Aug 2019, 8:02 am

Shopping for clothes by myself before online offerings became commonplace was a nerve wracking experience for me. I hated it and got panicky usually rushing my search and not finding what I needed. Fortunately my clothing needs and wants are little more than the bare essentials easily found via the internet.


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ToughDiamond
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13 Aug 2019, 11:35 am

Donald Morton wrote:
Shopping for clothes by myself before online offerings became commonplace was a nerve wracking experience for me. I hated it and got panicky usually rushing my search and not finding what I needed.

I remember trying to buy trousers without assistance for the first time. Undiagnosed, I expected no problem. I walked into a fashionable clothes shop in the middle of town. There was this horrible muzak blaring out. I couldn't concentrate. I felt really self-conscious and somehow thought the assistants were watching and judging me. I knew this fashion thing could be very competitive and judgemental. I didn't dare ask for help in case I revealed my ignorance on the subject of trouser selection. After a few minutes I abandoned the mission. It was another world in that shop, one I'd never be able to fit into. After running away from it I seriously doubted that I'd be able to keep clothing myself when my existing clothes had worn out. Such a simple task - enter shop, find garments on racks, see if there's anything of a colour, shape and texture that will do, see if there's anything that's my size, if all those things prove favourable, buy garment. I couldn't understand why my performance had been so feeble. I didn't have particularly low general confidence, but I think I must have felt very inferior to those fashion types. Luckily that changed and these days I feel sorry for them.



Dear_one
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13 Aug 2019, 11:42 am

Expensive stores are not really entitled to any attitude. It is just part of the phoniness they cater to. My friend Debbie Mac saw the premier of Nova Scotia standing around in his boxers getting fitted for a suit while she was still finishing the store as a carpenter.



auntblabby
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14 Aug 2019, 5:58 am

BTDT wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
99% of the clothing i try on, does not fit.


I used to use a cloth tape measure to figure out what to try on. With experience you will find out the usual "pinch points" that make clothes to small. If it is too big I can alter stuff. Sewing machines aren't all that expensive these days.

my mom didn't have enough time to teach me how to sew.



BTDT
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14 Aug 2019, 7:14 am

There are plenty of online videos on how to sew.



auntblabby
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14 Aug 2019, 7:16 am

i need a complete beginner's AARP-edition sewing machine and a sewing for dummies textbook.



Borromeo
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14 Aug 2019, 7:35 am

Most good sewing machines can't be messed up by beginners. As far as a handbook, there is a lot to be learned from inspecting clothing and seeing how the cloth is put together.

No one ever taught me how to sew, Blabs, so I have had to go by the skin of my teeth. Fairly simple.

I mentioned owning an old Singer. Those are very simple if you can find one that works. Most of the stereotypical black cast-iron models can be repaired by a competent technician, and the parts are still manufactured so the local vacuum-cleaner store can likely help you.

The bad thing is they only are good for straight stitching and for whatever attachment you have on them. Straight stitching (lockstitch) works for most needs but you won't have a serger. So get used to using a needle & thread also.

Oh, and get an electric one. Seriously. They made hand-cranked ones for a time but I have both hands busy when I am sewing on my electric so there would be a conflict of interests were I stuck cranking it at the same time. Treadle machines are cool (and eco friendly) but they run on a leather drive belt so that might not work with your vegan lifestyle. (The early electrics used a rubber belt or a cloth V-belt on a pulley.)

If you got a modern machine, go whole hog & get the new Singer heavy duty. My mother has that one. It's a beast. Most new Singers are absolute junk, I'm sorry to say, but that particular model is still worth using.

It has ALL the stitches and no computers in it to go bad--it's all mechanical except a gear-driven electric motor embedded in the base. So no belt to go bad either, and no carbon brushes on the motor to maintain. Also, the foot-pedal is a little simpler than the early steel-and-Bakelite "motor controllers" so that's nice.


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auntblabby
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14 Aug 2019, 7:46 am

^^^you sure know your onions ;) [and sewing machines :wtg: ]



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14 Aug 2019, 9:10 am

My mother did not sew, but when I needed a custom bicycle bag, I borrowed a machine and stitched it up. A woman I knew couldn't believe it. Basic sewing is easy. Tailoring can be an art. I also knew a woman who always re-sewed the seams of any clothes she bought. I think she was fussy.