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franknfurter
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11 Feb 2013, 2:36 pm

I think i probably have it, but i dont really want to go to the doctors, im worried i will be seen as paranoid, self absorbed or a hyperchondriac, i feel kind of bad for thinking i have it because i am probably just self absorbed, some times i really feel i have it and others i think im just being stupid, cant make my mind up.



BuyerBeware
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11 Feb 2013, 2:42 pm

If you think you have it, there's a pretty good chance that you do.

Getting tested?? I don't know. How much trouble are you having coping in life, and with what??

They can't teach you how to be comfortable acting normal, or happy being an outcast. Believe me, I've tried.

If you've got basic nutrition and hygeine covered, there's not going to be much help with executive function in terms of organization and time management and memory that you can't get without discussing those problems and leaving AS the heck out of it.

What do you see the benefits as being??

Are the costs (in terms of insurance coverage, psychoemotional impact, stigma, all the ways a diagnosis can be used against you) worth the potential benefits?? Please be careful. If you think those costs aren't high, you're either in a Scandinavian liberal paradise or you may not have thought about it enough.


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franknfurter
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11 Feb 2013, 2:46 pm

BuyerBeware wrote:
If you think you have it, there's a pretty good chance that you do.

Getting tested?? I don't know. How much trouble are you having coping in life, and with what??

They can't teach you how to be comfortable acting normal, or happy being an outcast. Believe me, I've tried.

If you've got basic nutrition and hygeine covered, there's not going to be much help with executive function in terms of organization and time management and memory that you can't get without discussing those problems and leaving AS the heck out of it.

What do you see the benefits as being??

Are the costs (in terms of insurance coverage, psychoemotional impact, stigma, all the ways a diagnosis can be used against you) worth the potential benefits?? Please be careful. If you think those costs aren't high, you're either in a Scandinavian liberal paradise or you may not have thought about it enough.


insurence coverage, what does that involve exactly, im from the UK, does that make a difference. as for the benefits i suppose only for my peace of mind, as for how much my life is affected, i feel isolated a lot, but as you said there is not much help with that, i do have friends i just dont feel really connected, if that makes sense,
I also have mood issues that i would like a reason for, but i have to learn that not everything has a reason, that has been an ongoing problem with me, i like a reason for everything.



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11 Feb 2013, 3:12 pm

Insurance probably isn't as much of an issue for you. Here in the US, if I change providers (say I go to work and start carrying our insurance or DH gets a different job) they can refuse to cover any kind of treatment because I had the diagnosis before I had the policy. One of the perks of universal healthcare-- already having something "wrong" doesn't preclude you from getting help to pay for help.

I don't know a whole lot about the UK. I'm in Pennsylvania, USA. Here, the stigma is a major issue and becoming more of one. Offering AS as an explanation for something (an emotion, a behavior, a misunderstanding) is usually seen as making excuses or demanding special treatment, not as an explanation. In the last decade, it seems to have become a coin-toss as to whether you've going to encounter being treated as a complete invalid or an automatic psychopath the minute the word "Asperger" leaves your mouth.

Being in UK, diagnosis might present less of a hazard for you. Might be worth pursuing. Peace of mind is priceless-- in myexperience here in USA, diagnosis has cost me more peace of mind than it has brought. Might not be that way in UK-- it seems to be a bit closer to being a Scandinavian liberal paradise, and honestly "America the Land of the Free" is pretty damn barbaric in that respect.

The isolation issue I do not think anyone knows what to do other than try to make peace with it. I know people moving from one culture to another experience something similar. Only solution I know is seeking like minds-- but you are here so you are doing that. Diagnosis might or might not ease that.

What are the mood issues? There is potential help there. Depending on the issue.


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"Alas, our dried voices when we whisper together are quiet and meaningless, as wind in dry grass, or rats' feet over broken glass in our dry cellar." --TS Eliot, "The Hollow Men"


franknfurter
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11 Feb 2013, 3:22 pm

BuyerBeware wrote:
Insurance probably isn't as much of an issue for you. Here in the US, if I change providers (say I go to work and start carrying our insurance or DH gets a different job) they can refuse to cover any kind of treatment because I had the diagnosis before I had the policy. One of the perks of universal healthcare-- already having something "wrong" doesn't preclude you from getting help to pay for help.

I don't know a whole lot about the UK. I'm in Pennsylvania, USA. Here, the stigma is a major issue and becoming more of one. Offering AS as an explanation for something (an emotion, a behavior, a misunderstanding) is usually seen as making excuses or demanding special treatment, not as an explanation. In the last decade, it seems to have become a coin-toss as to whether you've going to encounter being treated as a complete invalid or an automatic psychopath the minute the word "Asperger" leaves your mouth.

Being in UK, diagnosis might present less of a hazard for you. Might be worth pursuing. Peace of mind is priceless-- in myexperience here in USA, diagnosis has cost me more peace of mind than it has brought. Might not be that way in UK-- it seems to be a bit closer to being a Scandinavian liberal paradise, and honestly "America the Land of the Free" is pretty damn barbaric in that respect.

The isolation issue I do not think anyone knows what to do other than try to make peace with it. I know people moving from one culture to another experience something similar. Only solution I know is seeking like minds-- but you are here so you are doing that. Diagnosis might or might not ease that.

What are the mood issues? There is potential help there. Depending on the issue.


where you live sounds quite unfair, I cant say for sure but i think here there is more acceptance, at least in my area. there is also a lot of legislation in place to protect people in the work place and make allowences for problems people may have.

well the mood problems are quite hard to explain, i find i become quite frustrated, and i get quite angry and feel violent, i dont hurt anyone but i have punched a wall before, the most obvious times is when i have to make a important choice, e.g. I felt ill and could not decide whether to go into school or not, for some reason that made me really out of control, that does not make any sense, it was a total over reaction but it keeps happening when im faced with difficult decisions, i was also the same when deciding what job i want to do. i know people find choices stressful but i think the amount of anger i felt was not normal.