Page 1 of 3 [ 38 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next


Do you think in pictures?
Yes. 55%  55%  [ 30 ]
No. 24%  24%  [ 13 ]
Not sure. 22%  22%  [ 12 ]
Total votes : 55

L_Holmes
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 18 Jul 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,468
Location: Twin Falls, ID

19 Oct 2014, 6:43 pm

I was curious to see how many people here would say that they definitely think in pictures like Temple Grandin describes. I am pretty sure that I don't, which was confusing to me for a while, because I don't think I'm a verbal thinker either.

I was reading "The Autistic Brain" by Temple Grandin, and I came across a chapter about this subject. In it she was talking about how she originally assumed that all autistic individuals had a very similar if not identical way of thinking to hers, but had come to realize that wasn't really the case. I was intrigued when I saw this (that's why I ended up purchasing the book), because when I first read about "thinking in pictures" I didn't feel like I related to that way of thinking. Like, if I was asked to picture a rainbow, I literally just see the colors of a rainbow, I don't get any kind of vivid imagery or associated memories. But Temple Grandin said she pictured a specific rainbow that she saw from her hotel window and that she went out to get a better look at it.

But what I'm really wondering about is that she explains that there are likely two types of visual thinkers: object and spatial. Object thinkers are like her, they see vivid imagery and picture things easily, and spatial thinkers see patterns in things, but do not visualize pictures in the same way, they see things in a more mathematical and literal way. I am definitely a more mathematical thinker, and I am much better at seeing patterns than I am at seeing imagery.

Spatial thinkers are also supposedly much better at mentally manipulating objects, like seeing what a paper looks like after folding it a certain way, or rotating and moving 3D objects in space etc. But I am not good at that, at all. It's like I forget what the original object looks like as soon as I try to move it in my mind, even if I'm staring right at it. I have to concentrate VERY hard to do it, and I still only get some of those questions right. One online IQ test I took told me that my spatial reasoning was much lower than average (it was called the Rutherford IQ test). But maybe that's just because I have poor working memory, I can't remember the image long enough to be able to rotate or move it from it's original position.


_________________
"It has long been an axiom of mine that the little things are infinitely the most important."

- Sherlock Holmes


Last edited by L_Holmes on 19 Oct 2014, 8:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.

NiceCupOfTea
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 15 Aug 2014
Age: 46
Gender: Female
Posts: 644

19 Oct 2014, 6:50 pm

I think I must be more of a spatial thinker, because I don't get vivid imagery for most things that I think about. Can't comment on Temple Grandin's experiences; I've not read her. (Haven't even got around to reading Tony Atwood yet, let alone anybody else.... :-/) Also in IQ tests, I tend to do well on the spatial questions. Better than at the number ones at any rate.



Kurgan
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 Apr 2012
Age: 32
Gender: Male
Posts: 4,130
Location: Scandinavia

19 Oct 2014, 7:10 pm

I think in pictures the way Temple Grandin describes. It's more common in non-NLD aspies than in NLD aspies (80% of people with AS also have NLD).


_________________
“He who controls the spice controls the universe.”


Lumi
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 7 Sep 2012
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,513
Location: Positive-minded

19 Oct 2014, 7:14 pm

My memories are in pictures.


_________________
God-dependent, curious and self-studying Japanese


Swiper
Pileated woodpecker
Pileated woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 8 Sep 2014
Age: 48
Gender: Male
Posts: 192

19 Oct 2014, 7:30 pm

I have never really understood this. I would like to learn and figure this out, but so far it have gone over my head.

If I need to go to the store, I see an image of a particular store stored in memory.
If I am told to picture a rainbow, I will see a rainbow in a scenery from some stored memory.
My memories is in pictures or films. (doesn't that applies for everyone? how else do you remember?)
I'm not good at manipulating an image in my mind.


_________________
Autism Spectrum Disorder, Level 1 (with language impairment) and Other Specified Anxiety Disorder
Aspie Score: 140 of 200, NT Score: 63 of 200
You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)


blueblahbleh
Raven
Raven

User avatar

Joined: 17 Nov 2013
Gender: Male
Posts: 116
Location: Wrong Planet

19 Oct 2014, 7:41 pm

I am very much a visual spatial thinker, as opposed to thinking in 2D visual "pictures." My thoughts and mental experiences also tend to have textile feelings associated with them.



calstar2
Deinonychus
Deinonychus

User avatar

Joined: 24 Jul 2014
Age: 27
Gender: Female
Posts: 332

19 Oct 2014, 7:42 pm

Swiper wrote:
I have never really understood this. I would like to learn and figure this out, but so far it have gone over my head.

If I need to go to the store, I see an image of a particular store stored in memory.
If I am told to picture a rainbow, I will see a rainbow in a scenery from some stored memory.
My memories is in pictures or films. (doesn't that applies for everyone? how else do you remember?)
I'm not good at manipulating an image in my mind.


Same.

The only visuals in my thoughts are snapshots and I am entirely unable to manipulate any of it.



kamiyu910
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Dec 2012
Age: 36
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,036
Location: California

19 Oct 2014, 7:43 pm

I think in a mixture of emotions, auditory, and visual, and depending on the subject, smell... My senses are really sensitive and I love remembering everything about something, even the negatives. Like if you ask me to think of a mulberry tree, I'll think of a specific tree and picture it in my head, hear how it sounds in the wind and how it smells.
I don't know what it's called to think in feelings though.


_________________
Your Aspie score: 171 of 200
Your Neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 40 of 200


LocksAndLiqueur
Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl

User avatar

Joined: 29 May 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 160
Location: Yam hill County, Oregon

19 Oct 2014, 7:54 pm

I always just assumed this was normal, but I basically think in short video clips. They might be of something that has happened or something that I think may happen or am considering doing. For example: I'm trying to get permission to build a forge for the purpose of blacksmithing. Simply bringing this up conjures images from manuals on the subject I've found online, "vines" of discussions I've had with a relative of mine who makes his own knives, bows and arrows, discussions I've had about it with relatives that have no experience with blacksmithing as well as of things that haven't happened yet, but that I plan to make happen. I imagine myself working on building some of the many types of forges I have seen other suburban blacksmiths make. I imagine myself heating up an old bandsaw blade from the lumber mill, folding it over on it's self & transforming it into a kukri (curved, machete-like tool originally from Nepal). It's a more traditional one. I never did like the so called "tactical" kukris that are marketed to people who've seen too many zombie movies. It's fairly plain with a full tang attached to a lacquered wooden handle by three metal pins hammered in in such a way that they act like rivets.

That's just me though. Here is a picture of a kukri for those of you who may not be familiar with the tool. [img][800:725]http://www.nepalesekhukuri.com/products/KH0142_b.jpg[/img]



ASPartOfMe
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 25 Aug 2013
Age: 63
Gender: Male
Posts: 25,505
Location: Long Island, New York

19 Oct 2014, 7:54 pm

Not sure. it's just me and that is all I know.


_________________
Professionally Identified and joined WP August 26, 2013
DSM 5: Autism Spectrum Disorder, DSM IV: Aspergers Moderate Severity.

“My autism is not a superpower. It also isn’t some kind of god-forsaken, endless fountain of suffering inflicted on my family. It’s just part of who I am as a person”. - Sara Luterman


Campin_Cat
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 May 2014
Age: 59
Gender: Female
Posts: 25,953
Location: Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A.

19 Oct 2014, 8:17 pm

I'm just like Temple Grandin, by her definition of "object thinker". I can think in moving pictures, as well. Also, L_Holmes mentioned being able to see what a piece of paper would like if folded a certain way----I can totally do that. I do that often with crocheted pieces that I want to create.



kamiyu910
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Dec 2012
Age: 36
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,036
Location: California

19 Oct 2014, 8:18 pm

LocksAndLiqueur wrote:
I always just assumed this was normal, but I basically think in short video clips.


Actually, that would be a much better explanation for how I think. Movie format!


_________________
Your Aspie score: 171 of 200
Your Neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 40 of 200


JoelFan
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 May 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 599
Location: In a nerotypical world.

19 Oct 2014, 8:18 pm

L_Holmes wrote:
I was curious to see how many people here would say that they definitely think in pictures like Temple Grandin describes.
....she explains that there are likely two types of visual thinkers: object and spatial. Object thinkers are like her, they see vivid imagery and picture things easily,


Add me to that list,

As I stated before one of my writing assignments were (yes I got it right this time) describing a favorite room which I did flawless however last week's assignment was describe something beautiful you've seen. Which kinda stumped me because I don't know/understand the concept of beautiful I can't picture it if that makes sense.


_________________
"I really wish I was less of a thinking man and more of a fool not afraid of rejection." ~ Billy Joel


nerdygirl
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 16 Jun 2014
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,645
Location: In the land of abstractions and ideas.

19 Oct 2014, 8:31 pm

I imagine memories in pictures and "videos". I do remember some conversations, but I will remember those in context.

However, I am also good at spatial manipulation.

When I am trying to understand something, it is easiest when I can get a picture in my head, or if I can see a chart or formula (like in math or chemistry.) When I read, I often "type" the words on a keyboard in my head. It is rather annoying, actually.

I get stuck when talking sometimes because I see the picture of what I want to say in my head, but it takes too long for the picture to "download" into words that I can then get out of my mouth. I either look like an absent-minded fool not able to think of a word, or it takes too long someone loses interest, or someone interrupts my train of thought and it is lost. The more frazzled I am, the worse this is.



DevilKisses
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 3 Jul 2010
Age: 25
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,067
Location: Canada

19 Oct 2014, 9:00 pm

Ugh, it's hard to describe the way I think. I think I used to think more in pictures than I do now. I think I've suffered from some brain damage or brain fog. I used to be way better at math as well. I just have this endless chatter in my head. That probably interferes with my visual thinking. I used to do good in visual spatial tests, but now I'm horrible at them.


_________________
Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 82 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 124 of 200
You are very likely neurotypical


L_Holmes
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 18 Jul 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,468
Location: Twin Falls, ID

19 Oct 2014, 10:25 pm

DevilKisses wrote:
Ugh, it's hard to describe the way I think. I think I used to think more in pictures than I do now. I think I've suffered from some brain damage or brain fog. I used to be way better at math as well. I just have this endless chatter in my head. That probably interferes with my visual thinking. I used to do good in visual spatial tests, but now I'm horrible at them.


Me too. I feel like my cognitive abilities are slowly getting worse. My short term memory has gotten much worse, and so has my spelling, among other things. I used to never spell anything wrong, now I find myself spelling the same words wrong over and over. I also have been finding it much harder to read, and listen to verbal instructions.

It almost feels like I don't have a way of thinking. I wouldn't describe it as pictures. It would be more accurate to say it is constant talking like you said, and a lot of times it is almost nonsensical, which becomes especially apparent when I say my thoughts out loud to myself (which has also been happening more often). But I don't learn verbally, so I really doubt I am a verbal thinker. The way Temple Grandin describes spatial thinking is also "thinking in patterns", which I would have to say is the most accurate to my way of thinking, but it still doesn't feel like it quite fits.

I don't know, lately I just feel extremely confused half the time, so I don't even know what to think of myself anymore.


_________________
"It has long been an axiom of mine that the little things are infinitely the most important."

- Sherlock Holmes