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SteelMaiden
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12 Apr 2013, 2:58 pm

What exactly does "active but odd" mean as an Asperger's trait? Can you give me a list of examples?


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whirlingmind
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12 Apr 2013, 3:26 pm

If you click the link in my signature, you will see at the bottom (or near the bottom) of the thread, a description of all the 4 subtypes of AS, including the "Active but Odd" subtype.


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nessa238
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12 Apr 2013, 3:33 pm

I've always found that an insulting term. It implies you're managing to take part in society but don't ever forget you're still odd/weird and it will be picked up on immediately!

Being termed odd or weird etc makes me feel like doing something really f-king 'odd' to the people who use these terms!

like pulling an axe out and chopping their head off - is that 'odd' enough for them I wonder?

it's certainly active! :twisted:



Moondust
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12 Apr 2013, 4:04 pm

"Active but odd" is the way NLD often are socially. I fit that type to perfection. When you start relating to me, you can't believe anyone would find me weird or off in any way and you're convinced that I've just had bad luck with people all my life. I'm vibrant, fascinating, intelligent, wise, funny, attractive, well-mannered, pleasant. I pass interviews with flying colors. I charm people wherever I go. I make an excellent hostess. Then as we continue talking, you start realizing that something about me is "odd". At some point, and this can take minutes or years, the person runs from me for the woods.


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nessa238
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12 Apr 2013, 4:08 pm

I see myself as normal and the people who find me 'odd' as intolerant idiots - this is generally how I see the world



AgentPalpatine
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12 Apr 2013, 4:09 pm

I also find the term disagreable, and for that matter, I find the "types" of AS theory to be out of date.


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nightflight575
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12 Apr 2013, 4:21 pm

nessa238 wrote:
I see myself as normal and the people who find me 'odd' as intolerant idiots - this is generally how I see the world

Same here, actually.



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12 Apr 2013, 4:26 pm

I dunno, I'm personally not bothered by it much. Odd, unusual, atypical. Maybe "atypical" sounds better? But I don't blame others for picking up on me being odd and being leery of odd behavior. I think it's how people are hardwired. Maybe one of those primal instinct things. I don't think they can help it. And I'm leery myself of certain people based on their odd/unusual/atypical behavior.



CaptainTrips222
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12 Apr 2013, 4:41 pm

I think most aspies would fall into an active but odd classification. Most are functional in society, but people still pick up on their mannerisms, or just something.



nessa238
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12 Apr 2013, 4:45 pm

briankelley wrote:
I dunno, I'm personally not bothered by it much. Odd, unusual, atypical. Maybe "atypical" sounds better? But I don't blame others for picking up on me being odd and being leery of odd behavior. I think it's how people are hardwired. Maybe one of those primal instinct things. I don't think they can help it. And I'm leery myself of certain people based on their odd/unusual/atypical behavior.


Can you give examples of this 'odd/unusual/atypical' behaviour?



Moondust
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12 Apr 2013, 5:00 pm

CaptainTrips, "active but odd" is meant to differentiate with the introverted, aloof type. We're highly sociable and keep approaching people, feeling totally at ease with people, but we come across as odd.


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nessa238
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12 Apr 2013, 5:05 pm

Moondust wrote:
CaptainTrips, "active but odd" is meant to differentiate with the introverted, aloof type. We're highly sociable and keep approaching people, feeling totally at ease with people, but we come across as odd.


I never saw the 'active' as meaning extrovert or at ease with people; I saw it as meaning more independent

I'm never at ease with people but I can be assertive in more formal situations

I feel the judgement of most people seeing me as 'odd' very heavily and I hate it!

It's like a denial of my right to equal treatment; a denial of me being just as valid and relevant as anyone else

it brings out the competitive spirit in me and I will actively seek ways in which they're wrong so I can be 'better' than them in that respect

I've noticed a definite correlation between the extent that a person finds me odd and a) the extent of their stupidity and b) the extent to which they'll be no good at their job

This gives me a sense of victory over these judgers of oddness!



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12 Apr 2013, 5:11 pm

In essence, if you're "active but odd",

A) you actively approach other people ("most of the time" you initiate social interaction and do not withdraw from other people's approaches, you do not ignore it if others attempt to engage you socially and you do not simply stay passive, meaning you do allow it if others attempt to engage you in social interaction and but you do not reciprocate)

B) but you do so in an odd manner (as described in thr criteria, in some way your social interaction differs from that of "the average person" who doesn't have autism -

Examples, uhm... trying to share an interest with someone who isn't interested to hear about it or continuing to talk about an interest to someone who has lost interest and wants to change the topic.

Greeting/talking to someone who non-verbally signals that he doesn't want to be talked to. Ignoring how someone feels or trying to pay attention to how someone feels but failing to intuitively identify their state of mind and failing to intuitively adjust your behaviour to the person/the situation.

Then there's participating in class or during a meeting at work or in whatever kind of group of people and not being tuned into how the group operates socially. Talking, excessive talking, asking questions when with their behaviour others in the group have expressed that talking or asking questions is not currently socially accepted. Participating in group work either by being okay with it or not wanting to do it and trying to avoid it but dominating or withdrawing from the group or just being really out of sync with your thought process and the ideas you present or with your opinion on when to meet up or when to take a break.

Interrupting others a lot or getting interrupted a lot not simply because someone else is really rude and doesn't pay attention to your non-verbal signals but because you don't send out a sort of huge and clear "I have something to say, pay attention to me now"-vibe when you're about to start to talk.


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Moondust
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12 Apr 2013, 5:12 pm

The "active" is meant as "socially active".


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AgentPalpatine
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12 Apr 2013, 5:13 pm

We would be better off if the term was retired as a misunderstanding at a time when neurodiversity was poorly understood.

See the above....the term leads to confusion, and allows negative sterotypes when they really wern't meant to be established.


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12 Apr 2013, 5:14 pm

What Sora said. That's me exactly.


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