Page 1 of 5 [ 63 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next

bl44d3lf
Pileated woodpecker
Pileated woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 24 Mar 2013
Gender: Male
Posts: 187

29 Sep 2014, 8:44 am

how do they see reality vs how we see reality ? how does a asperger view reality ? and how does a normal person view reality ? is it a like a tv screen first person vs third person i am right ?

do go into detail please :)



Charloz
Sea Gull
Sea Gull

User avatar

Joined: 1 Feb 2014
Age: 28
Gender: Male
Posts: 234

29 Sep 2014, 8:48 am

I hate the term "normal person". Someone with AS can be just as 'normal' as any NT and someone NT can be just as eccentric as anyone on the spectrum.

My objection to that term aside, I do believe some of us view the world around us in a different and often more original way. I have seen people here who look at the world in a very technical, logical and matter-of-fact way whereas others are more imaginative, creative and playful in their view of their surroundings. There is no such thing as "the autistic", but in general there's a fair amount of us who have interesting, out-of-the-box viewpoints on various things. This, I believe, is a testament to our creativity and our value in the world.


_________________
Often misunderstood, and at the same time forever trying to understand others


Kiriae
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 30 Mar 2014
Age: 31
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,349
Location: Kraków, Poland

29 Sep 2014, 9:24 am

I recently acknowledged there is difference about how people see gift giving. I'm not sure if it is true of all AS or NTs but that's what we think:

I (AS) give a gift to someone when I like him/her and want to make him/her happy. Eventually to show I like him/her.

My (NT) friend gives a gift to someone to see his/her reaction. He can guess whatever the person reciving the gift likes him, is just being friendly or is indifferent by looking at the person face when he/she receives the gift. It's a kind of test.



bl44d3lf
Pileated woodpecker
Pileated woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 24 Mar 2013
Gender: Male
Posts: 187

29 Sep 2014, 9:26 am

Charloz wrote:
I hate the term "normal person". Someone with AS can be just as 'normal' as any NT and someone NT can be just as eccentric as anyone on the spectrum.

My objection to that term aside, I do believe some of us view the world around us in a different and often more original way. I have seen people here who look at the world in a very technical, logical and matter-of-fact way whereas others are more imaginative, creative and playful in their view of their surroundings. There is no such thing as "the autistic", but in general there's a fair amount of us who have interesting, out-of-the-box viewpoints on various things. This, I believe, is a testament to our creativity and our value in the world.


so we can be the same .... is it common sense ?=?



kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 67,309
Location: Queens, NYC

29 Sep 2014, 9:30 am

I believe NT's also give gifts for the same reason Kiriae stated (to express a "like" for someone), as well the "test" which she mentioned.

Perhaps, NT's employ gifts as a "test" more often than people with ASD's.



bl44d3lf
Pileated woodpecker
Pileated woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 24 Mar 2013
Gender: Male
Posts: 187

29 Sep 2014, 10:01 am

but in general could you describe the asperger person diffrent then the normal one .... like values and such ... )



Charloz
Sea Gull
Sea Gull

User avatar

Joined: 1 Feb 2014
Age: 28
Gender: Male
Posts: 234

29 Sep 2014, 10:12 am

bl44d3lf wrote:
so we can be the same .... is it common sense ?=?


Sometimes we are and sometimes we are not. But two autistic people are never 100% the same and will always see the world around them in different lights depending on their personality and their mood at the time.


_________________
Often misunderstood, and at the same time forever trying to understand others


bl44d3lf
Pileated woodpecker
Pileated woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 24 Mar 2013
Gender: Male
Posts: 187

29 Sep 2014, 10:35 am

Charloz wrote:
bl44d3lf wrote:
so we can be the same .... is it common sense ?=?


Sometimes we are and sometimes we are not. But two autistic people are never 100% the same and will always see the world around them in different lights depending on their personality and their mood at the time.



could define some traits of autistic people then ? ( a high definition )



Charloz
Sea Gull
Sea Gull

User avatar

Joined: 1 Feb 2014
Age: 28
Gender: Male
Posts: 234

29 Sep 2014, 10:49 am

bl44d3lf wrote:
Charloz wrote:
bl44d3lf wrote:
so we can be the same .... is it common sense ?=?


Sometimes we are and sometimes we are not. But two autistic people are never 100% the same and will always see the world around them in different lights depending on their personality and their mood at the time.



could define some traits of autistic people then ? ( a high definition )


I cannot as no two autistics are the same. Some think and act just like NT's whereas some NT's think and act just like autistics. There's considerable overlap.


_________________
Often misunderstood, and at the same time forever trying to understand others


Sweetleaf
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 Jan 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 30,932
Location: Somewhere in Colorado

29 Sep 2014, 12:16 pm

bl44d3lf wrote:
Charloz wrote:
I hate the term "normal person". Someone with AS can be just as 'normal' as any NT and someone NT can be just as eccentric as anyone on the spectrum.

My objection to that term aside, I do believe some of us view the world around us in a different and often more original way. I have seen people here who look at the world in a very technical, logical and matter-of-fact way whereas others are more imaginative, creative and playful in their view of their surroundings. There is no such thing as "the autistic", but in general there's a fair amount of us who have interesting, out-of-the-box viewpoints on various things. This, I believe, is a testament to our creativity and our value in the world.


so we can be the same .... is it common sense ?=?


I don't really get how someone with autism could be just as normal as an NT or how an NT could be just as eccentric as anyone on the spectrum....maybe it can look like that on the outside but I guarantee there'd still be underlying differences in neurology....having abnormal or atypical neurology sort of cancels out one being 'normal' in my opinion or at least having normal neurology. In general the term normal is rather subjective though, I mean yeah some people with aspergers can hold jobs, live what is a pretty typical life with minor struggles in functioning compared to others who might be unable to hold a job or start a family or what not....and people with typical neurology can live intresting lifestyles and under too much stress it would probably effect their functioning and cognitive abilities and what not.

But there isn't like a single way autistic people see the world vs. everyone else, it can vary quite a lot....In my perspective I think things are probably more intense for me than normal people like sensory stuff like light, sound, crowded areas, vibes and all that all the time get overwhelming....but not really sure how else to explain it I mean a lot of other thing contribute to how I see things to.


_________________
Welcome to hell, this is the end.


Joe90
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Gender: Female
Posts: 17,612
Location: Maidstone, UK

29 Sep 2014, 12:44 pm

I usually base my thinking on opinions, emotions and common sense, like apparently most NTs do.

I do believe an NT can be eccentric, without being drug-related or alcohol-related. There are other conditions besides Autism which can make a person seem ''abnormal'' or different to others.

I do hate it when people try to split the whole population into 2 groups; 1% Autistic and 99% completely normal. That'd be like saying something like ''X% of the world speak English and Y% of the world speak French'' (X and Y adding up to 100, by the way). It's not accurate to just say that. But I suppose it is common for Aspies/Autistics to have black and white thinking, although I don't think in black and white. I always believe there are shades of grey in almost everything.


_________________
Female
Aged 29
On antidepressants
Diagnosed with AS, ADHD and anxiety disorder


olympiadis
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 20 Jun 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,849
Location: Fairview Heights Illinois

29 Sep 2014, 12:59 pm

Generally, autistics perceive the real world as it is.
Generally, NTs perceive the world as filtered through their identities, which are imagined.

Generally, autistics have intuitions about the real world, and reason their way through the imagined world.
Generally, NTs have intuitions about the imagined world, and use their reasoning ability relatively rarely.



Sweetleaf
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 Jan 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 30,932
Location: Somewhere in Colorado

29 Sep 2014, 1:10 pm

olympiadis wrote:
Generally, autistics perceive the real world as it is.
Generally, NTs perceive the world as filtered through their identities, which are imagined.

Generally, autistics have intuitions about the real world, and reason their way through the imagined world.
Generally, NTs have intuitions about the imagined world, and use their reasoning ability relatively rarely.


What do you mean their identities are imagined, neurotypical people cannot have real identities?


_________________
Welcome to hell, this is the end.


bl44d3lf
Pileated woodpecker
Pileated woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 24 Mar 2013
Gender: Male
Posts: 187

29 Sep 2014, 2:06 pm

to be honest i get the sense that most people are fake "........



Eloa
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 9 Jun 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,239

29 Sep 2014, 2:39 pm

Temple Grandin writes in "Thinking in Pictures":

Quote:
In my high school diary I wrote: "One should not always be a watcher - the cold impersonal observer - but instead should participate." Even today ,my thinking is from the vantage point of an observer, I did not realize that this was different until two years ago, when I took a test in which a piece of classical music evoked vivid images in my imagination. My images were similar to other people's, but I always imagined them as an observer. Most people see themselves participating in their images."


I relate to this.
Last week I joined a week of group therapy were guided imagery was used.
There were people who do not see images, but feel instead.
There are people who see images and feel.
I did see images as I am visually thinking, I see them into tiniest detail, but when asked "what did you feel" I communicated that I simply observed.
In communication people just can tell about themselves in relation to other people and tell a lot of the intentions other people were having.
I cannot tell about other people's intentions as I don't know their intentions.
To communicate I must be able to evoke images in my head, otherwise I cannot communicate.
I also seem to focus on other things than people usually do.
The therapist told to the group: "When I picked up Eloa 4 weeks ago by car at the airport first thing she said was: "Last year your car was parked 5 parking lots more to the right." (which is a fact).
Everyone was wondering how I could remember this.
My guess is that people usually do not make a visual map from the place they are, maybe they are more focussed at how to socialize with the person who picks them up.
In the therapy room was a shelf with little bottles all filled with liquid in different colours, more than a hunderd (113+20 extras).
I said: "There are two the same."
Everyone was again wondering that I noticed it.
I just do notice these things as the visual pattern was interrupted.


_________________
English is not my native language, so I will very likely do mistakes in writing or understanding. My edits are due to corrections of mistakes, which I sometimes recognize just after submitting a text.