Shaking table while writing or erasing

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whiterat
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13 Apr 2013, 3:45 am

(Not sure if this is an autism issue, moderators/admins please move this thread if you think it doesn't belong here. Thanks.)

I tend to shake my desk a lot when I write a lot or erase, but it's not an issue when I am ticking correct answers or crossing wrong answers in students' work. Sometimes when I am recording marks or making during home tutoring sessions my student will express her displeasure about this vocally. This was also an issue with a certain deskmate when I was in school too (we had separate desks joined together so she would move her desk a little bit further away). I try writing more lightly, but I still exert enough force to vibrate the desk. Anyone has this problem too, and is there any good solution to this? Thanks.



Jensen
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13 Apr 2013, 5:31 am

You are just being energetic, and you probably have forceful movements in other situations as well, when you get engaged.
Not Aspie-thing. Just a temperament/personality-thing.


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LabPet
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13 Apr 2013, 5:33 am

I might have an idea; when I little I hated cursive handwriting and although my handwriting is not good, it is now quite readable/legible.

- Choose a better writing implement. Pens with much thicker barrels help considerably with your grip. Flowing ink is best. I choose felt tip pens because they're much softer to write with. (There are orthotic grips available for pens, if that should help you - mostly these are designed for writers with arthritis or carpal tunnel syndrome, but it might help your grip).

- Use a blotter or a thick stack of paper rather than writing on a single page. This helps balance your writing so you're not moving so much.

- If block-style writing is better, using less pressure, then do that rather than cursive.

- If possible, choose a heavier desk that is on a carpet to absorb the shock.


*edit: I will add that dyspraxia (& difficulties with handwriting) is associated with ASD; I think your post is therefore appropriate.


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briankelley
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13 Apr 2013, 5:40 am

Sounds like Vonhuffinagle Syndrome. While not related to Aspergers Syndrome, Gustaf Vonhuffinagle and Hans Asperger were college roommates for one semester.

Suggested treatment: 5 to 10 milligrams of finesse.



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13 Apr 2013, 5:52 am

briankelley wrote:
Sounds like Vonhuffinagle Syndrome


Geez :roll:


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briankelley
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13 Apr 2013, 7:01 am

LabPet wrote:
briankelley wrote:
Sounds like Vonhuffinagle Syndrome


Geez :roll:


Sorry, I was in a weird mood. When I think about it, I was very awkward and clumsy as a child and made a lot of ruckus whether at a school desk or at a lunch bench or dining table. Lots of poorly coordinated exaggerated movements. They called it motor dysfunction. I outgrew it, for the most part.



LabPet
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13 Apr 2013, 8:00 am

Yeah, my handwriting is much better now (but not naturally) :)


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whiterat
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13 Apr 2013, 9:14 am

LabPet wrote:
I might have an idea; when I little I hated cursive handwriting and although my handwriting is not good, it is now quite readable/legible.

- Choose a better writing implement. Pens with much thicker barrels help considerably with your grip. Flowing ink is best. I choose felt tip pens because they're much softer to write with. (There are orthotic grips available for pens, if that should help you - mostly these are designed for writers with arthritis or carpal tunnel syndrome, but it might help your grip).

- Use a blotter or a thick stack of paper rather than writing on a single page. This helps balance your writing so you're not moving so much.

- If block-style writing is better, using less pressure, then do that rather than cursive.

- If possible, choose a heavier desk that is on a carpet to absorb the shock.


*edit: I will add that dyspraxia (& difficulties with handwriting) is associated with ASD; I think your post is therefore appropriate.


Thanks for your reply. Not sure if dyspraxia is in my diagnosis (made when I was a toddler and way before I had to do a lot of writing in school, so this issue only showed up when I was a little older).

I work in home environments (my own and my students') and due to the year-round hot and humid weather in Singapore, we don't usually have carpets at home. In an office with carpets this might be less of an issue.

Your suggestions didn't quite work for me, but when I tested them out just now, I find it helps if I slow down.



Callista
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13 Apr 2013, 9:38 am

If you use separate tables, then that helps. I've been on the other side of this, with a deskmate shaking the desk just enough to irritate me, and it really does cause problems. (Said deskmate was not, as far as I know, autistic.) Better work out a solution that'll work to mutual satisfaction.


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