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ceo145
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13 Jul 2017, 7:30 pm

Hey it is michael again i wondered if i really have aspergers because i have a good eye contact, i dont have problems being touched or hugged and i understand expressions such as " it is raining cats and dogs" i dont take it litterally.
However i always had problems socializing and was the "odd one out".
I also had i think hyperlexia because i was reading childrens encyclopedias by age 1 or 2 and i used to like solving rubbic's (that is what my mum told me so it must be true) and i prefered to isolate myself and read than being with peers.
Furthermore i was sorting out objects by shapes and colors and didn't want to have food mixed and had the habit of reading over a page and feeling it.
Does it sounds like i have the syndrome or more autism traits.
PS: I am American and also french and currently living in france and i obtained my diagnosis in what they call an autism resource center ( CRA in French) a highly specialized center reattached to a teaching hospital.



EzraS
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13 Jul 2017, 7:54 pm

You're autistic if you have a neurological disorder called autism. If you have that condition, whether or not you have A and B but not C and D trait, is irrelevant.

I understand things like metaphors and sarcasm just fine, but there's no doubt that I have significant autism.



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14 Jul 2017, 6:59 am

It's a different neurological order, rather than a disorder all the time.

And as for the OP, there is no one symptom or group of symptoms you need to get a diagnosis, any combo at a high enough intensity with a certain amount of symptoms in the combo will get you a diagnosis.



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19 Jul 2017, 5:58 pm

I know quite a few people on the spectrum in real life who make eye contact, like touch, and understand simple idioms. You could have learned to hide these traits, or never had them at all. I never really made eye contact when I was little; I always looked at the person's mouth. You don't have to have every single trait to have autism :D .


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19 Jul 2017, 6:28 pm

ceo145 wrote:
i wondered if i really have aspergers because i have a good eye contact, i dont have problems being touched or hugged and i understand expressions such as " it is raining cats and dogs" i dont take it litterally.


Not everyone with an ASD has ALL the traits listed in the DSM, and many who THINK they don't have certain symptoms actually DO, but don't recognize them because of acquired "coping mechanisms" learned over the years that mask them. What feels like decent eye contact to YOU may still look like poor eye contact to a normal observer. Problems being touched or hugged may seem non-existent because you haven't yet been touched or hugged in the right way or by the right people. Family is one thing, complete strangers another.

As for taking things literally - descriptions in the DSM are written to describe autistic symptoms in CHILDREN. If you are over the age of 9 years old, you should be expected to have figured that stuff out by now.

ceo145 wrote:
Does it sounds like i have the syndrome or more autism traits.l.


There is no longer any such designation as "Asperger Syndrome." It was removed from the most recent incarnation of The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Illnesses We are all now simply denizens of the "Autism Spectrum," though, no doubt, there are still professional methods of distinguishing at what point on the spectrum various individuals lie. So folks like myself, originally diagnosed with "Aspergers Disorder" are now just "Autistic," which we were all along, anyway.

Personally, I was not crazy about the change initially, but after much thought, I have decided it only makes sense. Autism is autism, the only difference is in how well you function in spite of it. "High Functioning" only means you can tie your own shoes and go potty by yourself, it doesn't mean you're a genius with a "mild" disorder. :?


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kraftiekortie
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19 Jul 2017, 9:28 pm

I didn't "figure all that stuff out," by and large, until I was an adult.

I still make mistakes sometimes. I still take things literally sometimes.



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19 Jul 2017, 9:38 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
I didn't "figure all that stuff out," by and large, until I was an adult.

I still make mistakes sometimes. I still take things literally sometimes.


Me too :D When I read online that people made eye contact with each other, I was very surprised (I thought it was only for business deals). Some figurative sayings that I have heard before I still don't get at first (it takes me a minute to figure them out) which can result in some pretty funny awkward moments :). I'm hoping I'll improve someday.


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28 Jul 2017, 12:57 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
I didn't "figure all that stuff out," by and large, until I was an adult.

I still make mistakes sometimes. I still take things literally sometimes.


:D Well, yes, my mind also still tends to run toward the literal interpretation of almost any statement - when something is first said, I frequently picture it in my mind as literal, then reject that interpretation as improbable and adjust accordingly. Frequently I will make a joke of the situation, by pretending to interpret the remark literally just as a goof, or turning it into a pun.

What I meant was, that by the time one reaches adolescence, if one is of average intelligence, one has generally realized that "raining cats and dogs" doesn't literally mean animals are falling from the sky. Although, to be honest, I still find that metaphor to be extremely odd and pointless. What on Earth have house pets got to do with heavy rain? :?


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ZombieBrideXD
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28 Jul 2017, 5:28 pm

EzraS wrote:
You're autistic if you have a neurological disorder called autism. If you have that condition, whether or not you have A and B but not C and D trait, is irrelevant.

I understand things like metaphors and sarcasm just fine, but there's no doubt that I have significant autism.


i agree with ezra, and it works both ways!

i never had a problem with tone of voice and medaphors however im still autistic.

just like there are people who can have almost every 'trait' of Autism and still not be autistic.

its delicate


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Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 170 of 200
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